Jason Lavigne

Angstrom Cr. residents fed up with condition of roadway

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Residents of Angstrom Dr. have had it with the condition of their road and want the town to make it a priority.

The roadway has fallen into disrepair with residents along the street, which runs off of Pointe West Dr., stating they and other neighbours have suffered injuries due to the concrete road cracking and heaving.

A group of concerned neighbours met with the RTT last Wednesday evening and also attended Monday night’s town council meeting. At the latter, council members voiced sympathy to the residents’ plight and will conduct a further investigation into the matter but some were quick to point out other roads need tending to as well.

Zane Handysides represented residents at Monday night’s meeting, telling town council “the road is getting worse as time goes on.”

“It’s becoming a liability for homeowners,” he said. “We just want our road to be repaired. It’s simply disintegrating around us.”

Handysides said they are “looking for a long-term solution” and “we need to get that road on the replacement side, not the repair side. The road is, quite frankly, embarrassing and I believe, unsafe.”

Residents recalled stories to the RTT last week of meeting with prior mayors and council members but not getting anything but patchwork to the road in return.

“I called 13 years ago when I first moved in,” said Nicole Sekela. “I couldn’t believe the state of the road.”

Residents of Angstrom Cr. are looking for
replacement of their road. They note the cement road is cracking and heaving and repairs aren’t doing anything positive.

Roger Racette, another resident on the street, claimed that he has had to replace springs and the sway bar on his vehicle twice due to the state of the road.

Racette said he brought a chunk of concrete to town hall before while said Sekela she called the town daily at one point to seek action. Sekela added that while residents in the rural areas have noise concerns over rumble strips, the cracks along their road make noise too.

“It sounds like someone has a flat tire when they go by,” she said.

Todd Laliberte believes the fact the road is currently concrete works against him, though neighbours believe it would just have to be cut six inches from the curb and removed. The residents say they are simply looking for asphalt.

The residents want Angstrom Dr. moved up on the town’s list of priorities for repair. Patching the road doesn’t work, they state, with Handysides stating last week that it eventually comes up and ends up on their front lawns.

“We’re not looking for anything special,” he said. “Just a normal, paved, asphalt road.”

“We can’t drive straight,” added Sekela last Wednesday, noting they weave around heaving concrete and holes to get off their road.

The road has dropped on the roads needs study, with numbers ranging from 170 to 183, Monday night in terms of where it is placed.

Todd Hewitt, manager of engineering for the town, said some roads are divided into several sections so the same road could be on there multiple times. He said the study was done in 2016 by an independent consultant.

“I’m not disagreeing that the road is in disrepair,” he told council Monday night, but added there are “a number of roads ahead of Angstrom Cr. in the study.

Hewitt gave a rough estimate of $350,000-$400,000 to fix Angstrom Cr.

Residents have been erecting signage along Angstrom Cr. to urge the town to replace the street. (Submitted photo)

Councillor Rick Fryer, who has raised the state of the road before at town council meetings, said the road is “pathetic” and believes it has been forgotten about. He said he was “sick and tired” of hearing of people getting hurt on that road.

“I got hurt on a section of sidewalk that wasn’t repaired by the town,” he reminded his council colleagues.

Fryer added that the town has gone down the roads needs study before and planned to re-do roads that were not at the top of it, citing Creek Road, though public works said Creek Road was second and fifth in the study as it was divided into two sections.

Councillor Jason Lavigne noted there have been recent pleas to look at other roads at recent council meetings, as Concession 2 North and South Riverview Dr. have been discussed at previous meetings. Lavigne acknowledged he is a former Angstrom Cr. resident and said the road is in “horrible condition.” He added his belief that previous councils didn’t spend the money they should have on roads and now the town faces a cost of about $260 million to repair them.

“There’s a lot of road issues we’ve inherited,” he said.

Councillor Leo Meloche agreed there are other roads that need attention, stating he knows of another road where he said Canada Post won’t even go down it to deliver mail.

“This council is trying to allocate funds to do major repairs and stop band-aid solutions,” said Mayor Aldo DiCarlo. “We definitely hear (the residents’) point and administration will bring back a report.”

 

 

Parks committee wants remaining Centennial Park acreage put back in parkland inventory

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The town’s parks and recreation advisory committee wants to ensure that at least part of Centennial Park remains Centennial Park.

