Bob Rozankovic

Town council takes no action on integrity commissioner recommendations

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A pair of reports recommending sanctions against council members in two unrelated integrity commissioner investigations has seen no action taken against either council member.

Integrity commissioner Bruce Elman recommended that Councillor Jason Lavigne’s remuneration be suspended for 45 days with council not only rejecting that but also to suspend his pay for one month.

According to Elman’s report, he investigated alleged leaks that came out of a Sept. 10 in-camera meeting and believed that by “circumstantial information” that it proved to be Lavigne who committed the leak. Lavigne has vehemently denied that accusation.

Elman said two of the four council members at that meeting – councillors Leo Meloche and Rick Fryer -would have had no reason to contact Amherstburg Police Services Board (APSB) chair Bob Rozankovic with information. He said Mayor Aldo DiCarlo was “outraged” by the leak, leaving only Lavigne.

Elman also referred to two calls placed by Lavigne to clerk Paula Parker about in-camera information and the discussion thereof. He also stated that Lavigne and Rozankovic were not co-operative during the investigation and that Lavigne refused to sign a “Statement of Assurance.”

“Councillor Lavigne’s reluctance to meet to discuss the disclosure of the confidential information – the first time that this has happened to me in the eight years I have been doing integrity work – leads me to the strong inference that Councillor Lavigne was the individual who leaked the information from the in-camera council meeting to Bob Rozankovic,” Elman wrote in his report.

Elman stated in his report that he wrote to Rozankovic by e-mail a total of eight times.

“Each time I was either rebuffed or put off to some future time. Finally, on Oct. 24, he indicated that he would not speak to me on the pretense that ‘the agenda behind this investigation is lacking in legitimacy.’ I responded that “there is no ‘agenda’ behind this investigation; nor is it ‘lacking in legitimacy.’”

Elman told town council he believed the investigation could have been avoided if the information was shared from the beginning.

“Either one of them could have stood up and said this is how it happened and this is why it happened and we’re sorry,” said Elman.

Pouget pointed out that the mayor was supposed to contact an investigator to look into administration’s role but that has not come in yet. She believed it was premature and didn’t think council should be dealing with the issue Monday night.

There was also a meeting in CAO John Miceli’s office before the special Sept. 17 meeting, Pouget claimed, and that Councillor Rick Fryer was on Miceli’s computer. Fryer would put a motion forward at the Sept. 17 meeting to have Lavigne and Rozankovic removed from the APSB but it was defeated.

Fryer said he never touched Miceli’s computer and that there have been “allegations all over the place.” He said he wanted Rozankovic and Lavigne removed from the board for the investigation only, adding something could have been done that night had someone come forward with the information.

Pouget responded that people had already been “publicly lynched” and that “the only thing we didn’t do that night was tar and feather them. They were already found guilty by some.”

Lavigne said he will defend his actions and that of Rozankovic and that “I’ve done absolutely nothing wrong.” He said the APSB has been discredited for several months.

In a written statement, Lavigne stated “I would like to take the opportunity to set the record straight. At no time did I divulge any confidential material to Bob Rozankovic.” Lavigne said there was an in-camera meeting of the board in late-August where information was obtained from Windsor Chief Al Frederick. Administration provided council with a report that contained the confidential meeting from the board’s in-camera meeting at an in-camera meeting of council Sept. 10, Lavigne maintained and that he pointed that out to Rozankovic that confidential information that Rozankovic was already aware of was shared with council. Lavigne said Rozankovic then contact DiCarlo with that information.

“The integrity commissioner investigation was designed to find me at fault from the start in my opinion and after seeing how one of these reports was used against Windsor Councillor Rino Bortolin as a political tool, I decided it was not in my best interest to continue to co-operate. There is a a reason these investigations are generally not done during an election and Mr. Elman made our clerk aware of this fact. It was very apparent that there was an attempt to complete an investigation as quickly as possible and, in my opinion, it would have influenced the election and unfairly discredited Mr. Rozankovic and myself,” Lavigne wrote. “I leave this position with my head held high knowing I did not do what some have accused me of.”

Elman’s written report also stated that he believes the new council should be aware of the report for when it makes its committee appointments next term.

