Bart DiPasquale

Hall of Fame coach honoured by town council

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A local high school coach as picked up another honour.

Dom Silvaggio, a recent inductee into the Windsor-Essex County Sports Hall of Fame, was honoured for that accomplishment by the Town of Amherstburg. Silvaggio was joined by several members of his family as town council paid tribute to him at the Nov. 26 council meeting.

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo was not at the meeting due to illness, but clerk Paula Parker read a statement from him that praised Silvaggio for his many accomplishments over the years.

Dom Silvaggio (third from left) was honoured by Amherstburg town council Nov. 26 on the occasion of his getting inducted into the Windsor-Essex Sports Hall of Fame. He was surrounded by members of the 2018 General Amherst Lady Gens senior girls basketball team. Making the presentation was then-Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale (right).

Among the accomplishments on Silvaggio’s resume include 26 WECSSAA/ECSSAA championships between boys and girls basketball teams. He has coached 13 SWOSSAA championship teams and the senior girls program he has overseen won ten consecutive medals at OFSAA at either the “AA” or “AAA” level, including five gold medals, three silver medals and two bronze medals at the provincial championship tournament.

“Thank you for being a great ambassador,” Paula read on DiCarlo’s behalf.

Members of the 2018 General Amherst Lady Gens came into the council chambers as a show of support for their coach. Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale presented the General Amherst High School coach with a framed certificate on behalf of the town.

Silvaggio said it felt really special to be recognized by the town.

“This is my hometown,” he said.

Silvaggio said he was humbled by the honour and that the ceremony where he was inducted was “a great night.”

Outgoing town council members say their goodbyes

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A combined 38 years of experience left town council at the Nov. 26 meeting.

The five outgoing town council members bid farewell at the final meeting of the term. Councillor Diane Pouget said her goodbyes after a combined 14 years of service, as she served from 1991-97 and again from 2010-18. Pouget thanked her fellow councillors, including four that “have been my saviours in the past year. You have done a very good job. It’s going to be hard to say goodbye to you.”

Pouget also offered her thanks to administration. She said she fielded the most complaints out of all of council and that she would bring those complaints to administration.

“You were always there for me,” said Pouget. “I thank you for that.”

Thanks were also shared with the Amherstburg Police Service, Chief Tim Berthiaume and the Amherstburg Police Services Board. Pouget thanked Berthiaume for his years of service and hoped the transition to the Windsor Police Service would be a smooth one.

Pouget also thanked the public for allowing her to be one of their council members for the last 14 years.

Councillor Leo Meloche, who has now ascended to the deputy mayor’s job, praised Pouget.

“I know she is very passionate about what she does,” said Meloche. “I really respect her for that. She’s a fighter for the people. I wish her the best in whatever she chooses to do.”

Courtney leaves after four years of service as a town councillor. The former Catholic school board trustee thanked Pouget for “everything she has done the last four years. I admire her more than she’ll ever know.”

Courtney also thanked the rest of her colleagues, stating “it’s been a real ride.” She paid tribute to councillors Rick Fryer, Jason Lavigne and Meloche. Of retiring Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale, she stated “I just love you Bart. I wish you well in your retirement.” She also thanked the citizens, including the crowd that regularly attends council meetings.

“You keep tabs on us,” she said.

Thanks were also given to Mayor Aldo DiCarlo, treasurer Justin Rousseau and the rest of administration. She referred to clerk Paula Parker and deputy clerk Tammy Fowkes as “my saviours” for all the help they have given her over the last four years.

“It’s been a ride,” said Lavigne.

Lavigne said “I can’t give enough praise to Councillor Pouget,” recalling her days of helping to save General Amherst High School to the present.

“To those lobbing insults, none of you have given what she’s given to the town,” said Lavigne.

Lavigne said he was mentored by Pouget. He added that Fryer helped get him into politics and also thanked Courtney for her support. He also wanted the community to support Meloche as he moved into the deputy mayor role. He also thanked DiPasquale and pointed out his longevity in public service.

Recommending that people “don’t listen to the noise on social media,” Lavigne said he wants the town to move forward.

“I go out of here with my head held high,” he stated.

