AMHA

Midget Major Stars trend in the right direction in November

It was a rough start to the month dropping our first game 4-0 to Belle River, but we would come back the following night with a convincing win (5-1 over Erie) in Game #1 of our Hosted Brandy Peddie Memorial Tournament

We went on to win Game #2 6-1 over Innisfil, but lost Game #3 4-1 to London, who would go on to win the tournament.  The positive takeaway, was a hard fought battle in the semi-finals against the defending OMHA / OHF champions Bradford Bulldogs, where we lost 3-1 while running into a hot goaltender.

The remainder of the month was successful overall, despite a tough Bluewater schedule.  With the exception of two losses to the top two Bluewater teams (Windsor 5-3 / Kent 5-1), we won 4 games outscoring our opponents 23-7, including a lopsided 6-1 win over a strong Belle River squad, who currently sits in 3rd place.

December is shaping up to be a busy month with back to back tournaments to start, and we hope we can carry the momentum as we approach playdowns.

Please come out and support your local Midget Major Stars!

 

—Courtesy of Dustin Soulliere

Town to consider its own surcharge recommendation for Libro Centre

 

By Ron Giofu

Town council has opted to consider its own recommendation for a new surcharge to be assessed to Libro Centre users.

In the process, they spurned a different proposal submitted by the building’s three main user groups – the Amherstburg Minor Hockey Association (AMHA), Skate Amherstburg and the Integrity Amherstburg Admirals.

According to a report from manager of recreation services Rick Daly, “administration proposed a capital surcharge outlined in the user fee bylaw” and “this capital surcharge is set at $6 per rental unit of time for sport facilities and park bookings and $3 per rental unit of time for room rentals.”

That option would see an estimated $25,350 collected in a year, as opposed to the other option, presented Monday night by AMHA president Marc Renaud. That option is estimated at collecting $26,648.

“We believe non-residents should pay more and adult users should pay more,” Renaud told town council. “Kids in sport stay out of court.”

Renaud said the option created by the three major users would require all three principal users to contract ice hours at a minimum100 hours per year. The principal rate user surcharge would have been $4 per hour to all hours rented on all ice surfaces from Sept. 1-April 30 annually and $10 per hour for all pads from May 1-Aug. 31.

For Amherstburg resident users that book ice rentals for a minimum of 12 hours per month would be set at $6 per hour for all pads. Casual non-resident users would pay a surcharge of $13 per hour of ice rentals.

Under the town’s proposal, Renaud said it would translate into a $21.82 cost per AMHA player and $13.50 for every Skate Amherstburg participant. Under the proposal he presented, Renaud said the numbers drop to $14.54 per player in AMHA and $9 per Skate Amherstburg participant.

According to the administrative report: “Administration recommends that Option #1 (the town’s recommendation) be approved as it is the most equitable and easiest to implement. The users would pay into the reserve equally based on rental levels.” The report added that “the fundamental difference in the structure of the reserve in Option 2 (presented by the primary users) is problematic, in that it doesn’t allow the town to deal with global building issues and only ice specific issues. Secondly, it creates inequality, as it doesn’t allow the users who are paying a disproportionate share much representation at the time the replacement is needed. In this case, you would have non-primary users subsidizing the future replacement of infrastructure to the benefit of the primary users.”

Councillor Rick Fryer said he supported the town’s recommendation, believing the $6 surcharge across the board is “fair” and that the people who use the Libro Centre most would pay a greater share of the surcharge.

“I don’t see this being a big issue with the user groups,” said Fryer.

Renaud reiterated his position that adult users should be paying more in order to keep youth in sports.

Councillor Jason Lavigne said he has three children who have played travel hockey and regardless of whether it is children or adults playing, the adults still pay the costs.

“You are kind of wishy-washy here,” Lavigne told Renaud.

Lavigne said the Libro Centre is the envy of the area but there are costs to keep it that way.

“We have to realize it costs money and we’re having issues here,” said Lavigne.

Councillor Leo Meloche believed the user groups’ options were “a burden to the non-primary users” and that the general taxpayers were paying “a pretty good share already” to maintain the Libro Centre. He said he didn’t find the user groups’ option to be unreasonable. Councillor Diane Pouget said “we try to be fair to everybody” and noted Daly’s report where it said the primary users had 54 per cent of the ice time in 2016 but would only pay 38 per cent of the total surcharge under their proposal.

Councillor Joan Courtney noted she has children and grandchildren who play hockey and believed that if a person can play hockey, they can afford to pay a little more. She noted there is money for hats and jackets and that “somehow they find the money” and didn’t believe the surcharge was unreasonable.

“To keep the Libro Centre a great facility, I don’t think it’s too much,” said Courtney.

Midget Majors host Elite 8 Brandy Peddie Memorial Tournament

 

 

The Amherstburg Stars midget major team was busy on the weekend, as the hockey team hosted the annual Elite 8 Brandy Peddie Memorial Tournament.

In addition to the Amherstburg Stars, the tournament featured some stiff competition from around this area and from around the province. Other teams included the defending OHF champion Bradford Bulldogs, the Erie North Shore Storm, the Essex Ravens, the Grimsby Peach Kings, the Innisfil Winterhawks, the London Jr. Mustangs and the St. Thomas Stars.

All games were played at the Libro Centre.

Amherstburg’s Ayden Drago (left) gets a third period scoring chance last Saturday morning against the Innisfil Winterhawks.

