Gibson Gallery

“Exploring Kenya” by Brad Goldring now on exhibit at the Gibson Gallery

By Pat Bailey

 

Brad Goldring is totally focused on his first exhibition—at least for the moment.It’s amazing he finds the time to pursue his hobby—turned side hustle, into a beautiful exhibit at the Gibson Gallery.

At 33, Goldring has spent nearly two decades honing his craft—-one that began when he was just 14 and assisting his mom capturing her subjects on film. An artist in her own right, Debbie Goldring would turn the images captured by her son into commissioned portraits of her subjects—generally, dogs, cats and horses.

Debbie admits anyone can take a picture of a beloved pet but said at a young age Brad’s photos showed he definitely had a special gift. And Goldring credits his mom with encouraging his beginnings as a shutterbug.

“I still have my first original roll of film,” said Goldring, “of my cat in the backyard.”

Last Sunday, at a special reception at the gallery, Debbie, beaming with pride, was on hand to support her son in his first showing.

Goldring’s amazing photos feature his works from around the globe. But it’s the sheer strength and emotion captured while on safari in Kenya that steals the show.

African lions, giraffes and elephants grace the walls of the gallery, showcasing some of his finest works.

Despite being sidetracked by a little thing called university, the LaSalle resident, formerly of Milton, has managed to continue as a photographer while pursuing his career as an attorney/computer engineer for Ford Motor Company. In fact, it was law school that lured Goldring to the Essex County area, graduating from the dual American/Canadian law program between the University of Windsor and the University of Detroit Mercy.

While busy commuting between LaSalle and his Detroit-area job, Goldring still makes time to run a couple other businesses on the side, including photography.

Brad Goldring stands with some of his equipment and his work that is featured as part of his “Exploring Kenya” exhibit at the Gibson Gallery. His work is displayed through March 24. (RTT Photo by Pat Bailey)

While he says he failed to inherit any of his mother’s artistic ability, he said photography allows him a passion that also provides a creative outlet.How does someone possibly have time for so many pursuits? The secret said Goldring — “I don’t sleep.”

Instead he spends about 18 hours a day, working on the many facets of his careers.

In fact he had spent the morning driving from a business weekend in Chicago to the Amherstburg gallery for the reception.

While most would crumble under such a demanding schedule, Goldring flourishes.

He really couldn’t imagine his life any other way. But he is thinking ahead to his next ‘vacation’ — be it a working vacation.  For Goldring, whose goal one day is to have a photo published in a national wildlife magazine, he hopes a three-week trip to Africa will pay off.

In the meantime, he’s enjoying showcasing his works to a new audience and allowing others to go on safari vicariously through his works.
In his “spare” time, he will continue to show off his talent by shooting weddings, concerts and drag racing.

His photography has allowed him many opportunities he might not have otherwise enjoyed—including trips to Kenya, Tanzania, Jamaica, Cuba and Florida.

The exhibit, “Exploring Kenya: Brad Goldring”, will continue through March 24 and features Kenyan wildlife, but also includes a glimpse into his other photographic subjects–an album containing photos from the wedding of the son of the Governor General of Jamaica, drag races and concerts adorns the podium in front.

Goldring admits he enjoys seeing the reaction of others to the photos of his wildlife in particular, but said that all that really matters is that it makes him happy.

The Gibson Gallery is located at 140 Richmond St. and is open Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

For further information on the Gibson Gallery, call 519-736-2826 or visit their website at www.gibsonartgallery.com. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.

 

Holiday Art at the Gallery now open

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The holiday season is approaching at the Gibson Gallery is getting into the spirit.

The gallery’s “Holiday Art at the Gallery” opened Nov. 22 and runs through Dec. 9. The event acts as a mini-Art by the River with vendors and exhibitors coming in and offering their goods for people to buy.

“We have even more exhibitors this year,” explained Bonnie Deslippe, a board member with the Gibson Gallery.

Muriel King and Linda Jones were shopping at Holiday Art at the Gallery Nov. 23 at the Gibson Gallery.

Deslippe said there will be a nice variety of goods available at “Holiday Art at the Gallery” and pointed out there is no admission. She added that the Wednesday Guild will also be holding a raffle for some large afghans in conjunction with Holiday Art at the Gallery.

Holiday Art at the Gallery is the final event of the 2018 season at the Gibson Gallery. It was preceded by the Members Exhibit in which members of the Gibson Gallery got a chance to display their own work.

