News

ERCA seeking feedback on horseback riding on local trails

 

 

Special to the RTT

 

The Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA) is hoping to hear from a variety of greenway user groups on the matter of expanding horseback riding on the greenway trail system.

“Some equestrians have approached ERCA about expanding the sections of trail upon which horses are permitted,” explains Kevin Money, ERCA’s Director of Conservation Services. “We want to hear from all user groups in order to ensure we are making a balanced decision.”

Presently, horses are permitted on rural sections of the Chrysler Canada Greenway. The rules for horseback use are that riders of horses must use the grassed area to the side of the trail and clean up their horse droppings.

ERCA is seeking input on whether users of local trails would like to see them available for horseback riding. The entrance to the Cypher Systems Greenway, looking east from Thomas Road, is photographed.

The new Cypher Systems Group Greenway, which stretches 26 kilometres from Essex to Amherstburg, does not currently permit horse use.

“The Cypher Systems Group Greenway was just opened last year, and the trail needed an opportunity to settle prior to considering horse use. Currently, we are researching rules, design and maintenance standards of other trail owners such as municipalities and Conservation Authorities to help with the decision making process,” said Money.

The survey is available online at www.essexregionconservation.ca.

For more than four decades, Essex Region Conservation has been sustaining and enriching the environment of the Windsor-Essex-Pelee Island region to ensure it is the Place for Life.

 

 

Rotary Club of Amherstburg earns 2018 Fire Safety Award

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A project undertaken by the Rotary Club of Amherstburg, in partnership with the Amherstburg Fire Department and Amherstburg Community Services, has resulted in an award for Rotary.

The Rotary Club has received a 2018 Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council Fire Safety Award. Rotarians Laura George and Carl Gibb were in Toronto recently to pick up the award.

“It was a total surprise,” said George, who was president in 2017 when the project was initiated. “(Amherstburg Fire) Chief (Bruce) Montone came up to us at a council meeting and said he had nominated us.”

The project was to have carbon monoxide (CO) alarms placed in the homes of those in need, such as seniors or low income households.

“Out of 11 recipients, two were Rotary Clubs which says a lot for what Rotary does in their communities,” said George.

George said over 600 carbon monoxide alarms were purchased. The Rotary Club, with funds generated by the Ribfest, contributed $2,500 and obtained a matching grant of $2,500 through Rotary International. The town contributed another $2,500, George added.

“It was nice to get to work with Chief Montone. It was one of his first projects when he came to Amherstburg.”

The Rotary Club of Amherstburg received a a 2018 Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council Fire Safety Award in Toronto recently. From left: Amherstburg deputy fire chief Paul Acton, chair of the awards committee Dan Langlois, Rotarians Carl Gibb and Laura George, Amherstburg fire chief Bruce Montone and Fire Marshal of Ontario Ross Nichols. (Special to the RTT)

George and Gibb thanked ACS for their assistance as well, as ACS helped identify homes that the CO alarms went into.

“If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t have been able to keep the project going,” said George.

The idea was generated thanks to a similar project done by the Rotary Club of Amherstburg, as several years ago, the local club embarked on a smoke detector project.

“If not for all of the volunteers and the hours they put in at Ribfest, we wouldn’t have been able to do what we did,” George added, noting “it’s nice to keep the money locally.”

Montone called working with the Rotary Club and ACS “a significant partnership.”

“It was beginning to unfold when I arrived in Amherstburg,” said Montone.

The partnership had a positive impact on those who are most vulnerable and noted he was able to reach out to First Alert so that the donated funds could be used to purchase the CO alarms at cost rather than at retail value.

“That has a significant impact on the number of people you are protecting,” said Montone.

Noting there were 600 CO alarms purchased, the fire chief noted that translates into roughly 3,000 people who are protected.

“That is worthy of being recognized,” said Montone. “It was awesome (the Rotary Club of Amherstburg) was selected.

Local artist gets involved with “Beads of Courage” charitable organization

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A local woman is the “artist of the month” for July for a charitable organization helping people, many of who are children, who have serious illnesses.

