Jeff Turner

Duke of Edinburgh pin award by cadet corps, new RSM takes helm

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The 202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps has a new cadet leading the corps while one of its civilian volunteers has received a prestigious award.

A special pin presentation of the Duke of Edinburgh gold award was made to William Eagleson-Borshuk, formerly a member of the #2715 RCAC out of Windsor and now a volunteer with the Amherstburg and Harrow corps. The presentation was made as part of a ceremony held at Amherstburg Public School.

“It took a long time to get,” the 18-year-old Eagleson-Borshuk stated. “It was two years of hard work.”

In order to get a Duke of Edinburgh gold award, Eagleson-Borshuk had to complete the requirements in four areas, including service, skills, physical recreation, adventurous journey and a residential project.

The age limits to qualify for such an award are from a person’s 14th birthday to their 25th birthday.

RSM Dylan Bezaire leads his corps on parade in the Amherstburg Public School gymnasium.

“This is an internationally recognized award,” said Eagleson-Borshuk.

Eagleson-Borshuk started the journey to get the Duke of Edinburgh gold award while as a cadet in Windsor. It is a journey he hopes more youths will consider.

“I’d encourage anyone to do this,” he said. “Employers recognize the amount of work it takes to do this.”

Cadets or civilians can pursue a Duke of Edinburgh award, he added.

The 202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps also has a new Regiment Sergeant Major (RSM). Master Warrant Officer Dylan Bezaire received his new duties as RSM as part of a change of command ceremony held the same night.

Bezaire said he was proud to become RSM and lead the parades.

Capt. Jeff Turner presents William Eagleson-Borshuk with a ring from the Masonic Lodge as part of the recognition Eagleson-Borshuk received for his Duke of Edinburgh Award.

“It’s a good feeling to achieve the goal I wanted to achieve,” he said.

Bezaire has been a local cadet for four years, starting when he was 12-years-old. He was pleased to see his hard work and dedication pay off.

The 202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps train Wednesday evenings at Amherstburg Public School. For more information on the corps, call 519-736-4900 or e-mail 202fortmaldenrcac@gmail.com.

Cadets hold annual mess dinner with addition of friends, family, members of parliament

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

With more than 120 guests in attendance, including Essex MP Tracey Ramsey and MPP Taras Natyshak, the 202nd Fort Malden Windsor regiment Army Cadet Corps held their annual mess dinner, which also wrapped up their annual canned good drive.

“It’s actually a training night for cadets,” explained captain commanding officer, Jeff Turner. “It gives them the opportunity to see what a mess dinner is all about, how to behave, how to eat, how they have to march in, what they have to do with toasts, how to say grace and just basically how to socialize during a military mess dinner.”

Turner explained, previously the dinner was strictly for cadets, staff and selected guests such as past commanding officers. This year however, they allowed cadets to invite parents and a guest of their own choices.

The dinner was what Turner called a “traditional roast beef dinner,” cooked by the Legion and paid for by the support committee to ensure there was no cost to the cadets or the guests.

The 202nd Fort Malden Windsor regiment Army Cadet Corps held their annual mess dinner Dec. 20, with MP Tracey Ramsey and MPP Taras Natyshak in attendance. The evening also wrapped up their canned goods drive, which were donated to the Amherstburg Food and Fellowship Mission.

During the dinner, cadets were also presented with a number of awards, one of them being from the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 157 pertaining to what the cadets and staff did during the poppy campaign and Remembrance Day activities. Another award was a certificate of recognition on behalf of Ramsey’s office.

“It’s a recognition of the work they have been doing throughout the year and what they have been achieving as they have been ranking up and everything that they are working on,” said Ramsey. “It’s just a small token for them to have to show the appreciation from the federal government for what they are doing for our country. It’s something that we do at the federal and provincial level just to thank people in the community for the work that they do and I just thought it would be nice for the cadets to have that tonight.”

For fun, the cadets also participated in a gift exchange. The evening also saw the end of their canned good collection, which was donated to the Amherstburg Food and Fellowship Mission.

“It’s important for us to be here to honor them and to thank the leadership and thank the families and parents,” explained Natyshak. “The program instills such wonderful values, duty and responsibility, and respect and service. Any youth who has those values at their core by any standards is doing great so we want to thank them and congratulate them and celebrate the holidays as well.”

