Leo Meloche

Hazen Price recognized for his 95th birthday, seven decades in Rotary

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Rotary Club of Amherstburg paid tribute to its longest-serving member last week though he was a little taken aback at being the centre of attention.

“I don’t think I’m going to live long enough to live up to the expectations,” quipped Hazen Price, as he addressed fellow Rotarians and guests last Wednesday night at Royal Canadian Legion Br. 157.

The Rotary Club of Amherstburg presented a special celebration in Price’s honour as Price has now been a Rotarian for 70 years. He also was honoured for his 95th birthday, which actually arrived last Saturday.

Despite honours from dignitaries and fellow Rotarians, Price remained humble and said after the celebration that he was “very embarrassed to say the least.” He said he has always enjoyed the fellowship within the club.

“I’ve always enjoyed the Rotary Club and I probably wouldn’t be here as long if I didn’t,” he said.

Councillor Leo Meloche (right) presents Hazen Price with recognition on behalf of the Town of Amherstburg. Price has been in the Rotary Club 70 years and just turned 95-years-old.

Price pointed out the saving of the Park House Museum as one of his major accomplishments, though his name has also been attached to the Gibson Gallery, Gibb House, John R. Park Homestead and a second pensioner’s cottage. The progress made to eradicate polio is another accomplishment Price has seen in his years in Rotary.

There have been changes to the club itself in his seven decades, Price noted. When he started, women were not allowed to be members. Attendance was also important early on, as regular meeting attendance was required but that has since been relaxed.

Price said he was the young member of the Rotary Club of Amherstburg when he first joined.

“Ol’ Doc Hutchinson Sr. came to the farm and asked if I would consider joining,” he recalled. “I was 20 years younger than everyone else.”

Despite being in an uncomfortable position as the guest of honour, Price said he was grateful for the kind thoughts and gifts.

“I appreciate their thoughts about the work I’ve done,” he said. “It’s really nice to be appreciated.”

Patti Hayes, outreach and community assistant with Essex MPP Taras Natyshak’s office, represented both Natyshak and Essex MP Tracey Ramsey.

“Your volunteerism is an inspiration to everyone,” said Hayes.

Rotary Club of Amherstburg president Dan Hunt (right) bestows praise on Hazen Price April 25. Price just turned 95-years-old and has been a Rotarian for 70 years.

Councillor Leo Meloche, representing the Town of Amherstburg, said he researched what it means to be a Rotarian, with his research concluding that “being a Rotarian is a way of life and can be a satisfying lifelong adventure for those who are willing to give of themselves to enjoy and benefit from all that Rotary has to offer.”

Meloche added that “Hazen Price truly exemplifies what a Rotarian is.”

Police chief Tim Berthiaume thanked Price “for all that you do” and said many don’t realize how much the Rotary Club accomplishes in the community. Price was presented a “Chief’s Award of Excellence” with Berthiaume stating that Price would have earned such recognition 50 years ago.

Assistant Rotary District Governor Peggy Little also thanked Price for his accomplishments and for his dedication with past District Governor Neil McBeth pointing out Price was one of the first people he met in Rotary.

“It is because of dedicated members like you that we are Rotarians making a difference,” said McBeth.

Laura George, a past president of the Rotary Club of Amherstburg, pointed out that a $100 donation was made to the Park House in Price’s honour. She called Price her biggest supporter and that when she was deciding whether or not Rotary was for her, Price gave her helpful advice.

“You have a very special place in my heart,” George told Price.

Rotary Club of Amherstburg president Dan Hunt also had kind words for Price.

“He is a very special man,” said Hunt.

Town to fill in rumble strips, look at alternative measures

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The town is looking at alternative measures instead of having rumble strips on rural roads.

Town council voted Monday night to remove rumble strips from concessions and other rural roads they are on as a result of noise complaints filed by residents who live near them. The rumble strips will be filled in and replaced with increased signage, pavement markings, larger stop signs and additional flashing lights and beacons.

The Town of Amherstburg will also try and work with the County of Essex, where applicable, to resolve the issues.

The cost of $13,565 to carry out the work was deemed “very reasonable” to Councillor Diane Pouget.

“It’s a win-win situation,” said Pouget, believing safety measures were still being taken while at the same time, the noise from the rumble strips would be eliminated for nearby residents.