Fryer also praised his fellow council members. He said Courtney brought her knowledge of the school board to town council and that knowledge “got us through a difficult time.” He added that Lavigne is passionate about what he does and told him he “did an admirable job the last four years.”

Five members of town council said farewell at the Nov. 26 meeting. From left: Councillor Rick Fryer, Councillor Diane Pouget, Councillor Joan Courtney, Councillor Jason Lavigne, Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale.

Like Courtney before him, Fryer referred to Meloche as “a numbers guy” and wished him continued good luck over the next four years. However, Fryer also said he would like to see more county dollars flow through Amherstburg and said, “County Road 20 looks like (crap) right now.”

Fryer said Pouget was “like a mom to me” and also pointed out her passion on town issues. He noted Pouget’s passion didn’t waver despite tough family circumstances this past term. He also praised his father Mike, who was also his campaign manager in every election he ran in.

Even though he was defeated in his bid for deputy mayor Oct. 22, Fryer said he was happy because he got an opportunity to represent the residents. He said he was always thinking of the people when he voted. He said that difficult emotional times after his ankle injury, coupled with criticism from members of the public, caused him to contemplate whether he should “get rid of myself” but “the people of Amherstburg kept me up.” He ran for council again, he said, to show “you can rise above that and be a leader in the community.”

Fryer also said that administration did a great job and “we’ve got to keep moving forward.” He believed social media should be used for such things as congratulatory messages but encouraged the community to not to use it as much.

“Get behind the next council and stay the hell off of social media,” said Fryer.

DiCarlo missed the Nov. 26 meeting due to illness. He did send written remarks, that were read by Parker.

“Over the past four years, this council has authorized and implemented many guiding documents that future councils will rely upon – all with a view to improving the quality of life for residents of Amherstburg,” DiCarlo wrote. “The Community Based Strategic Plan, with its extensive public consultation, will help to shape the future of Amherstburg. But the outgoing council did much more than simply authorize the preparation of these documents – they also acted upon them.”

DiCarlo stated that “strategic initiatives” such as the purchases of the former Duffy’s property and the Belle Vue site and the Bell Fibre to the Home initiative were all supported by the town’s Community Based Strategic Plan.

“A progressive council looks beyond four years,” DiCarlo wrote. “That’s what this council has done.”

Of DiPasquale, DiCarlo pointed out DiPasquale’s years of service with the Amherstburg Police Service as well as his eight years as a member of council – the first four as a councillor and the latter four as deputy mayor.

“It was a pleasure to serve with him as a representative on county council,” stated DiCarlo. “We thank him for his service.”

Regarding Pouget, DiCarlo noted her 14 years of public service to the residents of Amherstburg.

“She is a passionate councillor and her work with the parks committee is something that I think the residents will remember for years to come,” said DiCarlo.

DiCarlo stated that Fryer “has been a continuous advocate for infrastructure as well as environmental issues. The past two years, he has also served as chair of the Essex Region Conservation Authority.”

Of Lavigne, DiCarlo noted that they both served together on the Amherstburg Police Services Board as well as council.

“He has served with passion and commitment,” said DiCarlo of Lavigne.

DiCarlo also thanked Courtney for her service on the 2014-18 council.

“Councillor Courtney brought her experience as a school board representative to the council chamber and served with honour and passion,” he stated in his written remarks.

 

Outgoing county council members say goodbye, returning members offer thanks

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The 2014-18 term of Essex County council is wrapping up with the final meeting of the term now having been held.

The five outgoing members said farewell while other members that are returning also offered thanks to administration, fellow county council members and Warden Tom Bain. It was also the last meeting as warden for Bain, although he is returning to Essex County council for the 2018-22 term due to him still being mayor of Lakeshore.

Saying goodbye were Amherstburg Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale, Leamington Mayor John Paterson, LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya, Essex Mayor Ron McDermott and Lakeshore Deputy Mayor Al Fazio. DiPasquale, Antaya and McDermott are retiring from politics while Paterson and Fazio were not successful in their re-election bids.

“It’s been a great pleasure for me to be here these last four years,” said DiPasquale. “I learned a lot of things I didn’t know. It’s been a great ride for me.”