Morgan Deschaine was selected by “Beads of Courage” after applying online. The beads, which are often used to comfort children with illnesses, were shipped recently though Deschaine pointed out the 100 small pink pigs she created will be sold by the organization as a way to fundraise.

The lampwork artist said she is involved with the Beads of Courage organization that is based out of Arizona. She said that chapter assists over 150 sites and the beads help those with cancer and blood disorders, cardiac conditions, burn injuries, those with chronic illness, adult oncology patients and those in NICU.

“Every year, they have a different theme,” said Deschaine. “This year, it’s animals. I applied to be the artist of the month for July. I submitted my pigs and they loved them.”

Amherstburg resident Morgan Deschaine was selected as Beads of Courage’s “artist of the month” for July. She shows the pigs she created so that the agency can sell them as a fundraiser.

Deschaine said she has been a lampwork artist for the last eight years.

“I call it a smaller scale of glass blowing,” she said. “We make beads on a torch.”

The Amherstburg resident says she got hooked when she went on a trip with her family and saw a demonstration of lampwork art. She took one lesson but is primarily self-taught.

“Now I teach it,” she said.

Deschaine said she originally came across Beads of Courage through Facebook. She added there aren’t a lot of beads of pigs and she enjoys making them, noting they take about 12-15 minutes per pig to make.

She has been making the pigs for Beads of Courage since the beginning of May, stating she does it on the side as she has a full-time job. She stated the Beads of Courage helps more than 60,000 children in eight countries record and tell their own stories using the colourful beads “as meaningful symbols of courage and hope along their treatment journey.”

Amherstburg Rotary Ribfest draws 13,000 people

By Ron Giofu

 

Great weather, great music and great food were the reasons organizers of the Amherstburg Rotary Ribfest were pleased with last weekend.

The ninth annual Ribfest was held at Centennial Park with four ribbers, a selection of other food vendors, craft vendors, bouncy castles and a full lineup of entertainment available for the thousands that came through the gates.

When all was said and done, organizers are reporting that 13,000 came to the Ribfest.

“They loved the bands,” said Ribfest committee chair Carl Gibb. “The weather really helped. The weather and the entertainment brings (the people) out. People like coming out and enjoying the ribs.”

Not only do the ribbers travel from outside the area to come to Amherstburg, but Gibb noted many other food and craft vendors do as well.

“The Golden Onion came all the way from Montreal,” said Gibb, noting others came from London, Chatham and the Toronto area.

“They come from all over,” he said.

Gibb believed this was one of the better years for the Ribfest but the location of future years remains up in the air. Meetings still have to occur with the Town of Amherstburg on a future location as 15 of the 27 acres of Centennial Park have been sold to the Greater Essex County District School Board for a new public high school.

Anthony Liu from Fat Boys BBQ shows some of the ribs he was barbecuing.

“We’ll have to sit down with them and see,” said Gibb.

Gibb also thanked the crowd for coming out. During brief remarks delivered from the stage Friday night, he told the public “your support of the Ribfest and the Rotary Club is always appreciated. We do this for you.”

Planning, he said, takes up the better part of a year.

Brooke Bratt, Brooke Meloche and Patty Cazabon were three of the people that attended Friday night.

“We love it,” said Bratt. “It’s so much fun. We come every year.”

Between the food, including the blooming onions, and music, Bratt said the Ribfest is “amazing.”

“Go Amherstburg!” she said. “Thank you to Amherstburg for having something like this.”

The ribbers also enjoyed their weekend, including those from Fat Boys BBQ.

“It’s amazing,” said Haley Johnson. “Everyone is so great. We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback.”

“Everyone is really friendly,” added Amanda Gallagher. “They are really good tippers.”

Approximately 13,000 came to Centennial Park the weekend of July 6-8 for the Amherstburg Rotary Ribfest. It is expected to be the last year at Centennial Park.

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo thanked the Rotary Club of Amherstburg and its Ribfest committee for “putting on a successful event this year.”

