Corey Meloche Charity Hockey Game remembers two that died young

 

Tamara Siddall drops the puck in between honourary General Amherst Lady Gen Mackenzie Siddall and Villanova captain Julia Piganelli. Kevin Siddall was one of the two young athletes memorialized at the April 9 Corey Meloche Charity Game.

Tamara Siddall drops the puck in between honourary General Amherst Lady Gen Mackenzie Siddall and Villanova captain Julia Piganelli. Kevin Siddall was one of the two young athletes memorialized at the April 9 Corey Meloche Charity Game.

Ben Meloche, joined by Darlene and Hayley Melcohe, honours his mother Corey by dropping a ceremonial puck.

Ben Meloche, joined by Darlene and Hayley Melcohe, honours his mother Corey by dropping a ceremonial puck.

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Corey Meloche was remembered again this year in a charity game named in her honour but another young athlete that died young this year joined her.

Kevin Siddall, a 14-year-old Windsor youth who succumbed to cancer earlier this year, was also remembered as part of last Wednesday night’s Corey Meloche Charity Game at the Libro Centre.

Proceeds from the hockey game were split between the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation – the charity designated in honour of Meloche – while the charity chosen by the Siddall family was the Ronald McDonald House. Meloche’s son Ben dropped the puck at one of the ceremonial faceoffs while Tamara Siddall, Kevin’s mother, dropped the puck during the other.

General Amherst’s girls hockey team downed Villanova’s girl’s hockey team 3-0 with Mackenzie Siddall, Kevin’s older sister, playing for Amherst that night. She also participated in the ceremonial puck drop with her mother.

Mackenzie said it was an honour the game was played in memory of her brother and that her brother was “a great individual.

“It’s really encouraging to see the impact he made on the community. It’s a good feeling,” she said.

Ronald McDonald House was chosen because that is where the family stayed while Kevin was hospitalized in London.

“It’s a really good cause,” said Mackenzie, adding that the Ronald McDonald House allows people to stay with loved ones “as long as they need to.”

“It’s a great honour,” added Tamara. “We are appreciative of all the efforts the community has put in for Kevin.”

Despite the Siddall family being from Windsor, Tamara said she was not surprised the outpouring of support has spread to Amherstburg. She said the family has been touched from all the support area high schools and organizations have shown the family.

“Nothing surprises us with all the support the community has given us,” she added.

Dan and Darlene Meloche praised event organizer Dan Pettypiece for putting the game on again this year. Pettypiece, an assistant coach with the General Amherst girls program, was the head coach for the first seven years and was coach when Corey Meloche died in a snowmobile accident in 2010.

“Every year Dan does this and he is an amazing guy,” said Darlene. “He’s done so much in keeping Corey’s memory alive.”

Darlene added it was nice this year to be able to share it with the Siddall family, adding she hopes they receive the same level of support they did after Corey died.

Dan Meloche said they met the Siddalls for the first time Wednesday night but said they were able to relate to them when they heard Kevin had died.

“People don’t realize when you see another child has been lost, you are with (the family),” he said. “It stays with you. It doesn’t go away.”

Darlene added they are proud of both teams for keeping Corey’s memory alive and remain grateful to Pettypiece for his efforts.

 

 

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