Councillor Rick Fryer said he didn’t have an issue with filling in the rumble strips, but suggested other measures in addition to more signage. He said there are areas, including some streets in Windsor, where a granular surface was placed on the road and painted over when road lines are put on. He wondered if that would help get a driver’s attention while, at the same time, not be a nuisance for people who live nearby.

“From the beginning, I said they were too deep,” Fryer said of the rumble strips.

Rumble strips, such as the ones pictured on Concession 3 North, will be filled in when the asphalt plants open. Town council agreed to fill the rumble strips in after several noise complaints were made by residents who live near the rumble strips throughout Amherstburg.

Fryer was concerned over foggy weather and distracted driving, adding “I just feel there’s got to be something else” in addition to the recommendations but something that wouldn’t negatively impact residents. Pouget added that alternative countermeasures were “part and parcel” of the motion

Councillor Leo Meloche said he measured the depth of the rumble strips in some areas and said they were “not that deep.”

“It’s the design that makes them so loud,” said Meloche.

Meloche indicated the number of rumble strips make the noise worse, as there are four to five sections where rumble strips are cut.

“If one doesn’t (get a driver’s attention), five won’t,” he said.

Michelle Poberezny, who lives near Concession 8 North and Middle Side Road, equates the rumble strips to having someone ring the doorbell five times every time a car went by.

“It significantly impacted our quality of life,” she said.

Poberezny said they can hear the noise at night while in bed and when a school bus goes by, dishes rattle in the cupboards.

“It literally gets on your last nerve,” she said.

Residents want the intersections to be safe, Poberezny added, but added that cyclists also have to ride around rumble strips putting them at risk.

“I think this is a good resolution,” she believed.

Dino Gidillini, who lives near Concession 3 North and Middle Side Road, wanted more empathy from council members, adding there was little to no remorse. He believed more research should have been done before the rumble strips were cut.

“It’s going to cost taxpayers money to fix this,” he said. “They should have done their homework first.” A report on Monday’s agenda, public works reviewed Ontario Traffic Manuals, related legislation and guidelines as well as policies from other municipalities. An engineer’s report said use of rumble strips are not recommended within 200-500 metres of residential areas.

Town council’s remuneration report for 2017 released

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

How much money were your elected officials paid in 2017?

The answer was revealed as part of the agenda for the March 19 town council meeting. Treasurer Justin Rousseau stated in his report to town council that municipal treasurers are required under Section 284 of the Municipal Act to provide their councils “an itemized statement of remuneration and expense payments in the previous year.”

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo’s total remuneration was $45,071.97 for 2017. That includes his salary at $32,506.70 with the remainder including his $7,040 in remuneration (salary, meeting fees and travel/mileage) from being on the Essex Powerlines board as well as his communication allowance, per diem, public reception and travel and mileage from the town. He also earned $1,200 for being on the Amherstburg Police Service Board (APSB).

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale’s remuneration for 2017 was $22,430.90. The salary for being deputy mayor is $21,658.25 with the remainder being his legal fees, communication allowance, public receptions and travel and mileage.

All councillors earned a salary of $18,141.05.

The total remuneration for Councillor Rick Fryer was $22,303.87. That includes his salary, communication allowance and public receptions. Also included is Fryer’s remuneration for being on the ERCA board of directors, where he serves as the chair. His honorarium, per diem and mileage for being on the ERCA board totalled $2,767.

Councillor Joan Courtney’s total remuneration for 2017 was $22,071.56 That included her salary and the other associated expenses such as her communication allowance, training and conferences as well as her travel and mileage.

A total remuneration total of $21,533.09 was attributed to Councillor Leo Meloche for 2017. That included his salary plus his communication allowance, public receptions, training and conferences and travel and mileage.

Councillor Diane Pouget’s total 2017 remuneration was $19,869.39. That included her salary plus communication and legal fees.

Councillor Jason Lavigne had a total remuneration of $19,386.02. That includes his salary plus public receptions as well as his $1,200 honorarium for being on the APSB.

Also receiving $1,200 APSB honorariums were Bob Rozankovic and Patricia Simone. Ron Sutherland received $1,150.80 for his mileage and per diem being Amherstburg’s second appointee to the ERCA board of directors.

