Money and awareness raised for epilepsy at Amherstburg Public School

 

Mayor Wayne Hurst helps kick off “Purple Day” in recognition of epilepsy awareness while at Amherstburg Public School. He was invited by Deanna Sinasac (far left), whose daughter Alexis has epilepsy. Mackenzie and Alexis Sinasac are in the middle of the photo while Nikki Porter of the Epilepsy Support Centre is at right.

Mayor Wayne Hurst helps kick off “Purple Day” in recognition of epilepsy awareness while at Amherstburg Public School. He was invited by Deanna Sinasac (far left), whose daughter Alexis has epilepsy. Mackenzie and Alexis Sinasac are in the middle of the photo while Nikki Porter of the Epilepsy Support Centre is at right.

By Ron Giofu

 

While Amherstburg Public School raised roughly $328 for epilepsy research recently, the mother of a student with epilepsy is also happy that the event raised awareness as well.

Deanna Sinasac, whose daughter Alexis has epilepsy, noted both of her daughters help her spread the word about epilepsy.

“My wish is that with my children (Alexis and Mackenzie) trying to spread awareness, someday epilepsy will be more understood and others will want to help educate the unknown and help spread the awareness with us,” said Sinasac.

The $328.20 was raised through a “Purple Privilege Day” in which students were invited to wear a hat, have “crazy” hair or mismatched socks in exchange for a toonie or loonie. The proceeds benefit epilepsy research. Sinasac invited Mayor Wayne Hurst, the latter cutting a purple ribbon to mark the occasion. Town council passed a motion declaring the day “Purple Day” in Amherstburg.

Purple Day is dedicated to increasing awareness about epilepsy worldwide. Roughly 65 million people around the world live with epilepsy with 300,000 of them being Canadian.

“Alexis started with seizures unexpectedly when she was two-years-old,” said Sinasac. “I want everyone to know what epilepsy is. We need to spread the word.”

Sinasac said the public should know that epilepsy is “very common” and that up to 50,000 people die each year from seizures and related causes with the mortality rate being two to three times higher than the general population.

“Epilepsy is a very serious medical condition and we need the public to jump on board and not forget why we celebrate Purple Day,” said Sinasac. “We need to support the people who fight this every day and let them know they should not, and will not, stand alone in this fight.”

Nikki Porter, communications liaison with the Windsor-Essex chapter of the Epilepsy Support Centre, said the Sinasac family has been “awesome” in raising money and awareness of the disease. She said she often presents to schools and groups telling people what to do if they see someone having a seizure.

“There’s a lot of stigma around epilepsy,” said Porter. “A lot of that is due to a lack of knowledge.”

For more information, visit www.epilepsysupport.ca.

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