In a written statement to the RTT, Rozankovic stated: “By both the Town’s Code of Conduct, and more importantly the Police Service Act Code of Conduct for Police Board Members, neither Mr. Lavigne nor myself have done anything wrong and been the subjects of a ludicrous investigation that had no legitimacy. Mr. Lavigne fulfilled his obligation per Provincial Legislation (Police Service Act), legislation that supersedes any municipal policy. The Integrity Commissioner had no purview to investigate me as a Police Board Member, and he stated this. Yet he decided to pronounce judgement and as such defamed my character in a public forum. This investigation was rooted in vindictiveness on the part of certain individuals.”

Council voted 3-2 not to sanction Lavigne. The motion to suspend his pay failed with Councillor Joan Courtney, Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale and Pouget voting against and Fryer and Meloche being in favour. DiCarlo was not at the meeting due to illness and Lavigne declared conflict during the discussion in council chambers.

As the discussion went into accusations over conduct by Councillor Diane Pouget, Elman noted that he “slowed down the report” as not to have it come out during an election season. Miceli filed the complaint against Pouget over comments made at in-camera meetings both in 2017 and 2018 and comments made at a public meeting in 2018.

“It is clear from the documents filed in this Complaint that there is no love lost between Mr. Miceli and

Councillor Pouget. Councillor Pouget did not vote in favour of Mr. Miceli’s appointment and it is apparent that she still believes that he was the wrong person for the position. Mr. Miceli believes, with some justification,  that the Councillor continues to question his capabilities and his integrity and that she is trying to undermine his authority in those areas of responsibility reserved for the CAO,” Elman’s written report concluded as it relates to the second report on council’s agenda.

Elman added later in his report that “Councillor Pouget may have legitimate questions, for example about hiring of staff, but those questions should be directed to inquiring whether the Council-determined policies have been followed. It is the CAO’s job to hire staff and, if Council policies have been observed, it is not Council’s role to second guess the CAO.”

Pouget did not participate in the discussion during the meeting, but a written response from her was part of the agenda package.

“It is important to note, that Mr. Miceli did not file a complaint about the August 21, 2017 In-camera meeting until July 6, 2018, almost one year after the meeting and only a few weeks before I decided to run for Deputy Mayor,” Pouget wrote. “In Mr. Miceli’s complaint to you, Mr. Miceli provided inaccurate wording and information, that I challenged and corrected. This was verified with a copy of an audio. Further to that, I did not use bad language and I did not raise my voice. In  fact, not one member of Council including the mayor stated, that they found my words ‘insulting’ and not one member of Council commented on this exchange of words. In fact, there were no further comments about this meeting, until a complaint was issued by John Miceli almost one year later, right at election time.”

Pouget was also concerned over the timing of the investigation over her complaints of being harassed and bullied. Another issue was over a discussion over money related to Belle Vue fundraising and that occurred after a motion was passed allowing Miceli controls during the lame duck session.

“This motion was meant to protect our taxpayers, yet Mr. Miceli filed a complaint accusing me of not trusting his professional judgment. I believe it was my right to try and protect our taxpayers during this lame duck period,”  she stated in her written submission to Elman.

Fryer believed by not supporting Elman’s findings, it would send the wrong message to the new council and to the community. Councillor Leo Meloche said he witnessed the events and while “I have the utmost respect for council and staff, everyone needs to be treated with respect.”

Lavigne shot back, stating there are members of council that violate the code of conduct by what they have recently said on social media, referencing Meloche and recent comments on Facebook.

Council voted 3-2 to simply receive the report on the Pouget-related investigation with Courtney, DiPasquale and Lavigne in favour and Meloche and Fryer against.

Miceli stated after the meeting that he will defend his reputation and his staff and would file a complaint again if he felt the need. According to Miceli, he said he has had to endure having his capabilities questioned for the last four years. He said council supports one another and believed the decision not to seek sanctions was “par for the course” with the outgoing council.

 

APSB thanks officers, recognizes service at recent dinner

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Amherstburg Police Service and the Amherstburg Police Services Board (APSB) recognized officers for their service as well as the service itself last week.

A dinner was held at Riccardo’s Italian Restaurant last Tuesday night and featured current and past members of the Amherstburg Police Service and the APSB in attendance. Among the former members that came back were retired chief Roger Hollingworth, former mayor Wayne Hurst, former councillor John Sutton as well as Pauline Gemmell and Frank Cleminson.

Bob Rozankovic, the current APSB chair, said he thanked the officers for their service to the town and to “remind the officers that the community loves them.” He said the officers’ careers are rooted here and that the town will always appreciate their service.

Const. Nick Dupuis (left) receives his five-year award from Chief Tim Berthiaume. (Submitted photo)

Chief Tim Berthiaume recalled that he wanted to become a police officer when he was a youth and his aspirations came true.