“It should not be a secret that this is a very important part of Amherstburg’s festival lineup,” said DiCarlo. “I couldn’t think of Amherstburg’s summer festival season without the Ribfest.”

Rotary Club president Joan Donaldson also thanked the Ribfest committee as well as all the judges that tasted the sauces and ribs Sunday afternoon. Donaldson said Rotary is an international organization that is a leader in its community, with one of its goals being the eradication of polio.

Buck Twenty was the headliner Friday night at the Ribfest. An entertainment committee led by Rick Rock and John D’Alimonte kept the music flowing for the three-day festival.

Winners from Ribfest saw Dinosaur BBQ Pit win in the best ribs category as ranked by the judges, with Ribs Royale coming in second and Texas Rangers third. The judges’ best sauce awards saw Dinosaur win first place followed by Ribs Royale and Fat Boys Barbecue. The People’s Choice award for sauce saw Dinosaur win again, with the public also agreeing with the judges by ranking Ribs Royale and Fat Boys second and third.

Ribs Royale were the people’s choice for best ribs, followed by Dinosaur and Fat Boys.

To see more photos from the ninth annual Amherstburg Rotary Ribfest, view our Facebook album.

Discretionary spending, finding efficiencies among key issues for Moore

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The vote to contract out policing in Amherstburg to the Windsor Police Service was the big factor for Gregory Moore and his decision to run for town council.

Moore is seeking the position of councillor and said the Feb. 26 policing vote made by the current council is what caused him to decide to run. Moore said he is in opposition to the switch.

“That was the last thing that pushed me over the edge was the farming out of Amherstburg police,” said Moore. “I think the police are a big part of our community. The police and our community go hand-in-hand.”

Moore said that he has watched the decisions council has made the last few years and decided he wants to try and get on council himself.

“I guess I can’t complain if I’m not willing to do something,” he said.

The town’s debt is still large, said Moore, and that a closer look has to be had on the town’s discretionary spending.

“I think that’s a real issue that needs to be looked at,” said Moore.

Gregory Moore is running for the
position of councillor in the Oct. 22 municipal election.

Moore suggested the possibility of the town retaining ownership of the Libro Centre but having a private company manage it in order to reduce the financial liability that operating an arena carries. He said that Duffy’s is synonymous with Amherstburg but wonders if the town was right in purchasing Belle Vue and the former St. Bernard School site when they did.

“If you look at the situation, we can’t afford Belle Vue,” he believed. “We can’t afford St. Bernard School. We really can’t afford these as a town right now.”

If it were not for the debt, Moore stated, “It might be a totally different story.”

Moore stated: “I think spending needs to be frozen for council, the mayor and the CAO until further notice.”

Moore believed the town needs to be “creative” in its operations so that no additional pressures are placed on taxpayers. That includes a look at every town department.

“Everything needs to be looked at. Efficiencies need to be created,” said Moore.

Moore feels the town is on the same footing it was four years ago.

“I think it’s a wash,” he said. “I don’t see it being any better or any worse.”

There are certain expenditures that have to be made, with Moore citing rural roads as an example.

“The roads are worse out there,” he said. “These roads need to be fixed. These are needs, not wants.”

“Rising water and sewage rates need to be reined in,” he stated. “These costs really impact middle income families as well as looking for alternative measures to avoid continual property tax increases.

Moore said he would like to see more activities for both youth and seniors, including programming by the town for seniors that could be merged with existing groups.

More room for fishing from the shoreline is needed in town, stated Moore.

“I believe I can bring something completely different to the table,” he said.

Moore works at Chrysler and has lived in Amherstburg for 20 years after growing up in Harrow. He serves on his church’s board in Colchester. He also fought the province’s sexual education curriculum serval years ago.

“My family has a very long history here in Amherstburg,” he added. “We are direct descendants of the Underground Railroad. My great grandfather Albert Wilson was in fact born here on the shores of Amherstburg after his mom made an escape swimming across the Detroit River.”