Carl Gibb

Ribfest bringing ribs and entertainment to town this weekend

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

With free admission and parking, chair of the Rotary Ribfest committee Carl Gibb ensures this weekend will be a fun time.

“This is our 8th year and this year we have new bouncy rides for the kids and we have a rock climbing wall, and everything else is pretty well the same as we have had before,” said Gibb. “We will have four ribbers, they come from all over Ontario, and we have the Golden Onion, they come in out of Montreal so people are wanting to come here.”

Gibb said two years ago, they were up to 15,000 people at Ribfest.

In addition to the food and kids attractions, another big focal point of the Rib Fest is the entertainment. With a list of nine incredible bands this year, there won’t be a quiet moment.

Saturday dinner-time entertainers will be the Stanley Brown Blues Band. Hailing from London, the group has been playing for several years and have a wide range of music at their disposal. Stanley Brown himself brings more than 30 years of experience to the stage, which is rooted in blues styles including blues rock and swing blues.

“We’ve played Ribfest several times and were requested to come back this year,” said Brown. “We love playing this event and are very happy to be a part of it and watch it grow every year. It is a very well run event and they make it very easy and pleasant for us. Our band is very well received in Amherstburg.”

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Wrapping up the entertainment Saturday evening will be the Moondog Howlers Band, which is a rocking blues band. With a group of musicians who have played locally for some time, the band came together approximately six years ago with the goal of becoming an original recording act. Dwayne Purdy explains the summer opens up many outdoor festivals and they are fortunate to have been booked at Ribfest.

“Ollie Marcoux ran into us a few years ago in London,” said Purdy. “He was judging the IBC contest we had entered, and was very complimentary to us after our set, we have since changed our name. Stan Brown, whose talented band is also playing Ribfest, put in a good word to Ollie for us, which was very gracious on his part. However, Stan was using our current name, so Ollie didn’t realize it was us. Once he put two-and-two together, he chose to book us. We are so happy that he did.”

While the entertainment is free with your admission to the festival, any donations made to the Amherstburg Rotary Club are always appreciated. Gibb explained the funds raised last year were used to purchase more than 600 carbon monoxide detectors for low income residents and those people in need of carbon monoxide detectors in Amherstburg. He said it was a big expense, and every year they’re just going to pick a project put some money back into the community.

The ribs start grilling at Centennial Park Friday at noon and will stop Sunday at 7 p.m.

The Rotary’s Ribfest committee has also started its own Twitter feed. Find them on Twitter at @AburgRibfest.

Town council waives fees for Rotary Club’s Ribfest

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Rotary Club’s eighth annual Ribfest is this weekend and organizers received some financial relief thanks to town council.

The town has waived $2,035 in fees for the Ribfest, with $1,352 being parks fees and the rest for equipment rentals. The Ribfest committee was represented by chair Carl Gibb and Rotary Club past president Lena Lazanja.

“We are a charitable organization and all the funds we receive continue to be funneled back into town,” Lazanja told town council.

Councillor Leo Meloche stated he supported the Ribfest and didn’t have any problem with waiving the parks fees but was concerned about waiving the equipment fees. He said equipment suffers wear and tear and wanted to ensure the town has the resources to replace equipment when need be and believed “at some point we have to draw the line.”

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

The Amherstburg Rotary Club’s 2017 Ribfest is July 7-9.

“Unfortunately, the equipment – we use it and we have to replace it.”

Waiving the fees was an easy decision for Councillor Rick Fryer, pointing out that the Rotary Club has undertaken many projects that have benefitted the residents of Amherstburg. Fryer thanked the Rotary Club for its efforts over the years.

“If it was up to me, we can approve the waiving of the fees every single time,” said Fryer.

The Ribfest runs 12 p.m.-11 p.m. July 7 and 8 and 12 p.m.-7 p.m. July 9 at Centennial Park.

Economic Development Advisory Committee wants council to revisit Ribfest sign issue

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The town’s economic development advisory committee plans to appear before council to ask that the issue of the Rotary Ribfest sign issue be revisited.

The Ribfest committee, which operates under the umbrella of the Rotary Club of Amherstburg, asked for an extension from 14 days to 28 days prior to their July 7-9 event to better promote the festival but were refused at the March 22 meeting. A motion from Councillor Leo Meloche that night failed to get a seconder.