Appointees to the committee of adjustment who received $975 in 2017 included Sherry Ducedre, Duncan Smith and Donald Shaw while Michael Prue and David Cozens each earned $900. Simon Chamely and Shirley Curson-Prue from the heritage committee went to the Ontario Heritage Conference last year and their expenses were $1,511.94 and $1,668.14 respectively. William Whittal’s honorarium for being on the accessibility committee was $300 for the year while the honorariums, training and mileage expenses for the drainage board members – Robert Bezaire, Brad Laramie, Allan Major, Bob Pillon and Ron Sutherland – totalled $4,663.97 for 2016.

Council members look for resolution on rumble strip issue

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The fate of rumble strips, the grooves in the pavement near rural intersections, may be learned next month.

Town council is expected to receive a report in April on the matter, it was learned, after Councillor Leo Meloche brought the matter forward at the most recent town council meeting. Meloche said the noise being made by people driving over the rumble strips is still a problem for many who live near them.

“We have to address this one way or another,” said Meloche. “I’m asking when.”

Director of planning, development and legislative services Mark Galvin said his recommendation was to wait as administration gathers best practices from other municipalities.

Council was also told that the town has changed the engineering firm that was looking into the issue. However, Meloche wanted a solution sooner than later, suggesting that some rumble strips could be filled in when the asphalt plants re-open for the season.

“We’ve got to get urgency into this matter,” said Meloche. “I don’t think a whole summer of this would be pleasing to any of us.”

CAO John Miceli stated administration is performing its due diligence into the matter but Councillor Rick Fryer said rumble strips in other areas of the province that he has travelled don’t result in the same level of noise as the rumble strips in the rural areas of Amherstburg.

“The depth is too deep,” he said, though public works officials informed him the most recent installation was at a quarter-inch depth as recommended by the county. Galvin added that rumble strips in other areas may have been carved some time ago and have worn down, as compared to the “fresh” rumble strips that are in Amherstburg.

A report is expected to be before town council April 9.

Town council, business owners participate in workshops on Community Improvement Plan

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Town of Amherstburg and its partners from Monteith Brown Planning Consultants held workshops last week where people got a chance to give input towards the Community Improvement Plan (CIP) and urban design guidelines.

The workshops were held at the Libro Centre March 5 with business owners invited during the afternoon session while town council received an opportunity to participate during a late-afternoon meeting.

A series of questions were put to the participants with those involved asked to brainstorm answers. Questions included what is most important to you in the downtown core and what is missing, what is the biggest opportunity to attract visitors, what are the biggest challenges for attracting businesses to Amherstburg, how can the town improve its street facades and how to incorporate heritage into designs.

Members of town council and administration discuss the Community Improvement Plan (CIP) and urban design guidelines during a workshop held at the Libro Centre last Monday night.

Answers ranged from the obvious – the need for a hotel – with others including a desire for increased accessibility, downtown Wi-Fi, more parking, better traffic flow, transportation and a more accessible waterfront.

Manager of planning services Rebecca Belanger said 60 businesses were invited to the afternoon session with 15 people showing up. At the session with council a few hours later, Mayor Aldo DiCarlo and councillors Leo Meloche, Diane Pouget and Rick Fryer joined members of administration in participating in the sessions.

There were some council members concerned the study didn’t go far enough.

Fryer said “you need to look at other areas rather than the downtown,” believing more attention should be paid to smaller hamlets. Meloche said having a busy downtown core is important but so too are the other areas of town.

“Building a vibrant downtown core will lead to trickling into other areas,” said Meloche.

Consultant Michael Clarke from Monteith Brown Planning Consultants listens to some of the conversations.

Meloche added that other areas are sometimes “forgotten” and that more attention should be paid to them, but Pouget said the downtown was the mandate of this particular study. She said the next council may proceed with a larger project.

Belanger said policies in the town’s Official Plan direct how to go forward with the CIP and that if the town were to look at secondary settlement areas, it “may be a larger process” as amendments to the Official Plan might have to occur.

CAO John Miceli said businesses and developers will need to get on board when the plan is implemented. As for the Duffy’s property, he said it is at the environmental assessment (EA) stage now and that further development is included in the 2019 capital budget.