Vow of silence

Amherstburg Public School taking a vow of silence

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School will be going silent April 26 even though it will be a regular school day.

The school will be holding its third annual “Vow of Silence” next Wednesday and held a kickoff assembly to promote the event last Thursday morning. The “Vow of Silence” event is being organized by the Grade 7 classes taught by Melisa Mulcaster and Joanie Cotter.

Amherstburg Public School students will try to “Be the Change” as they will hold their third annual vow of silence April 26. The students are going silent so that less fortunate children and those who are bullied can have a voice of their own. A kickoff assembly was held April 13.

Amherstburg Public School students will try to “Be the Change” as they will hold their third annual vow of silence April 26. The students are going silent so that less fortunate children and those who are bullied can have a voice of their own. A kickoff assembly was held April 13.

“We’re going to be silent for the day,” explained student Erica Ayres. “We’re going to be silent for those less fortunate and those who don’t have access to basic human rights or clean water.”

“We are falling silent to give others a voice,” added classmate Breanna Lee. “Sometimes we take our human rights for granted.”

Lee noted that children in third world countries don’t have the same privileges they do with Ayres adding that some children in poor countries have to walk kilometres to get water that might not even be clean.

“People think that because you’re one person, it won’t make a difference, but it will,” said Ayres.

The Grade 7 classes showed the rest of the school a video showing those who are bullied and those in poorer countries need to have a voice.

“First world problems aren’t problems,” said Lee.

Ingrid Heugh speaks to Amherstburg Public School students on behalf of Save African Child Uganda (SACU). Heugh is a retired Amherstburg Public School teacher.

Ingrid Heugh speaks to Amherstburg Public School students on behalf of Save African Child Uganda (SACU). Heugh is a retired Amherstburg Public School teacher.

The classes are also trying to raise money to support two children they sponsor in Uganda through the Save African Child Uganda (SACU) program. Through the sale of T-shirts, they hope to allow the children – named Ronald and Hadijah – to stay in their Ugandan village and get an education.

Ingrid Heugh, a retired Amherstburg Public School teacher who now volunteers with SACU, said SACU now educates 145 students in Uganda. The students are fed breakfast and lunch each day.

Heugh said the children in Uganda want to be educated and that SACU is trying to help them.

“We all have rights because we are human,” said Heugh.

Amherstburg Public School’s “Vow of Silence” exceeds its goal

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School’s #BeTheChange campaign and its accompanying “vow of silence” hit its targets for 2016.

The recent initiative, led by Melisa Mulcaster’s Grade 7 class, raised $832 with the goal being $700. #BeTheChange was to recognize those children who can’t normally speak for themselves with the proceeds being donated to Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

Mulcaster said that allows the school to feed the entire village in Uganda that SACU supports with bananas and oatmeal.

Students at Amherstburg Public School held their "vow of silence" May 5 and raised $832 for Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

Students at Amherstburg Public School held their “vow of silence” May 5 and raised $832 for Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

“The students showed an amazing amount of dedication and compassion towards this cause!” said Mulcaster. “We are beyond proud of the APS student body. When they set their mind to something, they achieve it. Ronald and Hadijah sent us a video all the way from Uganda and are thrilled about their sponsorship! It’s definitely a feel good initiative!”

Students took to heart what they were doing and were eager to help children who don’t have basic human rights or freedoms such as the ability to go to school.

“I cannot believe why all this stuff is happening and we do nothing to stop it,” said Dakota Lucier. “It’s not good and we really have to do something about it.”

As for why he was participating in the “vow of silence,” Spencer Gallant stated “I can’t believe how some people live in poor countries. When we are young, we are full of joy but in some countries, kids are in fear and pain.”

“A lot of things like this are going on all the time and we tend to brush them off thinking ‘well, this is not my problem’,” added Nigel Harte. “But the truth is, it is your problem and it is my problem. It’s all of our problem.”

Some students observed the #BeTheChange vow of silence with tape over their mouths and cards around their necks explaining what they were doing. (Special to the RTT)

Some students observed the #BeTheChange vow of silence with tape over their mouths and cards around their necks explaining what they were doing. (Special to the RTT)

Hayden Zimmermann added: “Food, water, basic health care – these are the things we need to use to stop poverty. If we get together, we can convince the government to save a bit of money so we can get the countries in poverty the things they need for a year and then they can improve their country.

Another student, Tyler Ryan, stated “these kids need our help. Every day we complain about how our Internet sucks or how pizza can be expensive while these kids can’t even feel the satisfaction of a warm slice of pizza or even the wonderful feeling of cold water tricking down their throats.”

Harley Brooker said they participated in the silent day for the second year in a row to support the children who can’t speak up for themselves and to put themselves in their place to see how it feels to have no voice.

“We are trying to raise awareness,” said Brooker. “We are not the only ones who need fresh water or education. We are all human beings.”

“I am doing this is to show I care, that I want to make a change,” added Karlie Simon, “to say ‘I know you’re there and I want to help.”

Amherstburg Public students want to #BeTheChange for less fortunate children

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School students will fall silent on Thursday to recognize other children who are not as fortunate as they are.

The school’s second annual “vow of silence” will take place for all or part of the day, depending on grade level, and it is being organized by Melisa Mulcaster’s Grade 7 class.

“This a pledge the students take to commit to no talking, texting, or social media during the school day,” said Mulcaster. “They are raising awareness and standing together in solidarity for those who are denied their voice and basic human rights every day. Students from JK-8 will all take on this challenge in different amounts of time depending on their age. The intermediates have committed to the entire day.”

“It’s basically about kids who don’t have the right to say anything,” noted student Carlisa Elliott.

Grade 7 students at Amherstburg Public School are leading a “vow of silence” this Thursday with an assembly to kick it off being last Friday. THey are using the hashtag #BeTheChange to promote the cause.

Grade 7 students at Amherstburg Public School are leading a “vow of silence” this Thursday with an assembly to kick it off being last Friday. THey are using the hashtag #BeTheChange to promote the cause.

Classmate Nigel Harte added that a lot of children are bullied and some don’t have fresh water to drink or enough food to eat.

Rachel Jones said they were part of an assembly to promote the vow of silence and to stand with children who don’t have a voice in their lives. Abby Gorgerat said it is for those who simply don’t have basic human rights while Harley Brooker added children in some countries are unable to go to school.

Amherstburg Public raised $600 and sponsored two children from Save African Child Uganda (SACU). “This year, we want to be able to continue sponsoring them and providing them with the education, food and medical assistance they so desperately need,” said Mulcaster. “APS is committed to making a difference. Their theme is #BeTheChange and they are extremely dedicated and compassionate towards this cause. We want to show the community we care, and we can make a difference in the lives of others.”
The fundraising target this year is $700.

Students will also be out in the community promoting their cause during Thursday’s school day.