202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadets recognized in 40th annual review

 

 

By Jolene Perron
Before the 202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadets are sent off to summer camp, they were reviewed and recognized for their training June 14.

“The presentation today is the accumulation of the entire year of work that the cadets have put together,” explained Captain Commanding Officer of the 202nd Fort Malden Windsor regiment Army Cadet Core, Jeff Turner. “All their training and everything comes down to one night where they get to showcase their talents to their parents, their families, their friends, their commanding officer, their staff, their volunteer people, basically the community in general.”
CO.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary, a group of cadets from two different cores, sponsored by the Essex and Kent regiments, are touring around the county to play for other cores.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary, a group of cadets from two different corps, sponsored by the Essex and Kent regiments, are touring around the county to play for other corps.

Turner explained in addition to the cadets being able to showcase their talents, a handful of them are also recognized for going above and beyond. He said all of the cadets are good, however some of them take an extra step to do a little bit more and deserve to be recognized for their efforts.
The Cadets who won awards are as follows:

Best First Year Cadet
Cdt. Garant

Deputy Commanding Officer’s Award, Best Second Year Cadet
Cpl. Bisson

 

Best Junior NCO Award
M. Cpl. Howard

Major John Brown, Most Improved Cadet Award
Cpl. Matlock

Pat Thrasher Memorial Award
MWO Bezaire

Best Attendance
MWO. Bezaire

Top Marksman
M. Cpl. Stratichuk

Community Service Award
Mcpl. Howard

Roy Northrup, Best Senior NCO Award
WO Ashton

Commanding Officer’s Award
CWO Holborn

Best Overall Cadet
WO Ashton

 

202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadets had their annual review June 14 in the gym of Amherstburg Public School, in front of an audience of family and friends, as well as their commanding officers and corps personnel.

202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadets had their annual review June 14 in the gym of Amherstburg Public School, in front of an audience of family and friends, as well as their commanding officers and corps personnel.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th celebration this year, a band was on site to march with the cadets, as well as showcase some of their skills as well.

“The band was a new one tonight and that’s really cool, it’s a group of cadets from two different corps, the cores are sponsored by the Essex and Kent regiments,” said Turner. “I was talking to one of the other commanding officers a couple of months back, and he said ‘we have a band, you want them to come out?’ and I said that would be awesome. It was absolutely fantastic and it adds to the night.”

Captain Richard Girard CD Ret. was also present at the reviewing June 14. He served a total of 17 years in the force, and was one of the original officers to begin the cadet corps. Turner explained they invite commanding officers back every year to see the current CO. is doing the right job and ensuring the corps is in good hands. He said “they put all the time in years ago, this is their legacy.”

For more information about the 202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadets, contact the regiment at 519-736-4900.

Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 celebrates 95th birthday of World War II veteran

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Nearly 80 people stopped by Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 last week to wish Doug Ramsay a happy birthday.

Ramsay, who served as a private in the Essex-Scottish Regiment from 1939-45 in World War II, turned 95 last Wednesday (March 15) and the local Legion held a party in his honour. Ramsay received the Netherlands Commemorative Medal of Liberation and a medal recognizing Canada’s 150th birthday during the ceremonial portion of the afternoon with local dignitaries also recognizing Ramsay as well.

Cornelis and Tina Heeren present Doug Ramsay the Netherlands Commemorative Medal of Liberation.

Cornelis and Tina Heeren present Doug Ramsay the Netherlands Commemorative Medal of Liberation.

Ramsay said it was recognition he didn’t see coming.

“It was a surprise,” he said. “I thought I was coming down to have a few beers with the boys.”

Ramsay was accompanied by sons Duncan and Peter as he accepted his awards with his sons also surprised by the ceremony.

“There’s a lot more to it than we were expecting,” said Peter.

Duncan said the ceremony was “very special” and said his father was overwhelmed, adding his father is a humble person.

Long lives run in the family, Duncan added, noting Doug’s father lived until he was 100-years-old and his mother died when she was 98-years-old.

Legion members, dignitaries and other veterans joined in wishing Doug Ramsay (second from right) a happy 95th birthday March 15.

Legion members, dignitaries and other veterans joined in wishing Doug Ramsay (second from right) a happy 95th birthday March 15.

“He has longevity in his family,” said Duncan.