“I’ve been living my dream the entire time,” said Berthiaume.

Berthiaume thanked the men and women of the Amherstburg Police Service, calling them the “backbone” of the service.

“You are the very best at what you do,” Berthiaume told them. “Don’t let anyone else tell you otherwise.”

Berthiaume said the board has been always been very supportive of him during his eight years as chief, and praised the current board as it had to endure stress and issues as part of the process which saw town council vote to switch policing to Windsor.

“This board has gone through a very difficult time,” said Berthiaume. “You got blamed for things you had nothing to do with. You persevered. You have got us through the toughest time the Amherstburg Police Service has ever experienced.”

Const. Shawn McCurdy (left) accepts his 25-year award from Chief Tim Berthiaume. (Submitted photo)

Berthiaume also praised APSB secretary Nancy Leavoy, calling her “the glue that holds us together.” He also thanked Hollingworth, with Berthiaume noting that he had tough shoes to fill after Hollingworth retired. He said the board “took a chance on me” as chief and “you allowed me to be me.”

Saying that serving the community is “God’s work,” Berthiaume added that his service could not have been done without the support of his wife Mary and their family. He continued to praise the officers by noting the police work often sees officers have to miss holidays and birthdays but praised the families for allowing them to do it.

As part of the dinner, Const. Nick Dupuis was recognized for his five years of service. Const. Shawn McCurdy was also recognized with McCurdy honoured for his 25 years of service.

 

Job offers to Amherstburg police officers delayed

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Job offers to Amherstburg police officers were delayed, but it does not appear the delay will be a long one.

Offers from the Windsor Police Service were scheduled to come out last Saturday but now appear to be coming this week instead. Const. Shawn McCurdy, president of the Amherstburg Police Association (APA), said the delay was “for a short period of time” and that was all they were told.

“We received a memo from (Windsor police) Chief Frederick outlining that,” he said.

According to McCurdy, “there was a scheduled job offer and that has been delayed at the request of Mayor DiCarlo.”

McCurdy told the RTT last Thursday that they were scheduled to receive an update yesterday.

“From the information we’re receiving, there’s a disagreement as it relates to severance and the understanding of the arbitrator’s decision,” said McCurdy. “From the association’s perspective, we’re not sure what the disagreement is. We’re quite clear on what it means. Our position is we’re entitled to severance and that has been our position.”

Members who elect not to take a position with the Windsor Police Service would receive four weeks for every year of service, he said. McCurdy added it’s a decision for each individual member to make but he expects most officers to take the offer.

“I am going to accept a position with Windsor. I am not going to accept severance,” said McCurdy. “A majority of employees will be accepting positions. It’s common sense. We can’t go without a job.”

McCurdy noted that he sat on the Joint Police Advisory Committee (JPAC) and that the possibility of severance has existed since last December. He said they are bound by the Police Services Act that all officers would have to have the same collective agreement.

“That’s what this struggle is all about,” he said.

McCurdy added they do not want to dispute anything in the media, and that the APA deals with the Amherstburg Police Services Board (APSB).

“That’s who we are going to deal with to resolve this matter,” he said.

“Windsor police has been more than accommodating and professional with us,” McCurdy continued. “This has nothing to do with their side.”

APSB chair Bob Rozankovic confirmed that “offers were delayed but are being delivered to APS this Tuesday and Thursday. The board had not been told why they were delayed. Possibly Town Administration can answer that.”

Rozankovic added that “once formal offers are received, then the process can move forward.”

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo stated last Friday that he cannot legally discuss any police issues at the current time. He added he could not confirm any issues relating to severance including whether Frederick contacted local officers.

At one of the two hotel announcements the previous week, the mayor stated that severance may only come into play if an Amherstburg officer is asked to take less to stay employed.

“The language in the collective agreement is referred to in the decision. If the town does not equalize or provide equal rank compensation salary, then the severances would kick in,” DiCarlo told the media after the second of two hotel announcements Oct. 19. “We maintain the position if we equalize everything between the two contracts, there would be no severances.”

DiCarlo also stated Oct. 19 that there will be $14-$15 million in savings over the 20-year contract and that there would be savings for the town “no matter what,” even if severances had to be paid out.

 

 

 

Town, APSB in disagreement over severance package issue

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Members of the Amherstburg Police Services Board (APSB) and the town, led by Mayor Aldo DiCarlo, are in an apparent dispute after a decision was released regarding an arbitration hearing last Thursday.

