Amherstburg author takes murder mystery writing skills on the road

 

“Olga,” aka Jessica Jarvis, explains to “Katerina” (Jeanne Papak) why a pysanky was smashed. The performance was part of the “Who Poached the Pysanky?” murder mystery play written by John Schlarbaum of Amherstburg and staged at Sts. Vladimir and Olga Catholic Church in south Windsor. Many of the actors in the murder mystery were also from Amherstburg.

“Olga,” aka Jessica Jarvis, explains to “Katerina” (Jeanne Papak) why a pysanky was smashed. The performance was part of the “Who Poached the Pysanky?” murder mystery play written by John Schlarbaum of Amherstburg and staged at Sts. Vladimir and Olga Catholic Church in south Windsor. Many of the actors in the murder mystery were also from Amherstburg.

 

Kevin Jarvis (right) as “Peter” tries to explain “Peter's” position as part of the “Who Poached the Pysanky?” murder mystery as Jeanne Papak (as “Katerina”) reacts. It was the third murder mystery event authored by Amherstburg author John Schlarbaum.

Kevin Jarvis (right) as “Peter” tries to explain “Peter’s” position as part of the “Who Poached the Pysanky?” murder mystery as Jeanne Papak (as “Katerina”) reacts. It was the third murder mystery event authored by Amherstburg author John Schlarbaum.

Special to the RTT

 

Amherstburg writer and playwright John Schlarbaum is used to plotting clues for his popular P.I. Steve Cassidy and newspaper reporter Jennifer Malone novels, but he’s getting a reputation as a skilled mystery author of plays as well.

After two highly successful interactive works of his were performed as fundraisers for local art galleries and museums, Schlarbaum was approached by the Sts. Vladimir and Olga Catholic Church to create a new storyline for a dinner theatre fundraiser, to support their outreach programs.

Accompanied by a team of local residents, Schlarbaum’s work came to light recently as over 110 people enjoyed “Who Poached The Pysanky?”

Schlarbaum stated the new play “incorporates the beauty of the Ukrainian art of colourfully painted eggs with the dark side of jealousy, betrayal and theft.” The local residents assumed different characters with the amateur detectives trying to solve the mystery of who stole a coloured egg – or “pysanky” – after a show.

“Although the themes of my plays often sound frightening on paper, when the amateur detectives begin to question the suspects the result is a very entertaining and fun evening,” Schlarbaum says. “Like my novels, I make sure each case is solvable, sprinkling clues about the guilty culprit through the accounts of the other cast members. It’s up to the amateur detectives to piece together these items and then vote for their top pick at the end of the night. In this instance, it was up to them to crack the case!”

For those who have enjoyed Schlarbaum’s previous plays, The Bicencriminal Murder and The Diary of Death, he believed this smaller scaled mystery was just as fun.

“Essentially, it’s a live action Clue game with a fantastic dinner included,” the author states. “For mystery fans and their family and friends it was an enjoyable night out together, as well as a great fundraiser event.”

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