The committee will be recommending to town council that the 12 acres of Centennial Park that wasn’t sold to the Greater Essex County District School Board return to the parks inventory. There has been concern over the fate of the land after the other 15 acres was sold to the public school board to accommodate a new high school.

The parks and recreation advisory committee met last Wednesday night in the council chambers with CAO John Miceli and Mayor Aldo DiCarlo at the opposite end of the chamber ready to address questions. Miceli maintained that the parks master plan, which lists Centennial Park as “N/A” by the consultants, is not finalized and “those 12 acres could be added back into the inventory.”

Councillor Diane Pouget, who is one of two council members on the committee as well as Councillor Jason Lavigne, indicated she didn’t recall any previous statements by Miceli that the 12 acres could be reinserted.

“Unless I’m deaf or hard of hearing, not once did I hear you say it could be added back into the plan,” Pouget told Miceli.

Dante Pagliaroli, who chairs the committee, noted he met with Miceli and that the town still has use of the pool until November and that there was “no plan and nothing definite” for the 12 acres on the north end of the park. Vice chair Pat Catton questioned why the 12 acres was removed from the parks inventory to begin with.

“To remove them, it seems premature,” said Catton. “I don’t understand the prematurity.”

Miceli maintained that the parks master plan remains in draft form and that it shows Amherstburg has an “abundance” of parkland. He reiterated that adding the 12 acres back into the plan “is not a problem.”

“Why take it out in the first place?” Catton pressed.

Miceli responded that the town offered land at Centennial Park and the Libro Centre for the public high school and that if there were errors made in the plan, “we’ll get them adjusted.”
Alex Smith, whose father was H. Murray Smith for whom Centennial Park was named, said he is “adamantly opposed” to any thought of getting rid of the park entirely.

Smith indicated he is in possession of bylaws and related documentation regarding the park being named for his father, a former mayor.

“If you want to test me, test me,” he said.

Smith also wanted to know who approved removing the park from the town’s inventory of parkland.

“I guess it goes to show when someone goes and does something for the town and has been gone for 21 years, you just forget about him,” he said.

Larry Bertrand worried about traffic in the area of Centennial Park when the school is built, adding he lives in the area and “I can’t back out of my driveway now.” Lavigne said the previous council identified moving recreational amenities to the Libro Centre, such as the baseball diamonds, and that it was the school board and the province that wanted Centennial Park.

“The location was chosen by the school board,” he stated, adding the town risked losing the school had they not gone along with it.

Rick Murray stated the issue was the 12 acres and the fact residents “want it back in the master plan. It should be designated as it was before.” Murray said it should stay recreational “which is what the property is designated for.”

Murray added his belief that the park should not be sold as excess land and continue as a recreational site in Murray Smith’s memory.

Lavigne said nothing has been removed and that there are no “behind the scenes” activity going on otherwise.

“If the public decides we want that as a park, no problem. No problem at all,” said Lavigne.

Pouget thanked the residents in attendance for supporting the notion to keep Centennial Park’s 12 remaining acres as parkland but Gord Freeman wondered why there was an in-camera meeting on the issue. Freeman believed that unless a sale was under discussion, the future of the park’s usage should have been done publicly.

Miceli questioned what motion Freeman was referring to and questioned where he was getting his information.

“I’m just assuming,” responded Freeman, “so I’m asking a question.”

John Corbett asked if the new high school has to expand at some point in the future, where they would expand to if the 12 acres are no longer available. He said General Amherst students have been “shortchanged” as it relates to available fields and now they would have to go to the Libro Centre.

Miceli said Centennial Park “has been mismanaged by the town for the last 40 years” and the current council wants to centralize uses at the Libro Centre.

The committee discussed possibly using the 12 acres for a splash pad, tennis courts and other features currently at Centennial Park. Lavigne said some of those could go on the high school’s property, noting the town doesn’t know the plans for the remaining 15 acres after the school itself has been built. Lavigne added that there are no plans for a track at the new school site “even if there was 100 acres.”

There is also 84 acres at the Libro Centre that can be further utilized for recreational purposes.

Food truck gets exemption, town to examine bylaw

 

By Ron Giofu

A local food truck operator is getting relief from a licensing bylaw pertaining to refreshment vehicles with the town to further examine that bylaw.

Bill Deslippe, owner of Smashed Apple Gourmet Catering, will be allowed to operate his food truck within 25 metres of other restaurants this year, down from the 200 metres the bylaw states. The town will look at lowering that limit for others, likely on a case-by-case basis, but the full bylaw will come back later this year for review.