The hearing was held in Toronto before arbitrator Larry Steinberg and involved members of the APSB as well as the Amherstburg Police Association and was held last Wednesday.

The decision, released the next morning, has the town and the APSB at different ends of the spectrum. According to DiCarlo, the decision did not suggest that Amherstburg police officers could simply leave and walk away with the money. Officers could receive four weeks for every year of service in severance but DiCarlo indicated that severance may only come into play if an Amherstburg officer is asked to take less to stay employed.

“The language in the collective agreement is referred to in the decision. If the town does not equalize or provide equal rank compensation salary, then the severances would kick in,” DiCarlo told the media after the second of two hotel announcements last Friday.

DiCarlo referred to the provision that reads: “In the event that the Board receives permission to disband the Service and contracts policing out to another police service, other than the Ontario Provincial Police, or amalgamates with another police service, any member of the Association who is not offered the same or higher rank or classification level without loss or seniority and an equivalent or improved salary and benefits package, as provided in Article 34.02(a), (b) and (c), or the member may elect to accept the position offered at the lower rank or classification and lower salary, in which case the board shall pay to the member the difference in salary provided in this Agreement and the salary received in the new position, for a period of two (2) years.”

“We maintain the position if we equalize everything between the two contracts, there would be no severances,” said DiCarlo.

DiCarlo touted the position that there will be $14-$15 million in savings over the 20-year contract and that there would be savings for the town “no matter what,” even if severances had to be paid out.

The arbitrator ruled that a “line-by-line approach must be conducted separately for each salary and benefits” and “I am of the opinion that the reference to ‘benefits’ includes all benefits in the collective agreement and not simply health and welfare benefits.”

The decision adds that: “In addition to the core dispute between the parties, it should be noted that the Association agreed in the event an employee elects to accept a position with the City of Windsor with inferior salary and benefits, the two-year salary top up referred to in the collective agreement only applies to salary and not benefits. The Association specifically reserved its right, however, to argue that the meaning of salary goes beyond the annual salaries in the collective agreements.”

Councillor Jason Lavigne, who is a member of the APSB, noted that the town can have the position it wants but it’s the board that handles severances. He believed there was “a lot of negativity and misinformation directed at the board” but the board has done “everything above board and on par.”

Lavigne believed DiCarlo has taken several positions on the issue while the APSB has always maintained the position there was a chance for anywhere from $0-$2.4 million in severances.

“We hired an out-of-town, very highly regarded law firm that specializes in police negotiations,” said Lavigne.

Lavigne questioned where the money would come from to cover severances, something that Rozankovic noted would have to come in one lump sum payment.

“We’re very confused with the conflicting statements coming out of town hall,” said Lavigne.

Rozankovic stated the arbitrator’s decision shows there is a 99.9 per cent “likelihood” that the town could be exposed to up to $2.4 million in severances.

“This has been knowledge here since the Feb. 26 council meeting. They were told then that there was a chance of $0-$2.4-million worth of severances. It was only a chance then but now, it’s a very severe likelihood, but again, not certain.”

Officers will begin getting job offers Oct. 27 and will have two weeks to consider them. Rozankovic believes there are about four to six that may not accept the offers.

Lavigne said they are not dealing in “conspiracy theories or innuendos,” that they are dealing with, stressing that it is “public knowledge.”

“It’s been misrepresented to the public,” he believed. “In my opinion, that has to with politics and not much to do with good governance.”

Lavigne also questioned the recent meeting regarding an alleged in-camera leak, believing it to be “smoke and mirrors” as the issue regarding police severances is that of the board and not council to begin with.

Rozankovic, the APSB chair, said the board has dealt with matters throughout the entire process with honesty and integrity.

“I am so proud of this board and the association that has had a lot of stress this year,” he said.

Lavigne didn’t believe council listened to the people during the process of switching to Windsor police and dismissed any notion of a “silent majority.” He said most polls, comments and information he heard opposed the switch.

“Democracy doesn’t work by listening to the silent majority,” he said. “I’ve been out there. Show me the silent majority.”

Rozankovic and Lavigne, both election candidates for deputy mayor and councillor respectively, say they are simply speaking the facts.

“People can say we’re playing politics but we’re telling the truth,” said Rozankovic.

Rozankovic compared the process to being “a square peg being forced into a round hole no matter what.”