DiPasquale thanked county council and administration, stating “I think we’ve done a pretty good job working together.”

Paterson recalled his early days on county council when he was told to take his Leamington hat off and wear a county hat instead. He noted he brought up questions that may have gone against the status quo but did so to for the benefit of the county, adding he never felt a “negative vibe” from anyone for doing so.

There were “battles” at points, Paterson added, but “when we were done, we were done.” He also recalled the times when the county was unified, including when meeting with ministers from upper levels of government on issues.

Antaya, the current deputy warden, thanked his own residents for electing him to begin with.

“It was a thrill serving the community I grew up in. It was the crowning moment of my career,” said Antaya.

Antaya thanked the administration at the county level, noting the transition between CAO’s was “seamless” after Brian Gregg retired and Rob Maisonville took over.  He called Bain a “terrific leader” and told him “you represented the county well.”

“I enjoyed working with every one of you,” Antaya told his fellow county council members.

McDermott got choked up at points during his farewell address, thanking his community for his 15 years of service. He also thanked his deputy mayor Richard Meloche, who McDermott said has been there the entire 15 years with him. Meloche will be returning to county council next term.

“The staff is unbelievable,” McDermott said of the county’s administration, and also expressed thanks to his colleagues and Bain.

Fazio thanked Bain for being his “mentor” in both Lakeshore and at the county level. He also expressed gratitude to administration, his family, his fellow county councillors and the residents. He also thanked members of the committees he has sat on.

“It’s been a great eight years on county council,” said Fazio.

The returning members to Essex County council include both Kingsville and Tecumseh mayors and deputy mayors with Nelson Santos and Gord Queen representing the former and Gary McNamara and Joe Bachetti representing the latter.

Amherstburg Mayor Aldo DiCarlo will be returning as well. Hilda MacDonald and Marc Bondy will also be returning, but will be moving up from deputy mayor to mayor in Leamington and LaSalle respectively.

DiCarlo also expressed thanks to his colleagues for their hospitality when he first arrived four years ago. With the town going through severe financial challenges, DiCarlo recalled being given advice by many other members of county council.

“The support was truly overwhelming,” said DiCarlo.

DiCarlo also noted he was welcomed right from the start, despite not having much political experience when he was first elected. He wished outgoing members well and said he looks forward to working with the incoming county council to “continue to work together to make Essex County the best place to be.”

MacDonald noted she was the only female member of county council these last four years but said she was treated equally and with respect during the term. She thanked Bain for making her feel welcome and comfortable.

“You treated me well,” said MacDonald, who will be one of three women on the next Essex County council.

Enbridge steps up with annual donation towards River Lights

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Enbridge will once again be the presenting sponsor of the River Lights Winter Festival.

An official cheque presentation was held outside the Gordon House where the renewable energy company presented a cheque for $15,000.

“This will be Enbridge’s fifth year sponsoring the exceptional programs and some of the light

displays at the River Lights Winter Festival,” says Suzanne Shea, communications and

stakeholder relations senior advisor of power operations with Enbridge. “We are proud to have the opportunity to continue to partner with the town and share in the holiday spirit with the Amherstburg community.”

Shea told the River Town Times last Tuesday that they continue to sponsor River Lights “to celebrate the holiday season with the community and strengthen our partnership with the town.”

According to a press release, Enbridge supplies renewable power to nearly 2,400 homes in the region, thanks to its 15-megawatt Amherstburg solar facility.

Suzanne Shea, communications and stakeholder relations senior advisor of power operations with Enbridge, presents a cheque for $15,000 to Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale. Enbridge is once again sponsoring the River Lights
Winter Festival with the municipal tree lighting ceremony being Nov. 17.

“With Enbridge’s generous support, we are proud to continue the unique festival programming

our town has come to know and love. Old world charm in our vibrant community, with our

dazzling light displays, is the signature backdrop for historic Amherstburg during this event,” Mayor Aldo Di Carlo said in the press release.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale said he appreciated the generosity and the fact companies like Enbridge step up and sponsor events like River Lights.

“I think it’s wonderful,” said DiPasquale.