Carl Gibb, Ribfest committee chair, appeared before the economic development committee and noted the signs “are very important to us” and used the example of the Rotary Club’s recent pasta dinner to show how important signs are to them.

Without a roadside sign, Gibb told the committee that attendance dropped.

Gibb said they would put up ten larger signs around the town in the past and took them down immediately after the event. The club currently cannot have the smaller push-in lawn signs erected on homeowners’ properties as well.

“These are not ugly signs. They are not bristol board with magic marker,” said Gibb. “We spent a lot of money on these signs.”

It was “amazing” to Gibb that the push-in lawn signs are not allowed on residential property. He added they could put up signs in other communities, but not Amherstburg until 14 days before the event.

“It’s frustrating. I don’t know what we are going to do,” said Gibb. “If attendance is down, we may go to another municipality.”

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Gibb said that two weeks is “not enough” for people to be aware of an upcoming event. He said they are not trying to threaten council, but noted the committee puts a lot of time and effort planning the festival.

“If the numbers aren’t there, you can’t sustain it. That’s a fair statement and not a threat,” replied Meloche.

Manager of licensing and enforcement Nicole Rubli said that section of the bylaw has been in place since 2006. She noted the bylaw department is “complaint driven” and there were concerns about an abundance of signage last year with Communities in Bloom judges coming.

The town is participating in Communities in Bloom again this year. Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale pointed out that Communities in Bloom and Ribfest did not occur at the same time last year.

Rubli said there were also concerns about signs for multiple events being up simultaneously.

“Because the town is blessed with so many events, there could be a lot of signs up at one time essentially promoting six different events as timelines overlap,” she said.

Meloche believed such restrictions like the town has in place limits freedom of expression and believed it should be pointed out that the town risks losing Ribfest.

Carolyn Davies, president of the Amherstburg Chamber of Commerce and that organization’s appointee to the committee, wondered if distance between signs could resolve the issue.

“Maybe it’s a matter of limiting the number of signs,” she said.

Economic Development Advisory Committee chair Bob Rozankovic said the issue at hand was the 14-day extension.

“I support the bylaw the way it is. I support its intent,” said Rozankovic, but said the spirit of the bylaw must also be considered.

“This bylaw does create opportunities for exemptions,” said Rozankovic.

Rozankovic believed any court in the land would uphold an exemption, particularly for a worthy cause.

Davies said there was little to do in Amherstburg when she arrived 20 years ago and “by 2006, we still didn’t have very much.” Things have changed since 2006 and she believed the bylaw needs more updating, particularly since the tourism component to Amherstburg has evolved.

“I think this bylaw is archaic,” said Davies. “It needs to be redeveloped. We’re dealing with a different era than when it was written in 2006.”

The committee, led by Rozankovic, plan to appear before town council April 24 regarding extending the period for Ribfest signs to 28 days.

The Ribfest is scheduled for July 7-9 at Centennial Park.

No relief for Rotary Club under town’s sign bylaw

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Members of the Amherstburg Rotary Club are disappointed after town council did not grant them any relief from the sign bylaw.

Three members, all of whom are also on the Rotary Ribfest committee, appeared before council asking that they be allowed to have mobile signs and signs on residential and commercial properties for a 28-day period prior to their eighth annual Ribfest, which is scheduled for July 7-9 this year. Ribfest committee chair Carl Gibb, Rotary president Laura George-Jurilj and Tony Ross appeared at Monday night’s meeting.

Currently, they can only put out signs 14 days in advance of their events and based on the lack of seconder for a motion by Councillor Leo Meloche asking for the 28-day period, those restrictions will stay in place. They are not allowed portable signs, with event signs only allowed on commercial properties.

“The Ribfest Committee is totally opposed to these regulations. They are too restrictive and they pose a problem in getting people to come to our event,” said Gibb.

Gibb said the Ribfest has not presented any problems and has brought thousands of people to Amherstburg.

“These signs that we put up are professionally made by a local business,” said Gibb. “Fourteen days is not long enough to properly advertise an event. It is a known fact that you have to pass a road sign three times to know what it actually says.”

The Rotary Club has spent “considerable money” in acquiring the signs “and now we cannot use them.” He said until last year, they have put up signs four weeks prior to the event and removed them the day after.