Amherstburg got off to a fast start Friday afternoon as they hosted the Erie North Shore Storm. The Stars beat Erie North Shore 5-1.

The scoring continued Saturday morning for the local Stars, as they defeated the Innisfil Winterhawks 6-1. The Stars played well in this contest with Dean DeLuca picking up a hat trick in the game. Amherstburg led 2-0 after one period on goals by Colton Taylor and Max Clifford and built a 5-0 lead after two periods with DeLuca scoring all three second period goals. Isaac Hammond scored in the third with Innisfil breaking the shutout in the final seconds for its goal.

The Stars lost their final game of the round-robin 4-1 Saturday night to London but advanced to the tournament semi-finals Sunday morning against Bradford. Unfortunately for Amherstburg, it was Bradford who picked up the 3-1 win to advance to the finals.

London defeated Bradford 6-3 in the finals.

University of Windsor coach tries to help other hockey coaches

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Amherstburg Minor Hockey Association (AMHA) offered a chance for some of their coaches to get some coaching tips thanks to the University of Windsor’s head coach.

Lancer coach Kevin Hamlin spoke to a group of about 25 travel coaches from AMHA at the Libro Centre and tried to impart some of the wisdom he has accumulated from his days as a university and pro player as well as from his coaching career. Hamlin’s coaching stops have included the Windsor Spitfires, Cornell University, Belle River Canadiens, Leamington Flyers, Sarnia Bees and St. Clair College as well as the Lancers.

“His credentials speak for themselves,” said AMHA travel vice president Greg Crain. “You are not going to get a better leader with more knowledge.”

Hamlin said coming out and talking with other coaches was something he enjoyed.

University of Windsor men’s hockey coach Kevin Hamlin addresses AMHA coaches during a recent talk at the Libro Centre.

“There are few places I’d rather be than be in a room with a bunch of coaches,” said Hamlin.

Hamlin encouraged the AMHA travel coaches to find something in his presentation they liked “and make it your own.

“You’re a role model,” he told the coaches. “Our athletes are watching us. We’re role models.”

Hamlin outlined his own background, recalling the day when his father enrolled him in hockey to when friend Brad Smith got him into coaching with the Spitfires. He told the coaches there are “four seasons of coaching” and the first one is the end of the season.

At the end of the season, coaches have to evaluate and critically analyze their program. Hamlin acknowledged that it isn’t easy, but “you have to. It’s about the kids we serve.”

Hamlin said that process not only helps make players better, but it actually helped him as a coach.

“It made me a better coach,” he said. “I used to hate it.”

The off-season was the second “season” of coaching, with team building being a part of that.

“The more you know each other, the more you’ll fight for each other,” said Hamlin.

Hamlin added that seasons is also when he recruits players, noting he recruits character first. He also encouraged coaches to find assistant coaches that can help with areas the head coaches may not be strong at so that they complement each other better.

The pre-season is the next stage and then it is the in-season portion of the coaches’ life. Hamlin said he spends about 15 minutes planning a practice, saying it is very important to plan for a good practice. He went over various hockey skills with the coaches and advised them on what drills can be used with players.

“Repetition is absolutely essential,” said Hamlin. “Make sure they got it before you move on.”

University of Windsor men’s hockey coach Kevin Hamlin (left) spoke with a group of AMHA travel coaches recently. AMHA vice president of travel Greg Crain (right) presents Hamlin with a plaque to thank him for his visit.

As for developing goalies, Hamlin encouraged coaches to not try and mold goalies into something they aren’t and said they can defer to a goalie coach for development at that position.

Most of all, Hamlin said he wants players and coaches to have fun.

Hamlin said he was asked to come by AMHA and said he enjoys speaking with coaches at the grassroots level. He indicated he would be willing to return if a request is made.

“This is the very least I can do,” he said. “They are doing tremendous work. They are making differences in the lives of young people. At the end of the day, that’s what we’re here to do.”

Amherstburg one of 40 communities in Goalie Assist Program for 2017-18 season

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

The Ontario Minor Hockey Association came out with a new program, geared towards giving children between the ages of 5 and 7 a chance to try out a position of goalie.

The program provides a new set of CCM goalie equipment to 40 communities, who will then loan the equipment to their prospective goalies. The associations will retain the equipment at the conclusion of the hockey season so it can be reused the following year. The idea is to continue to introduce new goalies to the position each year.

“We usually get two or three players wanting to be a goalies by novice age,” explained Amherstburg Minor Hockey Association president Marc Renaud. “To support them AMHA supplies goalie equipment to the younger age group, tyke to pee wee for their use each season. With AMHA being awarded a new set of goalie equipment it shows the goalies their position is important to AMHA. Also that we keep our equipment in top condition for their use, will help in off setting a replacement cost for new set we would have to pay. Over all reducing costs reduce registration fees.”

Renaud explained the cost of the equipment for younger goalies is in the area of $700 to $800, and gets more expensive as the child gets older.

There were more than 170 applications received from all across the OMHA for this program, which Renaud refers to as “a great program to assist goalies with equipment.”

“We’re proud to give back and re-invest in our associations through a program like Goalie Assist,” said OMHA Executive Director Ian Taylor. “Hockey is a late-specialization sport and the Goalie Assist program is a great way to introduce the position to players who may not have otherwise had the opportunity. The equipment gives every player a chance to try being a goaltender without making the financial commitment.”