The six -week long festival kicks off with the municipal tree lighting ceremony Nov. 17. Sarah Van Grinsven, the town’s special events co-ordinator, said the proceeds from the Enbridge sponsorship go towards making River Lights bigger and brighter. The money, Van Grinsven noted, will help offset some of the costs of opening night.

The Town of Amherstburg made the River Lights Winter Festival an official town event earlier this year.

Van Grinsven said roughly 6-8,000 people attend the opening ceremonies for the River Lights Winter Festival with about 30,000 coming to the event overall.

“We’ve become a family tradition,” said Van Grinsven.

 

Legion Week parade helps kick off festivities

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Legion Week is underway in Amherstburg with the local branch kicking it off last Saturday with parades and awards.

Legion Week, the origins of which date back to 1953 when an open house was held in Dresden, is traditionally celebrated the third week of September. Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 held its parade and gathered back at the branch afterward. Capt. Jeff Turner, commanding officer of the #202 Fort Malden Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, acted as master of ceremonies and read proclamations from Ontario Command and other dignitaries, including Premier Doug Ford.

Ford’s statement included comments about it being a good opportunity for members of the community to come out and discover more about their local Legion branch.

Zone Commander Gayle Brown congratulated Legion Br. 157 for its parade and hoped the community would go to the Legion to find out what it’s all about.

The Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 colour guard leads the Sept. 15 parade down Dalhousie St. (above) and Sandwich St. S. (below).

“I invite everyone to come in and see what the Royal Canadian Legion does and why we are part of this organization,” she said.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale brought greetings from the town, as Mayor Aldo DiCarlo was in Ohio with local Miracle League players at the Miracle League all-star game. DiPasquale stated the Legion is a very worthy organization.

“This building and the people who work inside of it make it go,” said DiPasquale. “It’s a great place.”

The parade returned to Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 upon its conclusion.

Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 president Laurie Cavanaugh thanked those who helped put Legion Week together.

“A lot of work goes into this week,” she said. “It takes a lot of people, a lot of volunteers.”

Cavanaugh said the Legion is hopeful of having people come in and see what it offers.

“This week, if we get one or two members or if we get one or two people come out that have never been here before, it’s an accomplishment,” said Cavanaugh.

Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157 also recognized members with Years of Service Awards.

Awards for affiliate members included Mark Denunzio (10 years) and Michael J. Duby (20 years).

Associate member ten-year awards included James Cyrowski, Martina Heeren, Christina Hindi, Diane C. Langlois, Judith Loomis, Murray Loomis, Amber Turner and Constance Sinasac. Cavanaugh and Jocelyn Hagerty received 15-year awards while 20-year award went to Gary Cooper, Ed J. Delisle, Dawn M. Fryer, Dennis Pajot and Karrie Thrasher. Receiving 25-year awards were John D. Bradt, John Richard Crozier, Mark Fox, Ulyses Wayne McKinnon, Clark Moore and Michael Prue.

Associate 30-year awards went to Carol Ann Goodbout and B.B. Sprague Jr. while J. F. Fox, I.J. Goulin and Cameron Jones were recognized for 35 years of membership. Receiving awards for 40-years were Kathryn Lancop and G.G. Murray Jr. while J.P. Mertens received a 45-year award.

Capt. Richard Girard received an award for his 55 years of service to Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157.

Years of Service Awards for ordinary members went to Allan Carroll and Shawn Cooper (10 years), Laura Gazdig, Terry Hall and Russell Revington (15 years), Tracy Cooper (25 years), William St. John (30 years), John Copland (35 years), Wayne Surtees (45 years), Wayne Hurst (50 years) and Richard Girard (55 years).

Activities and events the remainder of Legion Week include a veteran appreciation dinner Wednesday night at 7 p.m. where veterans eat free, a general membership meeting Thursday at 7 p.m., a Ladies Auxiliary dinner 4-6:30 p.m. Friday, a chicken wing special Saturday from 4-6 p.m. and a Sunday breakfast from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. where veterans eat free. There will also be music and other events during the week as well.

To view more photos from the Sept. 15 Legion Week parade in Amherstburg, visit our Facebook album.