“Two years ago, we had 15,000 people. Last year, we had just over 10,000. Is this a result of your restrictions on our advertising? Quite likely, some of it,” said Gibb. “It is ironic that we can put up any of our signs in Harrow, Kingsville, Leamington, Cottam, Essex, Lakeshore, LaSalle and even Windsor. How many phone calls, how many complaints we’ve had? Zero.”

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Members of the Rotary Ribfest Committee, an event that operates under the umbrella of the Amherstburg Rotary Club, are disappointed with the guidelines they have to operate under to comply with the sign bylaw. Town council upheld the current sign bylaw at the March 20 meeting.

Gibb said some businesses told him they make more money in sales during the Ribfest weekend than any other summer weekend. Banners over Sandwich St. S. may not be as effective, Gibb added, as some may not drive past it.

“Why do you want to restrict residents from showing their support for our event,” he asked, “with no signs on residential property?”

Signs are also placed strategically in high traffic areas.

“You allow roofing, siding and renovation companies from out of town to advertise for weeks but we can’t do it once a year,” said Gibb. “I don’t understand your concerns.”

The committee works year-round on the event and Gibb also pointed out the investment the Rotary Club has made in Amherstburg including the Miracle League field. He said they are also planning on supplying carbon monoxide detectors to homes at little to no cost this spring to low income families

“We are presently contemplating another new project that the town desperately needs. An announcement could come shortly,” he added.

Meloche questioned only allowing two weeks for the Rotary Club to put out signs and believed they are restricting their cause. He believed it is not up to government to put such restrictions in place and the signs are “a cost effective way of advertising.”

Meloche even quoted Supreme Court of Canada cases in similar matters.

“As far as I’m concerned, we are, in effect, being restrictive,” said Meloche.

“I am totally opposed to this request,” said Councillor Diane Pouget, adding she did support the Rotary Club in general.

Pouget said they went through a sign bylaw updating process for two years, and said they would be going backwards if they started allowing amendments to it.

“I believe in keeping it the way it is,” said Pouget.

The Communities in Bloom judges that came to Amherstburg last year also commented on the “sign pollution” matter when they were here, she said.

Director of planning, development and legislative services Mark Galvin said it is “a very difficult area of the law” and that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is an ever evolving area of the law.

Councillor Jason Lavigne said there were two years of discussion and public consultation on the sign bylaw and then suddenly after it passed, “all these concerns are coming up.” Manager of licensing and enforcement Nicole Rubli said the bylaw passed last year dealt with off-site portable signs and the bylaw that was being enforced in the Rotary Club’s case has been on the books since 2006.

“We do help,” Councillor Rick Fryer told the Rotary members, noting money is spent to help festivals advertise. “We are trying to help festivals as much as we can.”

George-Jurilj said they “are very disappointed by council’s decision in not working with us. The fact that this law has been in place since 2006 and never enforced until 2016 goes to show it has not been a real cause for concern for many of the residents in Amherstburg.”

She added the committee spends thousands of dollars on advertising for Ribfest in Amherstburg each year.

“We pay for billboards from Windsor to Chatham, radio, TV and newspaper ads, and lawn signs that we place in all our neighbouring communities. To spend this amount of time, energy and money bringing people and venue into the town of Amherstburg is something we are happy to do. We love this town and its people,” she continued. “But when I am told I can’t put a sign on my own front lawn supporting an event and organization that has done so very much for this town, I must say its extremely frustrating to say the least.”

George-Jurilj added: “This situation coupled with a few other factors has really made us re-evaluate our event. This may be ‘a sign of the times’ for us and our future here in Amherstburg.”

 

Rotary Club says thanks to Ribfest volunteers, donates to House youth centre

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Rotary Club of Amherstburg gave thanks to those who helped during Ribfest, made a donation to a local non-profit group and also honoured one of their own.

All in one meeting.

The local Rotarians held their weekly meeting last Wednesday night at Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 but that meeting was larger than normal as over 30 people attended with many having been volunteers at July’s Ribfest that was held in Centennial Park.

Rotary Club of Amherstburg past president Lena Mangoff-Lazanja (left) presents a cheque for $950 to House Youth Centre activities co-ordinator Rebecca Vander Vaart last Wednesday. The proceeds came from can returns from Ribfest.

Rotary Club of Amherstburg past president Lena Mangoff-Lazanja (left) presents a cheque for $950 to House Youth Centre activities co-ordinator Rebecca Vander Vaart last Wednesday. The proceeds came from can returns from Ribfest.