Deslippe appeared before town council April 9 asking for relief from the bylaw. He said his intention is to operate his food truck one day per week as the catering end of his business keeps him busy the other days of the week. He is looking for a space, likely on Sandwich St. S., and has had discussions about locating his truck in existing store parking lots.

“We all know 200 metres is pretty far,” he said, referring to the existing bylaw. “I’m just asking for a shorter distance.”

Manager of licensing services Nicole Rubli said a preliminary look at bylaws from other municipalities show anywhere from 25-250 metres as setbacks.

Councillor Jason Lavigne, a former restaurant owner himself, said Smashed Apple is “wildly popular” and that Deslippe is “really well established” within Essex County. Lavigne said that Deslippe has set up shop in places like Toddy Jones Park and he hasn’t heard of one complaint.

Rubli did note she has heard from businesses about food trucks not abiding by setback requirements, however.

Deslippe told council that while he is shutting down his storefront on Sandwich St. S., he will continue catering, operating the food truck and will also launch a YouTube channel to promote the Smashed Apple brand as well as the town. He added that he wants to push local tourism and CAO John Miceli encouraged town council to take a full look at the bylaw so that tourism opportunities could be explored.

Deslippe added that competition is great and drives people to the streets, something Councillor Leo Meloche agreed with.

“Competition is not a bad thing. Competition is a good thing,” said Meloche. “People love options.”

The vote to allow the exemption and to also further study the bylaw passed by a 5-1 recorded vote. Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale and councillors Lavigne, Meloche, Rick Fryer and Joan Courtney were in favour while Councillor Diane Pouget was opposed. Mayor Aldo DiCarlo was absent.

Pouget said she wants Deslippe to succeed, but she was concerned about other restaurants, particularly if an exemption was passed on short notice.

“The problem is I don’t want to blindside other restaurants,” she said.

Town council’s remuneration report for 2017 released

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

How much money were your elected officials paid in 2017?

The answer was revealed as part of the agenda for the March 19 town council meeting. Treasurer Justin Rousseau stated in his report to town council that municipal treasurers are required under Section 284 of the Municipal Act to provide their councils “an itemized statement of remuneration and expense payments in the previous year.”

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo’s total remuneration was $45,071.97 for 2017. That includes his salary at $32,506.70 with the remainder including his $7,040 in remuneration (salary, meeting fees and travel/mileage) from being on the Essex Powerlines board as well as his communication allowance, per diem, public reception and travel and mileage from the town. He also earned $1,200 for being on the Amherstburg Police Service Board (APSB).

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale’s remuneration for 2017 was $22,430.90. The salary for being deputy mayor is $21,658.25 with the remainder being his legal fees, communication allowance, public receptions and travel and mileage.

All councillors earned a salary of $18,141.05.

The total remuneration for Councillor Rick Fryer was $22,303.87. That includes his salary, communication allowance and public receptions. Also included is Fryer’s remuneration for being on the ERCA board of directors, where he serves as the chair. His honorarium, per diem and mileage for being on the ERCA board totalled $2,767.

Councillor Joan Courtney’s total remuneration for 2017 was $22,071.56 That included her salary and the other associated expenses such as her communication allowance, training and conferences as well as her travel and mileage.

A total remuneration total of $21,533.09 was attributed to Councillor Leo Meloche for 2017. That included his salary plus his communication allowance, public receptions, training and conferences and travel and mileage.

Councillor Diane Pouget’s total 2017 remuneration was $19,869.39. That included her salary plus communication and legal fees.

Councillor Jason Lavigne had a total remuneration of $19,386.02. That includes his salary plus public receptions as well as his $1,200 honorarium for being on the APSB.

Also receiving $1,200 APSB honorariums were Bob Rozankovic and Patricia Simone. Ron Sutherland received $1,150.80 for his mileage and per diem being Amherstburg’s second appointee to the ERCA board of directors.

Appointees to the committee of adjustment who received $975 in 2017 included Sherry Ducedre, Duncan Smith and Donald Shaw while Michael Prue and David Cozens each earned $900. Simon Chamely and Shirley Curson-Prue from the heritage committee went to the Ontario Heritage Conference last year and their expenses were $1,511.94 and $1,668.14 respectively. William Whittal’s honorarium for being on the accessibility committee was $300 for the year while the honorariums, training and mileage expenses for the drainage board members – Robert Bezaire, Brad Laramie, Allan Major, Bob Pillon and Ron Sutherland – totalled $4,663.97 for 2016.

