Essex County celebrates Canada 150 by burying time capsule, dunking politicians

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The County of Essex celebrated Canada 150 last Friday and hopes that people 100 years from now will remember what 2017 was like.

An outdoor celebration took place at the Essex Civic Centre with one of the main attractions being the burying of a time capsule that isn’t supposed to be opened for another 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

The event was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

County CAO Brian Gregg said in addition to it being Canada 150, it is also the 225th anniversary of the formation of Essex County. When it is opened, the county will be celebrating its 325th anniversary, he noted.

“The contents of this capsule features artifacts from all seven of the county’s municipalities,” Gregg pointed out.

Gregg said the capsule was buried on the grounds of the civic centre under a “symbolic maple tree” and will give a “snapshot” of the past when it is eventually opened. Gregg, who is retiring later this year, said he has spent over 30 years with the County of Essex and has seen it grow.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

“I can only imagine what is in store for the next 100 years,” he said.

Warden Tom Bain said the Canada 150 event was “about honouring our history, relishing our present and looking forward to our future.”

Bain, who would later be one of the politicians and administration members to get wet in the dunk tank, also pointed out the 225th anniversary for the county. Bain stated Essex County has a rich history as he said it was the first county in Ontario to be formed prior to Confederation and the road that is now County Road 20 was the first road to be laid out in Ontario.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

A number of children attended the Canada 150 celebration and the warden told them to learn from both successes and failures.

“Do not forget the words collaboration, communication, kindness, and my favourite word, teamwork,” said Bain.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

The event also featured children’s activities, the formation of county officials into a human Canada 150 logo, a barbecue and the appearance of the Memorial Cup, the junior hockey trophy captured by the Windsor Spitfires.

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