“It was a good exhibit,” said Deslippe. “There was a nice assortment. It’s always very eclectic.”

About 21 exhibitors took part, with paintings and sculptures among the work shown. Members are contacted and invited to participate and Deslippe said they then wait to see what comes in.

Deslippe said there was no real theme to the members’ exhibit, but “it’s always very interesting.”

The Gibson Gallery is located at 140 Richmond St. and is open Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Donations are welcome.

For further information on the Gibson Gallery, call 519-736-2826 or visit their website at www.gibsonartgallery.com. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.

“Ahoy! Amherstburg’s Marine Past” now on exhibit at the Gibson Gallery

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg has an extensive marine history and the Gibson Gallery is the place to go to learn more about it.

“Ahoy! Amherstburg’s Marine Past” is on exhibit at the Gibson Gallery through Oct. 21. It was co-ordinated by David Cozens, president of the Fort Malden Guild of Arts & Crafts board of directors, and a team of local residents who are no strangers to the water.

“I think it turned out very well,” Cozens said of the exhibit.

John Dupont, Cliff Morrison and David Cozens show a trophy that is part of the “Ahoy! Amherstburg’s Marine Past” exhibit now at the Gibson Gallery.

Cozens estimated that there are at least 75 artifacts on display, including an underwater diving suit that dates back to around 1880. There are also over 100 photographs around the gallery. He said when the River Town Times printed an article in early August appealing to the community to loan their materials to the exhibit, it was very helpful.

“We were overwhelmed by the response with photos and artifacts,” he said.

There are also fleet pennants displayed at the gallery including pennants from Canada Steamship Lines, Algoma Central and Lower Lakes Towing. The Ministry of Fisheries and Oceans also helped out, he stated.

An opening reception was held last Thursday evening and “we have at least four people here who worked for McQueen Marine,” Cozens said. He thanked Cliff Morrison, Al Jackson, John Dupont, Wes Ball and Dave Goodchild for their help with the exhibit as well as Meg Reiner from the Marsh Historical Collection.

Cozens explained that his love of the water and marine life dates back to his youth.

“When I moved to town in 1962, we moved into Capt. Penner’s house,” he said. “Our neighbour to the north was Capt. Hackett. Capt. McQueen was to the south of us. I’ve been a boat nerd ever since.”

He added: “To this day, if I hear a boat in the middle of the night, I have to get up and see what it is and where she’s from.”

David Goodchild and Al Jackson also worked at compiling materials for the exhibit, which runs through Oct. 21.

Cozens also thanked Ron Deneau for his financial support of the exhibit and all who helped make it possible. He said he felt it was important to preserve this piece of Amherstburg’s history and show it to the newcomers to town as well as for future generations.”

The Gibson Gallery is located at 140 Richmond St. and is open Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

For further information on the Gibson Gallery, call 519-736-2826 or visit their website at www.gibsonartgallery.com. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.

“Africa Revisted” comes to the Gibson Gallery

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Two years ago, Donovan Alp made his debut with his exhibit “Out of Africa” exhibit.

After some additional trips to South Africa, Alp has returned with “Africa Revisited.”

“This is the result of another couple of trips to South Africa,” Alp said during a Sunday afternoon reception.

Alp works in various different types of mediums with works being in painting, drawing and photographic form. They have been worked on the last several months, with Alp noting his most recent trip to South Africa being in April 2017.

A recent trip saw him visit four countries and five game reserves. Alp, who now lives in LaSalle, was originally born in Zimbabwe.

Donovan Alp stands with one of his works that are currently featured as part of the “Africa Revisited”
exhibit at the Gibson Gallery. The exhibit runs through Sept. 23.

“Every painting has a picture of a photo under it so you can see what I was working from,” he said.

Alp said he always has enjoyed going to game reserves and started painting the animals he was taking pictures of after he retired. He noted that some of the animals may not be around for the long term due to poaching and trophy hunting.

There are 16 new paintings or drawings part of “Africa Revisited” with one drawing that was in his 2016 show. Alp said he doesn’t show his work that often, with the two exhibits at the Gibson Gallery being his only one-person shows. He also submits work to Association of Representational Artists (ARA) shows.

“I just think it’s a wonderful gallery,” stated Alp. “It’s a wonderful place to exhibit.”

