Gibson Gallery

“Hyperrealism” by local youth artist on exhibit at the Gibson Gallery

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The work of Madison Young has made it to the Gibson Gallery.

The local teenager’s work is now on exhibit at the gallery, with previous displays of her work having been at G.L. Heritage Brewing Co. and the former Mudpuppy Gallery.

“This is my first exhibit at the Gibson Gallery. It’s really special to me,” said Young.

Young said she was pleased that, as a 16-year-old, she was able to get her own exhibit at the gallery.

“It’s a really great feeling as an artist,” she said. “Thank you to the Gibson Gallery for giving me this opportunity.”

Young, who just completed Grade 10 at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School, is hopeful the more exposure she receives will allow her to continue to have exhibits at art galleries.

“To have this whole room to myself is really special,” she said.

There are both original works and prints as part of the current “Hyperrealism” exhibit. She uses mediums such as pencil, markers, pastels and has now added an oil painting to her growing collection.

“I’ve been selling a lot of them,” she said, but noted some of the works that are part of the exhibit are not for sale.

Local artist Madison Young is the current artist with an exhibit at The Gibson Gallery. Young’s “Hyperrealism” exhibit runs through July 29.

Young added she has been hearing a lot of good input on her art.

“The feedback has been super-positive,” said Young. “It’s been great.”

Noting she has been drawing since she was three or four, Young said she started getting into hyperrealism when she was 12-years-old.

“I drew a cupcake and that turned out well,” she said. “I decided to pursue it and now I’m here.”

Young defines hyperrealism as drawing something and having it really look the object she was drawing, including using the colours needed to make it look as real as possible.

Young will be one of the exhibitors during Art by the River, which is scheduled for Aug. 25-26 at Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada.

The opening reception for “Hyperrealism” was last Saturday afternoon, but Young is also having a closing reception July 28 from 2-4 p.m. The exhibit runs through July 29.

“It’s been super fun already and I’m excited to meet as many people as I can,” she said.

For more information on Young and her work, visit www.diamonddraws.com.

The Gibson Gallery is open daily from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and is located at 140 Richmond St. For more information, visit www.gibsonartgallery.com or call 519-736-2826. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.

“In Pursuit of the Golden Key” wraps up, key found

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

When the finale of the “In Pursuit of the Golden Key” treasure hunt was being planned, organizers knew they had at least one person with the correct numbers from the numerical part of the challenge.

Finding the actual key, however, was anticipated to continue.

That was until the Bombardier family stepped in.

The Bombardiers, who live in Essex, are comprised of parents Jamie and Renée and sons Eric, Logan and Jeremy. Renée said they worked “off and on” on the project since it began six years ago.

What was the key to finding the key?

“The key (to solving it) was a lot of coding,” said Renée. “We started reading the coding back.”

The Bombardier family discovered the key was located at a corner fence post at 291 Ramsay St. For finding the key and solving the mathematical equations in the book, the family received the entire $10,000 grand prize. The $5,000 portion for finding the key was expected to be donated, but the family found the key in the final days of the contest.

“It’s so surreal,” said Renée. “I still can’t really believe it.”

Renée said there haven’t been any firm decisions as for what to do with the money.

“We have to have to have a family sit-down and see where it goes,” she stated.

“We did promise (the boys) from the beginning that we’d split it with them,” added Jamie.

Artists Stephen Gibb (left) and Dennis White (second from right) present the Bombardier family with a $10,000 cheque for solving the “In the Golden Key” treasure hunt. The wrap up party was held last Thursday night at the Gibson Gallery, where the exhibit wrapping up the treasure hunt concluded. The Bombardier family includes sons Eric, Logan and Jeremy and parents Jamie and Renée.

The Bombardier family did tout the educational component of the project, stating they learned a lot about the area’s history. They still encourage people to try the treasure hunt anyway, even though the prize money has been claimed.

“I’m kind of sad it’s over,” Renée admitted.