Past president Lena Mangoff-Lazanja chaired the meeting as president Laura George-Jurilj was absent after having surgery. Mangoff-Lazanja said the event could not happen without all of the volunteers that turn out annually.

“It would not be the success that it is without all of your help,” she told the group assembled around the table.

Mangoff-Lazanja said the Ribfest is one of the largest weekend events in Amherstburg, something she is proud of. Carl Gibb, the Rotarian that heads the Ribfest committee, echoed Mangoff-Lazanja’s comments about the volunteers.

“You people are just amazing,” said Gibb. “We’d never pull it off without your help. “It is so nice to have people that are so loyal and help us out.”

Gibb said attendance was down 4,000 people “but we still made money. It’s a credit to all of you people and all of the work we did.”

The Rotary Club and its Ribfest committee thanked the volunteers that worked the event at the Rotary Club's Oct. 26 meeting. Back row (from left): Bob Pillon, Ann-Marie Favot, Cathy Thomas, Carl Gibb. Front row (from left): Tony Ross, Lena Mangoff-Lazanja, Dan Hunt and Gene Sliepenbeek. Absent are Barb Brookbanks and Rotary Club president Laura George-Jurilj.

The Rotary Club and its Ribfest committee thanked the volunteers that worked the event at the Rotary Club’s Oct. 26 meeting. Back row (from left): Bob Pillon, Ann-Marie Favot, Cathy Thomas, Carl Gibb. Front row (from left): Tony Ross, Lena Mangoff-Lazanja, Dan Hunt and Gene Sliepenbeek. Absent are Barb Brookbanks and Rotary Club president Laura George-Jurilj.

Mangoff-Lazanja read greetings from George-Jurilj, which stated: “I wish I could join you all in celebrating another successful year of Ribfest. Another year full of hard work, sacrifice, planning and dedication, not to mention time. The months, weeks and days leading up to the Ribfest and of course the weekend of the event you all gave so freely of your time – time away from friends, family and other commitments, time I know can be hard to find. I cannot begin to thank you for your time and efforts, without each one of you our event wouldn’t be the huge success it is.

“It’s amazing what can happen when people come together with a common vision and a common purpose. You have all shown the true definition of ‘Rotary at Work.’”

Gibb was also recognized, with Lazanja pointing out the work he does not only for the Ribfest but other Rotary events as well.

“There’s really no words. We really appreciate everything (Carl) does for the club,” said Mangoff-Lazanja. “Part of the reason this event has worked year after year after year is because of Carl.”

The Rotary Club presented the House youth centre with a cheque for $950 as House members helped at the Ribfest. The money came from the return of empty beer cans that were cashed in.

The club also paid tribute to Lazanja, who served as president for a total of four non-consecutive years. Gibb noted that “we’re a small club” and they appreciate Mangoff-Lazanja’s willingness to serve as president for as long as she did.

Mangoff-Lazanja was presented a metal lantern that was crafted by Hazen Price, who is also a tinsmith at the Park House Museum. The Rotary Club is a major funder of the Park House.

Rotary Club past president Lena Mangoff-Lazanja admires a new lantern she received as a gift Oct. 26. It was crafted by Park House Museum tinsmith and fellow Rotarian Hazen Price.

Rotary Club past president Lena Mangoff-Lazanja admires a new lantern she received as a gift Oct. 26. It was crafted by Park House Museum tinsmith and fellow Rotarian Hazen Price.

George-Jurilj also had a message for Mangoff-Lazanja, with that message read by Gibb: “I wouldn’t be where I am today in my Rotary life if not for Lena. One because she nominated me for president, and two because she has given me her unwavering support. She has set a great example for not only the role as president, but as a true Rotarian. Her dedication, perseverance, knowledge and passion through her terms as president are something I truly admire. She has left me with some very big shoes to fill in my time as your president. But I know with her as one of my greatest cheerleaders I will be able to serve you all very well. Thank you Lena for all your service in Rotary. You have many wonderful accomplishment you should be very proud of.”

Mangoff-Lazanja praised the work of the group as a whole, stating nothing could be accomplished without the work of everyone.

“You guys made it easy for me,” she told her fellow Rotarians.

Mangoff-Lazanja added she served as president as long as she did because of her fellow Amherstburg Rotarians and the support she received from District 6400.

“It’s a family,” she said.