Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association

Farm Credit Canada assists WETRA in acquiring new tractor

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) now has the funding for the acquisition of a new tractor.

WETRA was approved for one of 78 grants from Farm Credit Canada’s (FCC) AgriSpirit Fund and received $25,000 to help fund the purchase of a new tractor for the McGregor facility. An official presentation was made last week.

Becky Mills, executive director at WETRA, thanked the two FCC officials that attended the announcement for the contribution to the tractor fund.

Sina Naebkhil from WETRA, Debra Wadia and Anne Baldo from Farm Credit Canada, and WETRA executive director conduct a cheque presentation in front of the old tractor WETRA is replacing. Farm Credit Canada’s AgriSpirit grant program is funding a new tractor to the tune of $25,000.

“As you know, no farm is complete without a tractor, the workhorse of the agricultural and maintenance aspects of running a rural operation,” said Mills. “Here at WETRA, horses are the modality for which our therapy services take place and it brings a whole other aspect of running our programs when caring for the therapy horses. Maintaining pastures, stalls, manure piles and riding areas as well as fertilizing, cutting and harvesting our 22 acres of hay is essential to sustaining optimal health within our herd and it becomes a full-time job in and of itself.”

Mills added that the tractor “will not side idle for more than a few hours a week” and noted that it is absolutely necessary for WETRA’s operation.

“We simply cannot survive without a fully functional, updated tractor,” said Mills.

Mills added that WETRA has been providing services to people with disabilities since 1963 and thanks to the support of funders like FCC, “we are able to continue with our mission and ensure that those in need will have the opportunity to experience life on a horse farm and feel good about the environment in which they are warmly received by such gentle animals.”

FCC was represented by senior district manager Debra Wadia and relationship manager Anne Baldo. Wadia said the AgriSpirit fund has been around since 2004. In 2016, a total of $1 million was distributed through grants across Canada with that number upped to $1.5 million in 2017 in recognition of Canada’s 150th birthday.

Wadia said FCC has a rating system of how to look at grant applications and WETRA “hit all of them.”

Awarding grants to organizations such as WETRA “is the best part of my job,” Baldo added.

The FCC AgriSpirit Fund awards between $5,000 and $25,000 for community improvement projects. There were 1,214 applications received this year with proceeds going to rural, small town Canadian projects. Over the past 14 years, the FCC AgriSpirit Fund has supported almost 1,100 projects, an investment of more than $12 million.

WETRA throws 12th annual Spooktacular on the Farm

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

Not a single person or horse was left without a costume during the Windsor Essex Therapeutic Riding Association’s 12th annual Spooktacular event.

From an assortment of treats when walking through the doors in the Witch’s Brew Café, to face painting, pony rides, and even a magic show, hundreds of attendees were able to get into the Halloween spirit.

The Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) held its 12th annual “Spooktacular on the Farm” recently. A wide assortmentof activities were held as part of the weekend event.

“In 2005 we were brainstorming different fundraising ideas to generate funds to sustain our Therapeutic Equine assisted therapies, and our team came up with this idea and over the years it has grown to become a tradition for families and the community to attend,” explained Sina Naebkhil, fund-development officer for WETRA. “At first the headless horseman was just a costume and now it’s a full on show becoming a attraction that brings the community to the farm. Really this idea came from a group of dedicated volunteers who wanted WETRA to grow and recognized that the work we were doing changes lives.”

Naebkhil explained the Spooktacular event has become their biggest fundraiser, with all the proceeds raised going right back into their programs, allowing them to provide equine related therapies to more than 200 clients each week.

The Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) held its 12th annual “Spooktacular on the Farm” recently. A wide assortmentof activities were held as part of the weekend event.

The goal is to continue to grow the event, because Naebkhil said, the more the event grows, the more WETRA grows, and the more they are able to help those within the community.

“I love getting ready for Spooktacular, we have so much support from different groups who show up the week before and help to set-up,” said Naebkhil. “It truly is magical to see the farm transform from the everyday to this spectacular Halloween paradise. It truly is one of my favorite events at WETRA.”

 

WETRA hosts third annual “Strides for Stability” horse show

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Billed as “equestrians making a difference,” the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association held a horse show over Labour Day weekend with a fun and fundraising twist to it.

WETRA presented the third annual “Strides for Stability” horse show Sept. 2-3 with executive director Becky Mills stating “local equestrians thought it would be nice to host a fun horse show” with friends helping to sponsor the divisions the riders participated in.

Jacob O’Neill and his horse Peak My Curiosity jump over an obstacle during the “Strides for Stability” horse show at the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) over the Labour Day weekend.

Jacob O’Neill and his horse Peak My Curiosity jump over an obstacle during the “Strides for Stability” horse show at the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) over the Labour Day weekend.

The event was held as a fundraiser for WETRA, which helps offer therapeutic riding lessons for those with disabilities. The weekend show allowed riders of all ages and abilities a chance to have fun and showcase their skills.

“They raise over $12,000 every year and they hope to do it again this year,” said Mills.

Jacqueline Chevalier, co-ordinator of the “Strides for Stability” horse show, believed the event actually surpassed the $12,000 mark this year. Noting she grew up around WETRA since she was younger as her mother was a board member, Chevalier said the idea was created a few years ago to have local barns from around Windsor-Essex County come together for a fun event.

