Joe Meloche Ford

Career Compass team helps Joe Meloche Ford with canned food drive

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The canned food drive at Joe Meloche Ford benefited St. Joseph School, but received a helping hand from another area organization.

Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass joined the Ontario Disability Employment Network’s (ODEN) provincial campaign to promote Disability Employment Awareness Month (DEAM) and as part of it, helped Joe Meloche Ford with its can drive.

Joe Meloche Ford assists Career Compass by employing people with an intellectual disability, noted Career Compass team member Michelle Jones-Rousseau.

“They are an incredible and we want to give back to their cause,” said Jones-Rousseau.

The Career Compass team, a group under the Community Living Essex County umbrella, aided Joe Meloche Ford with a recent canned drive.

Joe Meloche Ford held its can drive during the month of October in partnership as part of the “WE Scare Hunger” campaign to assist food banks in local communities serving people who require food assistance. Canned goods and non-perishable food items were also be dropped off at Community Living Essex County’s four resource centers, including Channel Resource Centre in Amherstburg until Oct. 31. From there, all goods were taken by Career Compass team members to Joe Meloche Ford where they were collected with other canned goods and non-perishable food items before being delivered to River Canard.

“We’re trying to highlight an employer that helps us,” explained Derek Roy, manager of Community Living supports and leader of Career Compass.

To learn more about DEAM, be sure to like Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass Facebook page (Facebook.com/CLECareerCompass) and follow them on Twitter (@CLECareerCompass).

For more information about the services available to people with an intellectual disability and their families, contact Community Living Essex County at 519-776-6483 ext. 211, stop by the main office located at 372 Talbot St. North in Essex or e-mail droy@communitylivingessex.org.

“Lunch Mob” planned for Oct. 19 in support of hiring people with an Intellectual Disability

 

 

Special to the RTT

 

Community Living Essex County supports over 700 people who have an intellectual disability so that they may live in a state of dignity and share in all elements of living in their community with an opportunity to participate effectively. One element of living in a community is contributing through gainful and meaningful employment.

Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass has joined The Ontario Disability Employment Network’s (ODEN) provincial campaign to promote Disability Employment Awareness Month (DEAM) by choosing to host their second annual “Lunch Mob” at a local business that hires people with disabilities.

A Lunch Mob is based on the Cash Mob concept. A group of people converge on a business (in this case a restaurant) on a set date and time, buy a meal, meet other Lunch Mobbers, while supporting the chosen local business.

A “lunch mob” being held by Community Living Essex County will help benefit a “WE Scare Hunger” food drive being run out of Joe Meloche Ford Sales. The community is also welcome to attend Joe Meloche Ford with their food donations.

This Lunch Mob will be held at the Roma Club of Leamington, a business that has employed someone with an intellectual disability for over two years. The Roma Club is located at 19 Seacliff Drive East, Leamington. Members of the community are encouraged to stop by between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. for their lunch buffet on Friday, Oct. 19 to support this local business. Lunch is $14 after taxes. No RSVP is required.

Joe Meloche Ford in Amherstburg, another inclusive employer that has hired someone with an intellectual disability through Career Compass, is holding a can drive during the month of October in partnership with WE as part of the “WE Scare Hunger” campaign to assist food banks in local communities serving people who require food assistance. The proceeds from Joe Meloche Ford Sales’ food drive will be donated to St. Joseph Church in River Canard.

Lunch Mobbers are encouraged to donate canned goods or other non-perishable items when they join us for lunch to support their “WE Scare Hunger” campaign. These items will then be delivered to Joe Meloche Ford after the lunch. Canned goods can also be dropped off at one of Community Living Essex County’s four Resource Centers until Oct. 31.

To learn more about DEAM, be sure to like Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass Facebook page (Facebook.com/CLECareerCompass) and follow them on Twitter (@CLECareerCompass). For more information about the services available to people with an intellectual disability and their families, contact Community Living Essex County at 519-776-6483, or stop by the main office located at 372 Talbot St. North in Essex.