Capt. Jeff Turner, who acted as master of ceremonies for the formal portion of the afternoon, praised Ramsay for his bravery, dedication to the cause and humble nature. Turner said Ramsay sets an example people can emulate daily.

Turner also pointed out Ramsay has served with the Legion for over 66 years.

Cornelis and Tina Heeren presented Ramsay the Netherlands Commemorative Medal of Liberation as Cornelis is a veteran of the Dutch army. Bruce Tribute, Sgt. At Arms with Legion Br. 255 in Riverside, presented Ramsay the Canada 150 medal.

Sgt.-at-Arms Bruce Tribute (left) from Legion Br. 255 in Riverside presents Doug Ramsay a Canada 150 medal.

Sgt.-at-Arms Bruce Tribute (left) from Legion Br. 255 in Riverside presents Doug Ramsay a Canada 150 medal.

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo presented Ramsay a framed certificate from the town of Amherstburg and thanked Ramsay for his service to Amherstburg and to Canada.

“Happy 95th birthday,” said DiCarlo. “I hope we’re hear to celebrate your 100th birthday.”

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo presents Doug Ramsay a certificate from the

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo presents Doug Ramsay a certificate from the

Patti Hayes represented Essex MPP Taras Natyshak and praised Ramsay for his dedicated service to the Royal Canadian Legion. She added that Ramsay is an inspiration for future generations.

Essex MP Tracey Ramsey was in England and unable to attend last Wednesday’s event, but federal recognition for the 95-year-old veteran is still expected.

202nd Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps changes command

 

By Jonathan Martin

A local army cadet has been handed a pace stick.

Chief Warrant Officer Grant Holborn was promoted to Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) during a ceremony held at Amherstburg Public School last Wednesday evening.

For the past two years, the RSM’s duties were performed by Chief Warrant Officer Aaron Wharram. Before a uniformed corps standing in careful formation and an audience of parents, siblings and officers, the plain-clothed Wharram presented the pace stick – a symbol of the rank’s honours and responsibilities – to his successor.

“I remember when I was first a green star (a new recruit),” said Wharram. “I was looking up going, ‘Man, I wish I could be one of those guys.’ And then three or four years later there I was holding the RSM stick.”

Wharram said he feels like his time with the cadets has passed, though he still wants to return for a visit every so often. He plans to dedicate himself fully to his studies. Next year, he hopes to join the convergence journalism program at St. Clair College. He said he is confident that he is leaving his corps in capable hands.

“I wanted to give this away to someone who really deserved it,” he said. “Holborn has worked hard and has proven himself. I know he’s ready.”

Holborn had no qualms about his own readiness to step into his new duties.

“I’ve had two years of preparation for it as CSM (Company Sergeant Major),” said Holborn. “I feel like I’ve worked my way up to it. I’m ready to carry on with the responsibilities it has.”

Chief Warrant Officer Grant Holborn (left) smiles after taking over the duties of Regimental Sergeant Major from Chief Warrant Officer Aaron Wharram (centre) under the guidance of Captain Jeff Turner (right) at Amherstburg Public School last Wednesday night. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Chief Warrant Officer Grant Holborn (left) smiles after taking over the duties of Regimental Sergeant Major from Chief Warrant Officer Aaron Wharram (centre) under the guidance of Captain Jeff Turner (right) at Amherstburg Public School last Wednesday night. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Captain Jeff Turner, the corps’ commanding officer, said Holborn’s readiness to jump into his new role is not happenstance. He said a prospective RSM is chosen early-on. The corps’ “best cadet” is usually “groomed” for the position over the course of years.

“(Holborn) is 18 now, so he’ll hold the RSM position until he ages out,” said Turner. “Then there will be another ceremony like there was tonight and hopefully another cadet will step up to the plate.”

“(Holborn) is a very smart young chap,” said Captain Richard Girard, one of the first commanding officers of the Amherstburg corps. “He’s going to do great things. It always surprises me what these kids can, but don’t believe they can do.”

Girard has been involved with the corps since its rebirth in September 1977, following a disbanding in 1968 or 1969 according to documents kept in the Marsh Collection.

Today, Girard stays active with the cadets by presenting promotions like those awarded to Alexa Bisson and Kameron Matlock. Both cadets were recognized in Wednesday’s ceremony.

“I love being part of the cadets,” Girard said. “It feels great seeing these young people achieving the things they’ve worked so hard for.”