Those who are part of WETRA’s program get to participate, Chevalier added, as it can be difficult for them to travel to other barns to compete. At “Strides for Stability,” the WETRA riders are on their own ring and familiar with the surroundings.

Tamara Kryway and her horse R. Kallisto compete at the third annual Strides for Stability horse show at WETRA last Saturday.

Tamara Kryway and her horse R. Kallisto compete at the third annual Strides for Stability horse show at WETRA last Saturday.

Horse barns from around the area are great in supporting WETRA, Chevalier said, as “WETRA is a huge part of the community.”

“We’re happy to have people support it,” she added. “It’s competitive but we want people to come out and have fun.”

The Border City Barkers were also on hand with the agility dog team competing with and against jumper horses in competitions. There were also awards, raffles and a chance to visit the therapy horses offered as part of the weekend.

WETRA is located at 3323 North Malden Road, just south of McGregor, and more information can be found at www.wetra.ca.

WETRA receives Ontario150 Community Capital Program Funding to pave accessible parking spaces

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

A grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation has allowed a local therapeutic riding association to pave accessible parking spaces for their clients.

Since the new facility was built in 2011, the gravel parking lot has posed many restrictions and hardships on the number of people the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association services each week. When the facility was built, they ensured a portico was build so their clients families could pull up underneath it and drop off their client, however if there happen to be several families coming through at once, the portico got very congested, and staff noted the harsh winter conditions often made the gravel parking lot incredibly treacherous.

“The Ontario 150 Community Capital Program’s contribution to the project will allow over 200 people served here each week to safely park and exit their vehicles without the barrier of stones underneath walkers and wheelchairs as well as provide stability under foot for all who enjoy our equine therapy services,” explained Becky Mills, managing director, CTR11 and Path Intl., and certified instructor. “Our facility brings together volunteers, riders, caregivers and community members every day, and the new parking spaces will add a more inviting element to our center.”

Essex MPP Taras Natyshak (far left) was on hand to celebrate WETRA's recent Ontario Trillium Foundation grant that was used for parking lot upgrades.

Essex MPP Taras Natyshak (far left) was on hand to celebrate WETRA’s recent Ontario Trillium Foundation grant that was used for parking lot upgrades.

WETRA was founded in 1963 by Dr. Elmer Butt in Windsor. Mills explained he was a local radiologist and operated out of a small facility on five acres in Windsor, which is where WETRA remained until 2011. Once they had the opportunity to move into a new building and create a facility of 72 acres of land in the county, it was a no brainer. Since their build, they have been focusing on one project at a time.

“It’s amazing how accessibility can be granted by just a little bit of cement and lift the barrier the gravel driveway presented,” said Essex MPP Taras Natyshak. “For you to recognize that and to put together a plan with the Ontario Trillium Foundation, and your donors and volunteers, that goes a long way to ensure that this facility is accessible and puts your at the top as being champions in accessibility.”

Just 14,000 square feet of space was paved, and considering the overall size of their parking lot, Mills said it might not look like much but it came with a total price tag of $36,000. Of that, $26,000 was grant money and the additional $10,000 was raised through WETRA’s numerous initiatives such as selling t-shirts out of their facility.

The organizations services approximately 69 different diagnoses of people, and they are incredibly excited to have the opportunity to make accessibility easier for their clients.

“It’s the most rewarding job, I think,” said Mills. “I just get so much enjoyment and reward out of it. Even though I don’t get to be in the thick of the program the way I used to be as the head instructor, I’m away from that now, but I know this is a very vital part of the program and I still feel it’s very rewarding.”

WETRA raises funds for programs in “spooktacular” fashion

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association (WETRA) raised some cash recently and had a spooky time doing it.

WETRA held its annual “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm” recently at its location near McGregor. Becky Mills, managing director at WETRA, said they were looking to have a family-friendly event 12 years ago and the idea was developed.

“We provide activities with the horses,” she said, noting WETRA assists those with disabilities.

Gracie Mills and her horse Toby prepare to enter the barn. They were both dressed for the “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm” that was presented by WETRA.

Gracie Mills and her horse Toby prepare to enter the barn. They were both dressed for the “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm” that was presented by WETRA.

The “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm” allowed children without disabilities to have a turn on WETRA’s horses, enjoy face painting, magic shows, balloon animals and other activities and even get some fire safety tips from Essex firefighters, as WETRA is located on North Malden Road, just east of Walker Road.

WETRA’s programs also include carriage driving and vocational work on the farm for those with disabilities.

“This is the biggest fundraiser all year,” said Mills.

The event usually brings in over $20,000 and sees over 2,000 people attend during the two days.

“We’re always trying to change it up a little bit and keep it new and fresh,” she said, adding the Headless Horseman is a popular attraction they do not change.

Magic shows were also part of the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association’s “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm.”

Magic shows were also part of the Windsor-Essex Therapeutic Riding Association’s “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm.”

Children from around the area attended with their parents and grandparents with many of the kids dressed in costume.

“We utilize about 70 volunteers per night,” said Mills. “Obviously without them, we couldn’t put on the event or do our programming.”

WETRA sees roughly 200 people use its programs each week with the volunteers a key part of that. Mills said people come from Amherstburg, Essex, LaSalle and Kingsville and even as far as Belle River and Leamington.

While the “Halloween Spooktacular on the Farm” is their biggest fundraiser, it is far from their only event. Mills said seven events have been held at WETRA this year.