Local businesses voice concerns over vote to switch to Windsor police

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A number of local businesses were represented at town council Monday night with concerns over the town’s choice to switch from Amherstburg police to Windsor police.

Derek Didone, co-owner of County Towing, said he was representing a group of Amherstburg businesses and named Joe Meloche Ford, Racicot Chrysler, Uptown Body, Heritage Tire and Amherstburg GM.

“Over the years we have each built strong relationships with the community and the municipality,” said Didone.  “It is no secret that the Town of Amherstburg and its police service have always supported local small business.”

Didone said “it is clear that council had to make a very difficult decision” when choosing to contract the police service out to Windsor and “while we are confident that careful consideration was exercised when making this controversial decision, we have concerns that the potential for a negative economical impact on local small business may have been overlooked.”

The Amherstburg Police Service spends “tens of thousands of dollars on our products and services every year,” Didone stated. He said local businesses are given the opportunity to supply everything from office stationery to police cruisers.

“For many years my company has been contracted by the department to provide towing, recovery and impoundment services,” said Didone. “By making this change, we feel that we are at risk financially. As entrepreneurs, we understand it is important to save money where you can. This will apply under the new structure of the police service as well. Financial saving can be had when buying in bulk, consolidating services or elimination.”

Didone questioned whether local dealerships will be given an opportunity to bid on the sale of new cruisers and also wondered if local repair shops will lose a source of revenue if Windsor police maintains their vehicles in-house.

“There are local businesses such as mine that hold service contracts with the current department. When entering into a contract you make decisions and invest in equipment, stock and employees to uphold

our end of the agreement,” said Didone. “Will contracts like mine be upheld for the remainder of the term or will it become void in the transition? After all, I’m certain Windsor police have contracts in place for the same products and services.”

The concern of many business owners, Didone added, are even though there are savings for the municipality, will those savings be at the businesses’ expense?

“We all know that the Town of Amherstburg supports its community and local small business like no other,” he added. “Rest assured that you will have our continued support through this transition and hope that we have yours.

Didone asked what provisions will be included in the 20-year Windsor police contract to assure local small business owners will not lose revenue to businesses outside of the municipality. He also asked if local businesses can be assured “that a proportionate amount of Windsor police budgetary dollars will be spent on goods and services in this community?”

CAO John Miceli fielded both questions and said that Windsor police has its own procurement policy but the town can make recommendations to them. Miceli said the city has been good with listening to a number of issues with regards to the proposal.

“We can talk to them,” said Miceli. “I can’t guarantee anything.”

As for the second question, Miceli said local preference clauses are not legal.

Town council simply received Didone’s presentation.

Didone told the media afterword the result Monday night “is what it is” “but we’ll see what happens.”

“I’m sure they will go to bat for us so we can continue to do work out here. I hope Windsor is listening,” he added.

 

“Lunch Mob” planned for Oct. 31 in support of hiring people with an intellectual disability

 

 

Special to the RTT

 

Community Living Essex County supports over 700 people who have an intellectual disability so that they may live in a state of dignity and share in all elements of living in their community with an opportunity to participate effectively.

One element of living in a community is contributing through gainful and meaningful employment.

Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass has joined The Ontario Disability Employment Network’s (ODEN) provincial campaign to promote Disability Employment Awareness Month (DEAM) by choosing to host their first ever “Lunch Mob” at a local business that practices hiring people with disabilities.

A “Lunch Mob” is based on the “Cash Mob” concept. A group of people converge on a business (in this case a restaurant) on a set date and time, buy a meal, meet other “Lunch Mobbers,” while supporting the chosen local business.

This “Lunch Mob” will be held at Riccardo’s Italian Restaurant, a business that has employed someone with an intellectual disability for over two years. Riccardo’s is located at 65 Sandwich St. N. in Amherstburg.

