Fundraiser helps with new cabins at local campground

 

By Jonathan Martin

Local businesses have come together to replace two ramshackle cabins at a camp for underprivileged children.

The cabins had been standing since just after World War Two, according to Dan Inverarity, a local realtor who has been working with Kiwanis Sunshine Point Camp camp for years. He said the decades-old cabins lacked foundations, locks for the doors and windows and said it had been taking more and more work just to keep them livable.

To update them, though, would cost around $50,000.

Even with the $30,000 raised at an April 1 fundraiser, plus the more than $40,000 in federal funding presented by MP Tracy Ramsey, that was a hurdle Inverarity said the camp wouldn’t have been able to leap. Fundraising organizers estimate the camp needs to bring in around $150,000 annually just to meet its operational costs. Inverarity said all the money raised so far will go towards meeting that requirement.

Members of local businesses, including Nor-Built Construction, BK Cornerstone, Santarossa J & Sons, Kehl Windows and Doors and Canflow Eavestroughs, stand beside local realtor Dan Inverarity (fourth from left) in the shell of a cabin at Kiwanis Sunshine Point Camp. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Members of local businesses, including Nor-Built Construction, BK Cornerstone, Santarossa J & Sons, Kehl Windows and Doors and Canflow Eavestroughs, stand beside local realtor Dan Inverarity (fourth from left) in the shell of a cabin at Kiwanis Sunshine Point Camp. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

There was no money left to build the cabins.

Local businesses like Nor-Built Construction, BK Cornerstone, Santarossa J & Sons, Kehl Windows and Doors, Canflow Eavestroughs and Home Hardware decided that wasn’t a problem. They donated both the materials and the manpower needed to raise the cabins in a single weekend. By next weekend, Inverarity hopes to have the siding in place.

“We’ll probably be putting the finishing touches on the paint as the kids walk through the doors,” he said. “Isn’t that how it always works with renovations?”

He said the new cabins are 20 per cent larger than the old ones, which allows each to sleep six campers in three sets of bunk beds. Inverarity also said the new cabins have improved airflow to keep the campers cool, locking windows and doors, a cement foundation and an overall better-quality build.

“They’ll probably last another 80 years without a problem,” he said. “Thank God for the local community. They donated everything. I didn’t cut a single cheque.”

Campers will get to experience the new cabins when the camp opens in nine weeks.

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