Zack Breault retires from professional ranks

 

By Joel Charron

After two seasons with the Toronto Blue Jays Class A affiliate Vancouver Canadians, Zack Breault has retired from baseball.

The 24-year-old pitcher sent notification of this retirement late last week.

“This is something that was pre-determined,” said Breault. “I kind of knew that last season was going to be my last season.”

Breault signed a minor league contract with the Toronto Blue Jays in August 2010 and played two seasons with their Class A affiliate Vancouver Canadians.

In his first season with the Canadians, Breault was a starter and eventually was moved to the bullpen in his second season where he assumed the role of spot starter and relief.

Breault appeared in 33 games and compiled a record of 4-4 with a 5.52 career ERA, 102.2 innings pitched 63 strikeouts, 51 walks.

Although the former Villanova Wildcat is leaving the professional ranks he’ll have a few mementoes to remind him about his time in pro ball.

Breault is walking away with two Northwest League championship rings around his fingers, as the Canadians captured back-to-back championships in 2011 and 2012.

“Winning those championships was really cool. It’s something I will always remember,” he said. “Both were unique in their own way.”

After two season and two Northwest League championships wil the Toronto Blue Jays Class A affiliate Vancouver Canadians, Zack Breault is retiring from professional baseball.

After two season and two Northwest League championships wil the Toronto Blue Jays Class A affiliate Vancouver Canadians, Zack Breault is retiring from professional baseball.

Breault also won a national championship in 2005 with Team Ontario. He was also named in the 13th annual Canadian Baseball Network All-Canadian College team this year. Some notable names on that list include Jason Bay, Russell Martin and John Axford.

The 24-year-old said he is at peace with his decision, stating that the only thing that would have delayed his retirement was a promotion within the organization.

Breault knew trying to move up in the Blue Jays system was going to be hard but he admits it was more difficult than he originally thought.

“I always worked hard,” said Breault. “But it’s a lot harder than people think. I mean I knew it was going to very tough but it was definitely a little tougher than I thought.”

Breault noted that there are aspects of the game he will dearly miss, such as being around the players in the locker room.

“There are certain people and teammates I will always remember. It makes for good stories,” he joked.

During his time in Vancouver, Breault said his host family; Bill and Jana Maclagan and their children Konner and Keegan did everything they could to make him feel at home.

“They were great people,” said Breault. “They did everything in their power to make me feel as comfortable as possible. They were a pretty big part of my pro career.”

Breault also credits his former Villanova teammates like Josh Federico and Brian Simone for pushing him to be better.

Currently Breault is attending the University of Windsor for Sociology. He plans to follow a career in law enforcement.

Although Breault is leaving the professional game, he plans to still be involved with baseball in the local level.

“On Saturdays I’m coaching teams out of LaSalle and Windsor,” he said. “I love being around the game, I can never completely walk away from it.”

Breault is even contemplating playing for the Amherstburg Senior Cardinals.

“I’ve already been approached about playing for them, but I’m going to have to see how things fall into place,” he said.

Although Breault won’t be throwing at the professional level again he does have some advice for the kids hoping to throw in the Major Leagues one day.

“No dream is too big but you have to stay grounded,” he said, “You can’t put yourself in a situation where the water is going to be over your head. “

 

 

 

Comments are closed.