Local WWII veteran receives Canada 150 medal and Quilt of Valour

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A local World War II veteran has been honoured with a Canada 150 medal as well as a Quilt of Valour.

The presentation was made last Tuesday to Private Kenneth Gordon Farrow, who is now 97-years-old and a resident at Richmond Terrace Long-Term Care Facility. The quilt was made by Jan Bergeron and the medal was presented by Capt. Richard Girard CD Ret., the branch service officer with Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157, and Don Nantais, the Zone A-2 branch service officer and second vice president of Legion Br. 157.

Farrow served in World War II for the duration of the conflict, enlisting in his hometown of Haileybury, Ontario with stops in Quebec and Halifax before eventually being sent to Europe.

“I signed up the second day of the war,” Farrow recalled.

World War II veteran Kenneith Farrow (centre) received a Canada 150 medal and a Quilt of Valour last week. Richmond Terrace unit manager Ryan Kehoe (far left) and director of care Matthew Summerfield (far right) hold the quilt while Don Nantais and Capt. Richard Girard present the medal.

World War II veteran Kenneith Farrow (centre) received a Canada 150 medal and a Quilt of Valour last week. Richmond Terrace unit manager Ryan Kehoe (far left) and director of care Matthew Summerfield (far right) hold the quilt while Don Nantais and Capt. Richard Girard present the medal.

Upon arriving in Great Britain, Farrow said they were greeted by the mayor of Glasgow, who took the soldiers to dinner at city hall. His tour of duty lasted right through until 1945 and he returned home after World War II had ended.

“They went one way and I went the other because I had the points to get home,” he said. He returned home with his war bride Catherine and they had two children Gordon and Sheila.

In the meantime, he served in nearly every European country and earned many Canadian medals, roughly ten in total.

Farrow was also injured in Belgium thanks to the result of a bazooka blast.

After being a guard at the Kingston penitentiary, Farrow came to southwestern Ontario and served with the Windsor Police Service for 30 years. He retired as an inspector.

“I was 30 years on the police department,” he said. “I stayed on the police force until I retired.”

Farrow joked “they kicked me out” but he had reached the mandatory retirement age of 60. He was also president of the International Police Association for 27 years.

The medal and quilt presentations were something he didn’t see coming.
“They surprised me tremendously,” said Farrow. “It was a great surprise.”

 

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