Members of the community are encouraged to stop by between 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. for lunch Oct. 31. Please RSVP with Riccardo’s Italian Restaurant at 519-736-4333.

Right across the street, Joe Meloche Ford, another inclusive employer that has hired someone with an intellectual disability through Career Compass, is hosting a can drive in partnership with WE as part of the “WE Scare Hunger” campaign to assist food banks in local communities serving people who require food assistance.

“Lunch Mobbers” are encouraged to stop by Joe Meloche to also donate canned goods or other non-perishable items to support their “WE Scare Hunger” campaign.

To learn more about DEAM, be sure to like Community Living Essex County’s Career Compass Facebook page (Facebook.com/CLECareerCompass) and follow them on Twitter (@CLECareerCompass).

For more information about the services available to people with an intellectual disability and their families, contact Community Living Essex County at 519-776-6483, or stop by the main office located at 372 Talbot St. N. in Essex.

Local schools hold test drive events in conjunction with local dealerships

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Local schools stand to benefit after test drive events run in conjunction with Amherstburg car dealerships.

General Amherst High School was the latest to have a test drive event, holding a Buick Drive for your Students event May 13 at Amherstburg GM. Greg Scott, the fitness and leadership teacher, explained that it was the third such event run in conjunction with Amherstburg GM and that this one was put on by 15 of the students in that class.

“They are implementing the skills they learned on how to run an event,” said Scott.

Abby Gorgerat, Dakota Lucier and Avery Laliberty stand with one of the vehicles that was part of the recent “Drive One 4 UR School” test drive event held at Amherstburg Public School with the aid of Joe Meloche Ford.

Abby Gorgerat, Dakota Lucier and Avery Laliberty stand with one of the vehicles that was part of the recent “Drive One 4 UR School” test drive event held at Amherstburg Public School with the aid of Joe Meloche Ford.

Those who filled out a form and took a test drive got to donate to the club or team of their choice. The goal was $10,000.

“It’s been going pretty well,” he said. “People have been coming in and taking test drives.”

Students were out trying to raise awareness, and money, at local businesses including No Frills, Movati, Canadian Tire and Sobeys with people at those businesses encouraged to come out and take a test drive.

Scott said the other 15 students in the fitness and leadership class helped sign people out for the Run for Rocky, the result of that being that General Amherst won for having the most participation of any school. Their prize will be a June 2 pizza celebration.

“Kids in the class are getting a lot of practical experience running events and experience troubleshooting at something like this,” said Scott.

Students Alexis DeCarlo and Rachel Shiells said there was a lot of work done to prepare for last Saturday’s event. They promoted it through the school and by passing out flyers around the community. They also used social media to make people aware of it.

General Amherst’s fitness and leadership class helped organize a “Drive One for your Students” test drive event at Amherstburg GM. Students pictured include Danijela Dobrich, Alexis DeCarlo, Rachel Shiells, Jake Simone, Jackie Wismer and Emily Hamelin.

General Amherst’s fitness and leadership class helped organize a “Drive One for your Students” test drive event at Amherstburg GM. Students pictured include Danijela Dobrich, Alexis DeCarlo, Rachel Shiells, Jake Simone, Jackie Wismer and Emily Hamelin.

Amherstburg Public School was hoping to raise $6,000 at a Drive One for UR School test drive fundraiser two days earlier. That was run in partnership with Joe Meloche Ford.

“This is for the entire school,” said organizer and JK/SK teacher Aubrey Charlton. “Joe Meloche Ford assisted us.”

Charlton said they sent forms home with every student and hoped they would be returned. She explained that different programs and departments around Amherstburg Public School could benefit. That would include new gym equipment, technology and other supplies.

“We’re not asking for money from families. We’re just asking them to fill out forms,” said Charlton.

Charlton added that Ford of Canada has donated $4 million to Canadian schools.