“In Pursuit of the Golden Key” was created by local artists Dennis White and Stephen Gibb with their paintings being featured as part of the exhibit at the Gibson Gallery that has just wrapped up. The key was created by Precision Jewellers.

“It’s been a long six years,” said White. “It’s been great and not so great at times.”

White said it was a project that they were tied to and he was starting to wonder if anyone was ever going to find the golden key.

“I was beginning to think it was never going to be solved,” he said.

After wondering if there were mistakes that would present people from finding the golden key, White said he reviewed the book and the clues inside it.

“I went to my studio and I studied it and studied it,” he said. “I realized it could be solved.”

Two people actually ended up with the correct mathematical equations and one other person was one number off.

“It was a very difficult puzzle and you really had to do your homework to solve it,” said White.

White added that both Gibb and himself were pleased that people got to learn about history while taking part in their treasure hunt.

Gibb joked that White originally thought the treasure hunt was too easy and that it would be solved in the first week. After White tweaked the clues, it took six years for the treasure hunt to be solved.

For more information on “In Pursuit of the Golden Key,” visit www.whitegibberish.com. For more information on the Gibson Gallery, visit www.gibsonartgallery.com or call 519-736-2826.

“Student Pix” on exhibit at Gibson Gallery through June 3

 

The Gibson Art Gallery has hung young photographers’ work on its walls for the 13th time.

The annual Student Pix exhibit features the work of both primary and secondary school students from within the Greater Essex County District School Board.

Professional photographers and artists judge the photos and assign winners.  Winners are broken into categories according to grade level and photographic medium.

“It’s an exhibit the public looks forward to,” said Bonnie Deslippe, the gallery’s administrator.  “People like to see what these kids have created.”

Deslippe noted that this year is an interesting one, since one of the “Best in Show” awards was granted to a grade schooler.  Addison Slater, a Kingsville Public School student, won for her digitally-enhanced image.  Normally, she said, the winner comes from the senior division, which includes grades 9-12.

This year, around 250 photos were submitted.  Of them, 37 winners were announced:

 

PRIMARY – Black and White

Kate Winney

Sebastien Allison

Ava Soucie

 

PRIMARY – Colour

Kate Winney

Sebastien Allison

Ava Soucie

 

PRIMARY – Digitally Enhanced

Sebastien Allison

Dale Richardson explores the 13th annual Student Pix exhibit at the Gibson Art Gallery in Amherstburg. The exhibit will run through June 3. (Photo by Jonathan Martin)

JUNIOR – Black and White

Isabelle Soucie

Elliana O’Neill

Brianna Gignac

 

JUNIOR – Colour

Meredith Reynolds

Claire Bolton

Isabelle Soucie

 

JUNIOR – Digitally Enhanced

Minji Kim

Claire Stockwell

Claire Bolton

 

INTERMEDIATE – Black and White

Marin Van Wagner

Parker Mosey

Julia Balkwill

 

JUNIOR – Colour

Nefertari Powell

Mila Vasquez

Grace Rivett

 

JUNIOR – Digitally Enhanced

Aleksandra Milic

Morgan Churchill

Ava Claridge

 

SENIOR – Black and White

Ashley Injic

Julia Sanders

Dilinaer Aiyireti

 

SENIOR – Colour

Sydney Cremasco

Chyenne Wilson

Celina Duguay

Sommer Franz

 

SENIOR – Digitally Enhanced

Mariffe Boycott

Kevin Baker

Joslyn Gagnier

 

BEST IN SHOW – Black and White

Alyssa Ferrera

 

BEST IN SHOW – Colour

Sommer Franz

 

BEST IN SHOW – Digitally Enhanced

Addison Slater

 

The exhibit will continue hanging until June 3, when a closing reception will be held from 2-4 p.m.  The students will be formally presented with their awards at 3 p.m.

The Gibson Art Gallery is open from Thursday-Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

“Artists of the Future” shine at Gibson Gallery

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

About 100 students from St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School and General Amherst High School had an opportunity to show their art work at the Gibson Gallery the last several weeks.