Town council votes to contract out policing services to Windsor

 

By Ron Giofu

 

In a decision that drew boos and catcalls from the audience, Amherstburg town council is switching its’ policing services to Windsor.

Town council voted 3-2 Monday night to enter into a 20-year contract with the Windsor Police Service in a meeting that lasted only about 30 minutes. Voting in favour were Mayor Aldo DiCarlo and councillors Leo Meloche and Rick Fryer.

Councillors Joan Courtney and Jason Lavigne were opposed.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale and Councillor Diane Pouget did not vote due to being in conflict. Pouget was there in person, declaring conflict due to her son-in-law being a member of the Windsor Police Service while DiPasquale was absent from the meeting.

DiCarlo said that “we’ve hit the second last stage of the process,” noting that the switch from the Amherstburg Police Service to the Windsor Police Service still has to be approved by the Ontario Civilian Police Commission (OCPC). That could come by 2019, when the contract with Windsor is due to begin.

“Obviously, some things are going to hinge on the approval of the province,” the mayor stated.

The switch is believed to amount to over $567,000 in annual savings but DiCarlo said that could amount to $18-20 million over 20 years, including the long-term post-retirement benefits that Windsor taxpayers will now absorb.

DiCarlo said he heard from many residents that wanted to switch to Windsor and for the town to save money on policing. Cost savings and cost containment were the reasons he said he voted in favour of the switch, noting Windsor committed to cost parity and the savings “could actually go up” in the future.

A report from CAO John Miceli stated: “The Windsor Police will guarantee cost parity will exist between the annual operating budget of the Windsor Police Service and the cost of contract policing the Town of Amherstburg. This guarantee of budgetary parity would commence in year six and be honoured throughout the twenty year commitment for policing services, subject to renewal every five years.”

Many decisions the town makes are now looked at not just for the immediate future, but for 15-20 years down the road, the mayor said.

Acknowledging that he fielded threats from the public that warned they would not vote for him if he voted to switch, DiCarlo said he has never voted on an issue just to win votes regardless of what position he was in.

“I can honestly say I’ve never voted with the intent of getting re-elected,” he said.

While Windsor police will provide a wide array of services for free, DiCarlo said the OPP has changed their billing model and there was concern that the Amherstburg Police Service could start getting billed in the future if OPP services were needed.

“This was a couple of municipalities that saw the benefits for both of us,” he said of Windsor and Amherstburg. “For Amherstburg, we get the same level of policing for less money.”

DiCarlo balked when asked if this could lead to regional policing in Windsor-Essex County, but said he has heard that other municipalities in the area are “watching to see what happens.”

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo speaks to the media after the Feb. 26 vote that saw council vote 3-2 to contract policing services to Windsor. DiCarlo and councillors Leo Meloche and Rick Fryer were in favor. Voting in opposition were Councillor Jason Lavigne and Councillor Joan Courtney.

Lavigne said the issue has “consumed quite a bit of our lives” from both a council and administration perspective to the public point of view as well.

“It’s been a very difficult decision to have been placed on our shoulders,” he said. “I’ll respect the decision of council. I won’t criticize it.”

Stating that administration “did a good job” and calling the Windsor police proposal “sound,” Lavigne said he was opposed to switching because he didn’t hear from very many people who supported it. He said people want to keep the Amherstburg Police Service and he was going to listen to them.

“I was put here because of the people in the community,” said Lavigne. “People can claim silent majorities all they want to. The majority of people are saying to me that they don’t care about the costs, they want to support their local police.”

Lavigne said the town has spent money on property acquisitions and new hires this term but want to save money in the area of policing. Acknowledging he has been accused of bias because he is on the Amherstburg Police Services Board, he added that Amherstburg police is efficient and the community is safe.

“(The public) has told me they are comfortable with what we have,” said Lavigne.

Meloche said a lot of communities are struggling with police costs and he took the approach that the town’s financial sustainability has to be considered.

“That’s the direction I took,” said Meloche.

Pointing out the town’s status as one of the safest in Canada, Meloche said that isn’t just about the police department.

“We have the safest community in Canada, and no disrespect to the police, it’s because of the people here,” said Meloche, drawing boos and moans from the crowd. “Don’t sell ourselves short. We’re law-abiding, safe people.”