“Africa Revisited” will be on exhibit through Sept. 23.

The Gibson Gallery is located at 140 Richmond St. and their current hours are Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

For further information, call 519-736-2826 and or visit their website at www.gibsonartgallery.com. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.

 

Thousands attend Art by the River

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The 52nd annual Art by the River got off to a wet start but recovered nicely as the weekend went on.

The show, the largest fundraiser of the year for the Gibson Gallery, reported to have about 2,000 fewer people than last year due to early weather woes.

Saturday morning wasn’t ideal for Art by the River due to rain and wind, but things turned around by afternoon with crowds coming through to enjoy the over 150 artists and crafters that turned out to Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada.

However, according to Gibson Gallery board member and office administrator Bonnie Deslippe, the foul weather early on still didn’t stop some from attending.

“We had people lining up to come in,” said Deslippe.

People were coming through with umbrellas, she added, even though some crafters and artists were still in their tents.

Maria Jose paints a portrait during Art by the River last Saturday.

“I think there are people who really look forward to this every year,” she said.

The venue and the fact there are some one-of-a-kind items lends to the success of Art by the River, Deslippe added.

The only damage from the Saturday morning storm was pottery that was broken at one of the tents while another tent at the “Little Artists Workshop” blew away.

“We are still tired but very happy with the way the weekend turned out and are already planning next year,” said Deslippe. “A huge thankyou to all our dedicated volunteers. The event would not be possible without them and the support of the town and staff of Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada.”

Local author John Schlarbaum was attending again this year, in what is the tenth anniversary of the release of his book “Barry Jones’ Cold Dinner.” He had many of his other titles marked down to either $5 or $10 to mark the occasion.

“Unfortunately, it’s the one book that’s sold out,” he said.

Schlarbaum said he has been working to record a song that he wrote several years ago and is also trying to get his novella “Aging Gracefully Together” in production as a play.

“My hope is to get a local theatre group to put it on in the future,” he said.

Calista Papaefthimiou compete in the live art competition.

Schlarbaum states he is also in the early stages of a new book project involving his P.I Steve Cassidy character.

Art by the River is enjoyable, Schlarbaum added, as he said he meets people that he has seen there and at other shows.

“I end up meeting a lot of fans and new readers who hopefully enjoy the books,” he said.

Ross Stuart of Kingston entertained on the ukuleles he made. He said it was either his third or fourth year at Art by the River.

“It’s a great place to be,” he said. “The people are fabulous. The town is great.

The 52nd annual Art by the River was held Aug. 25-26 at Fort Malden National Historic Site. Char Pare of Amherstburg shows some of her work.

 

Stuart said he has been making his instruments for 12 years. He travels to this part of Ontario twice per year with the other stop being Art in the Park in Windsor.  He said it makes sense to do the same shows as people who thought about it or tried his instruments often come back to buy the next time they see him.

“Each piece is unique,” he said.

Stuart added he makes his instruments in groups and calls it “a labour of love.”

Dan St. Pierre and wife Carol of Amherstburg attended and created some of their “Miracle Magnets” magnetic therapy jewellery.

“We’ve been doing this since 2004,” said Dan. “When we got started, friends of ours picked up the methods in Texas and brought it up here.”

Dan explained that they make the jewellery themselves and that they ship as far as Kincardine and Ohio.

“We enjoy doing it. We love it,” he said, adding that people drop by their booth at Art by the River “just to say hello.” They have made friends at craft shows and renew old friendships.

Dan added that they’ve noticed that Art by the River doesn’t let just anyone in as a vendor.

Crowds go through Fort Malden National Historic Site during Art by the River.

“They want the best and it shows,” he said.

Char Pare of Amherstburg said it was her seventh Art by the River and she doesn’t do any other show.

“I think the quality of the show is extremely high,” she said. There is talent when going from tent-to-tent and “I think it’s encouraging to people.”

Calista Papaefthimiou and Trinity Hallett were two of the students competing against other students in a live art competition even during the storm. The duo, representing Sandwich Secondary School, came in third place behind Kaitie Lessard and Sallma Majthoub of St. Clair College and Wayne State University respectively and Sophia Fallea and Mandy Brunet of St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School Emily Roe and Laura Fontaine of the University of Windsor were honorable mentions.

“It’s cool,” said Papa, “to paint in those conditions.”

For additional photos, view our photo album.