Lavigne also questioned the morale that Amherstburg officers will have, adding that the town needs to get this issue over with and move forward. Both he and Rozankovic praised the Amherstburg officers and the training they received.

“This is a life decision for our officers,” Lavigne said, of the offers from Windsor police.

Rozankovic acknowledged the recent hotel announcements and believed the news of the arbitration hearing unfortunately came at the same time as those announcements.

Deputy mayor candidates square off

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The candidates for deputy mayor went head-to-head last Thursday evening in the second of two “Meet the Candidates” nights organized by the Amherstburg Chamber of Commerce (ACOC).

Held at Western Secondary School, the event featured Rick Fryer, Diane Pouget, Leo Meloche and Bob Rozankovic making opening and closing statements with questions also being posed by moderator Patty Handysides of AM800. Many of the questions were the same as the previous night’s councillor debates and had been sent in by members of the public.

“Infrastructure is a need, not a want,” said Fryer.

Fryer added that jobs are also needed and that the mayor and chief administrative officer (CAO) are already doing “a great job” in bringing new investments to Amherstburg.

“We definitely need jobs,” he said. “Amherstburg is ready for new innovation and jobs.”

Fibre internet coming to town will assist in bringing jobs to town, Fryer believed, and that the town needs to go after employment for such lands as the former General Chemical property and other areas.

“I’m always looking after the ratepayers,” said Fryer.

Fryer said infrastructure is the top item on his to-do list and that council was saddled with a lot of infrastructure needs when they took office in Dec. 2014. He said the town has to expand its tax base.

Meloche said his late wife grew to love Amherstburg and that he found time to take care of her plus look after his other obligations when she was ill.

“I did what needed to be done,” said Meloche. “I fulfilled my commitments.”

Meloche said he brings sound financial accountability and business analysis to the table and that the current council was able to make “substantial improvements” in town.

While noting there are issues like Belle Vue, Duffy’s and the roads still left to be resolved, Meloche said the town has to “keep the momentum” and continue to make progress.

“Progress doesn’t just happen,” he said. “We need to keep working at it.”

Meloche said the problems relating to roads have been “20 years in the making” but the town now has an asset management plan and levies to help pay for projects.

“Unfortunately, what taxpayers didn’t pay 20 years ago is going to be put on their shoulders in the next four years,” he said. “There’s no way around it. We will have to continue to pay for the errors of the past.”

Pouget outlined her past experiences, dating back to the 1990’s when she headed up the Parent-Teacher Council (PTA) at General Amherst High School. She said they fought to preserve the school from being lost by the public board and they were successful in keeping it as General Amherst after some struggles. She said she was sued at the time, adding “Glenn, I know what you’re going through,” in reference to mayoral candidate Glenn Swinton’s ongoing defamation suit filed against him by CAO John Miceli.

Pouget said efforts to save the school included blocking off streets, meeting provincial officials and gaining national headlines. The lawsuit against her was eventually dropped. That led to the start of her career in municipal politics. She said they had to save General Amherst again earlier this term when it was part of a PARC process, along with Western Secondary School and other schools in the area.

Town council hired local lawyer Anthony Leardi to represent them in the matter and Pouget called the $12,000 expenditure some of the best tax dollars ever spent.

“I believe my 14 years of municipal experience will assist me in becoming your next deputy mayor,” she said.

Pertaining to roads, Pouget said they now have a roads needs study and that the town has to follow it and the advice of its engineers. She said they have to proceed carefully pertaining to roads but added they have made other successful investments including ones to combat flooding.

The debt will be $35 million by the end of the year, she said, with $15 million in reserves. Much of the debt, she added, is tied up long term.

Rozankovic said “the next council will be pivotal in determining the future of Amherstburg for many years to come. Moving forward we need to make decisions ensuring that residents get the maximum value for  their tax dollars.”

Rozankovic wondered where the $24-30 million will come from to update and replace the Amherstburg water treatment plant and said other issues include roads, plans for both Duffy’s and Belle Vue, a new outdoor swimming pool and a decision on the remaining 12 acres at Centennial Park.

The policing issue has become the focal point of this election, Rozankovic added, and that people were actually wondering four years ago whether the town was getting value for the money they spend on policing.

“Whether to contract out policing or not is not simply an exercise in ‘what is cheaper.’ There is the emotional attachment of residents to consider,” he said.

Rozankovic said a referendum could have been on the ballot and would have pushed the contract start date to July 2019.