Courtney said she had to be “true to myself” and said she considered the issue carefully.

“I vowed I would listen to the people,” said Courtney.

Most of the comments Courtney said she heard were “we want to keep our local police service” and that was the “overwhelming message” she received.

“Do I think it’s a good contract? Yes, I do,” she said of the Windsor police proposal. “Will it save money? Yes, it will.”

Courtney said she would respect the decision and believed Amherstburg will continue to be a “vibrant” town.

Finances were at the forefront of Fryer’s comments.

“We do have fiduciary responsibilities as a council,” Fryer stated.

Fryer said it was “a great contract for the town,” and pointed out the issue dates back to one of council’s first meetings of the term. The town has reduced its debt, he noted, and believed switching will be the right road for the future.

There were only two delegations at the meeting, the first being from Neil Stewart. Stewart had concerns over HST cost and the fact that the recommendation from administration grew from what was thought to be a five-year proposal to a 20-year proposal.

Miceli said he was tasked with getting costs over a 10, 15 and 20-year period and stated that direction came as a result of the four public meetings with some concerned over savings over just a five-year period.

“I find it hard to believe those figures could come up in the last one, two or three weeks,” said Stewart. “It’s hard to believe that happened.”

“I’m sorry if you don’t believe that but that’s what happened,” said Miceli.

Stewart added his belief those costs should have been made public much sooner.

“I don’t believe we’ve been given the full facts,” he believed.

DiCarlo said the timing of the costings was what it was and there was no attempt to “sweeten” the deal to push it through.

Stewart also questioned the cost per capita, noting Windsor police is $480 per person and Amherstburg is $270. Miceli said Amherstburg’s costs will go down with a switch and that Windsor’s costs are higher because of the additional services they provide.

Pat Simone, noting she was speaking for herself and not representing any committee or board she is on, believed the decision should be deferred until a human rights complaint the Windsor Police Service is currently involved with is resolved.

A female officer is accusing Windsor police of passing her over for promotions based on gender, and Simone said Amherstburg officers would follow Windsor police policies and procedures in the event of a switch.

“I’m not saying it’s a women’s issue, but it’s a human rights issue. It concerns men and women,” said Simone.

After the meeting, residents were upset with council’s decision.

Jen Ozyer said the decision was simply about cost, and she questioned if it would improve the town.

“It’s not about making things better. How is it making it better?” she asked.

Trudy Dempsey said she was “really, really upset” with council’s decision.

“I really don’t think they took everything into consideration, all the meetings that people came to and said ‘no,” she said. “They already decided this long before tonight. That’s exactly how I see it.”

George Kritiotis noted it was one step in the process, noting the matter still has to be approved by the OCPC. He suggested the fight wasn’t over.

“That’s who makes the final decision,” he said.

A petition is at several local businesses and “I think there is a significant amount of people who are against it,” said Kritiotis. He added the fact Windsor and Amherstburg don’t share a border could work in the favour of those opposed to a switch.

“This is not a done deal,” said Kritiotis, adding that opponents may also bring up that it wasn’t a full council that voted.

Const. Shawn McCurdy, president of the Amherstburg Police Association, said the process has been stressful but that they will honour the decision.

“I’m still a little shocked about the decision,” said McCurdy.

McCurdy said the job of the association is to protect its members and they did that the best way they could.

“I can assure you the men and women with the Amherstburg Police Service will continue to do their jobs,” he said. “It’s a council decision.”

The association has no choice but to accept the decision, he conceded, adding that officers took an oath and they will continue to honour that oath.

Moving forward, the association will negotiate any severance payments that may be owed and continue to work on behalf of its members and the residents.

During the four public meetings on the subject, in which the majority of residents stated they favoured keeping Amherstburg police, Miceli noted that 23 per cent of the town’s budget is tied up in police costs.

The Windsor police proposal called for administering existing staff in existing organizational units, the continuation of service delivery, existing Amherstburg officers and staff “working exclusively” for Amherstburg, the town being able to keep the existing Amherstburg police station, and local officers continuing to respond to all calls for service.

While there was anger and disappointment from many in the public locally last night, town council’s decision was endorsed by Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkins.

“Way to go Amherstburg!” Dilkins stated on his Twitter account Monday night. “We look forward to providing enhanced policing services while saving the Town a lot of money. Your foresight is a win-win for residents in both of our municipalities.”