Amherstburg Rhododendron Committee’s rhodo and azalea sale returns this weekend

 

 

Liz and Paul Morneau from the Amherstburg Rhododendron Committee stand near the rhododendron beds in King's Navy Yard Park. The committee will be hosting its rhododendron and azalea sale for two straight Saturdays starting this Saturday in a clubhouse facility near Centennial Park. Hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Liz and Paul Morneau from the Amherstburg Rhododendron Committee stand near the rhododendron beds in King’s Navy Yard Park. The committee will be hosting its rhododendron and azalea sale for two straight Saturdays starting this Saturday in a field house facility near Centennial Park. Hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

By Ron Giofu

 

The Amherstburg Rhododendron Committee’s rhododendron and azalea sale returns to town this weekend after not being staged last year.

The committee will hold its sale in a clubhouse near AMA Arena on Victoria St. S. this Saturday from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and again May 3 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Liz Morneau, secretary of the committee, said there will be a variety of plants and volunteers to tell people how to plant and maintain them.

“As always, we have some unique varieties you won’t find in nurseries,” said Liz, whose husband Paul is committee president.

The Morneaus recently returned from Niagara Falls where they picked up some special plants for the sale. Most prices start from $20 but Paul indicated there will be a “bargain corner” where plants from previous years will be offered for cheaper prices.

Paul added that the committee maintains rhododendron and azalea beds in local parks such as King’s Navy Yard Park, with the work done by local volunteers at the committee’s expense. He said they spent $2,600 on soil conditioners last year alone.

“A lot of people don’t realize that,” said Paul.

The Morneaus caution that rhododendrons have suffered through the winter with many being “burned” due to the prolonged cold as the plant couldn’t pull moisture from the ground with the latter being frozen for such a long time. However, they expect most of the plants will bounce back.

“All of these are hearty for the area,” said Liz. “They are resilient plants. They don’t need a lot of care, just a little watering.”

The Amherstburg Rhododendron Committee is a non-profit corporation with roughly eight members.

Comments are closed.