The “Artists of the Future” exhibit closed Sunday with a reception where artists and their teachers stopped by to look at the exhibit.

“It’s a nice ray of sunshine on a cloudy day to see so many people come out to see the art,” said Lisa Bastien, one of two Villanova art teachers that turned out.

Bastien said about 70 students from Villanova participated. She picked out various works from first semester art students and came up with a variety of work to submit, though noted there wasn’t a competition. The students created acrylic paintings, water colours, sculptures, mixed media and more.

Jessica Dass, a Grade 10 student at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School, stands with her work that was part of the Artists of the Future exhibit.

Many of the students came up with their own original ideas, she said.

“The students were encouraged to problem solve in creative ways,” Bastien noted.

The art program is thriving at Villanova, she continued.

“We have about 150-200 students going through the art program every year,” said Bastien. “The arts are alive and well at Villanova.”

Pam Burke, the second Villanova art teacher in attendance, said she was impressed to see the quality of work in the exhibit. She said it was fun for the students to be part of the “Artists of the Future” exhibit.

Burke said she was at the gallery a few days earlier and overheard people talking about some of the works.

“It makes you feel a sense of pride,” she said.

Some students enter high school stating they are unable to draw, but Burke added she sees the skill level in them. There were those with work in the show who previously believed they couldn’t draw at all.

“For me, it’s trying to get them confident in their skill level,” she said.

Sophia Fallea, a Grade 12 student at Villanova, shows her work during the recent Artists of the Future exhibit.

Andrea Craig-Wammes, art teacher at General Amherst, said there were about 25-30 of her students involved. She said she teaches 70 students this semester and had 120 last semester.

General Amherst students submitted everything from drawings and photography to sculptures and paintings. Craig-Wammes said she likes to keep art interesting for the students and makes choosing what gets into the exhibit part of the curriculum.

“It’s very important,” she added, of seeing the works on exhibit. “They absolutely love it.”

Craig-Wammes added she brought students to the gallery recently on a field trip so they could see the exhibit and experience the ambience of the gallery.

“We’re just thankful to be part of the show,” she said. “We’re just excited. Amherst keeps growing and a lot of kids are involved in the arts.”

The current exhibit at the Gibson Gallery is “Flashback: Threadworks 2016.”  It runs through May 13. The gallery is located at 140 Richmond St. in Amherstburg.

Local artist crosses off item on her “bucket list” with her first exhibit

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The work of Sandra Menard is on exhibit at the Gibson Gallery through March 25 and those interested in seeing her work had better get in there between now and that date.

“This is the one and only time I am going to do this,” the Amherstburg resident said of exhibiting her work. “It was on my bucket list.”

Menard estimates there are about 45 paintings on exhibit with the work encapsulating about six decades of work. One painting included in her exhibit – entitled “Some Beauty I’ve Seen on my Way” – was created almost 63 years ago.

“My son was born in 1955 and I painted it that year,” said Menard during an opening reception.

Noting she works mainly in oils, Menard has painted some watercolours over the years. Much of her work is landscapes but there are wildlife paintings and other subject matter included as well.

“It’s just whatever catches my eye,” she said. “I do like landscapes.”

Sandra Menard is presenting her first-ever exhibit “Some Beauty I’ve Seen on my Way” now until March 25.

Some of the paintings originate from a vacation she took with her daughter, with her daughter taking photos and Menard painting from them. She also is a regular painter at a Thursday art group in her apartment building.

“I love playing with colours,” she said.

Menard has given away many paintings over the years, joking she had to retrieve some of them so she could have the exhibit. She does have some of her work for sale as part of the exhibit.

“I hope everyone will come out and have a look,” she said, adding she plans on coming to the gallery once per week during the time the exhibit is displayed.

This is the first exhibit at the Gibson Gallery in the 2018 season. The gallery is open Thursday-Saturday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

For further information, call 519-736-2826 and or visit their website at www.gibsonartgallery.com. Their Twitter account can be found at www.twitter.com/ARTamherstburg while their Facebook account is found at www.facebook.com/GibsonGallery.