“So where do we stand today on the policing issue?” he asked. “The residents were told that every employee of the Amherstburg Police Service Board would be offered employment with the Windsor Police Service. That was not the case. The residents were told that there would be no severance payouts attributed to the contracting out of police services. While we do not have solid numbers yet, we can say that the total possible exposure exceeds $2.5 million.”

Rozankovic said he will, if elected, ask the new council “to hit the pause button” and re-evaluate the situation.

The $1.41 million committed annually for roads will likely lead to the town falling further behind, said Rozankovic, and that “we have to find money somewhere in the system.” He suggested maybe it wasn’t such a good move to buy the Duffy’s property and Belle Vue.

Leo Meloche, Rick Fryer, Diane Pouget and Bob Rozankovic discuss issues during the Meet the Candidates Night presented by the Amherstburg Chamber of Commerce Oct. 4 at Western Secondary School.

On the subject of economic development, Meloche believed small business is the key for economic development. That will be aided by further residential development with the new force main to lead to over 700 new homes coming to town.

Commercial development will spur job growth, Meloche added, and the town has to look at helping small businesses and “build from the ground up.”

The town “sells itself,” Pouget believed, and that the local real estate industry does a good job in promoting the town. The tourism department also does a great job, she said, and touted the General Chemical site for future development.

Pouget also noted the need for a hotel in Amherstburg.

“We have so much to offer,” she said.

Rozankovic said he travels through China, Mexico and the southeastern United States through his employment and questioned the ability to attract industry to town.

“Everyone is chasing industry,” he said. “Amherstburg doesn’t have anything to sell to industry. This is a reality.”

Rozankovic suggested promoting commercial and residential growth, including more distilleries and microbreweries. He said there is a reason there are not takers for the former General Chemical site and that the future is residential and commercial development.

Fryer said he would want to set up a “task force” for economic development and touted the area’s workforce. There should be incentives offered to companies, Fryer suggested, and that such a proposal is happening in Windsor.

The town has “turned the corner,” said Fryer, but now a “revival” is needed. He suggested streamlining the application and permit processes.

“We need to go after jobs,” he said, adding he voted in favour of the Wendy’s proposal.

One of the questions was about policing. Pouget said she could not answer because of a conflict of interest. Going against the advice of her lawyer would be “very, very serious” and potentially end up in a court of law.

“I can’t put the residents of Amherstburg at risk or my family at risk,” she stated.

Rozankovic said should the deal be finalized, Windsor would do “a fine job” but believes a referendum should have been held. He reiterated that more information should be obtained before any deal is finalized.

Fryer said it has been referred to in the media as a “takeover” but it is not. He said the same officers will patrol the streets of Amherstburg and that the only thing to change will be the uniforms.

“Our officers are still going to be there,” said Fryer. “That’s not going to change.”

Rick Fryer, Leo Meloche, Bob Rozankovic and Diane Pouget took turns presenting their cases and answering questions last Thursday night at a “Meet the Candidates” event at Western Secondary School. The four are running for deputy mayor.

Meloche described himself as a “numbers guy” and that at the end of the day, he believed switching to the Windsor Police Service would result in “significant savings.” In 2014, he said, policing costs were the number two issue he heard and that he compared services to Essex and Amherstburg currently pays $1.9 million more. Municipal policing is also a hot topic at conferences, he added.

“The only thing that’s going to change is the boss,” said Meloche “The employees will still stay the same.”

Relating to taxes and funding local government, Rozankovic said there are costing pressures for such things as roads so needs have to be focused on. He stated that police severance payouts could eat up the first five years of savings “so be careful there.”

Fryer quoted a figure of $2 million to purchase Belle Vue and said he was “totally against it.”

“That’s a (heck) of a lot of roads we could have done,” he said.

Meloche said growth will take some pressures off of tax bills but stated the Libro Centre is built to the size of a 40,000 person town while the wastewater treatment plant is built to accommodate 50,000 people.

“21,000 are paying for it,” he said. “How we address it is growth.”

Pouget called for the reinstatement of the finance committee. She said that committee warned against hiring nine new staff members at the beginning of the term and that she is opposed to positions as plumbers and electricians as the town contracted those services out to “excellent people.”

In closing arguments, Rozankovic stated public trust needs to be regained and that people need to know all the facts before moving forward on projects. Pouget said she has served in every committee imaginable and that she will “continuously work” if elected deputy mayor. Meloche said both the senior and youth populations have to be consulted going forward while Fryer indicated his black and white campaign signs are keys to his campaign as “the answers I give you are in black and white.”