fundraiser

Second Chance Animal Rescue asking community for support with unique event

 

 

By Jolene Perron


A local rescue is working with a local distillery to put a new spin on fundraising dinners.

“We have heard that the food at Wolfhead Distillery is like taking a traditional pasta dinner and elevating it to a much higher level,” explained Julie Bortolotti from Second Chance Animal Rescue. “We are having roasted rosemary chicken, penne in vegetarian sauce, salad tossed in Wolfhead Vodka Dressing and rolls with butter. By request, a Vegan/Vegetarian option will be available.”

Bortolotti explained they have two fundraising dinner events per year, which gives them an opportunity to celebrate all of their accomplishments and chance to get together with other supports to thank them for their contributions towards helping the animals.

“Animals hold a soft spot in my heart and that is the main reason why we agreed to do this fundraiser,” explained Sue Manherz, co-owner of Wolfhead Distillery. “We recently started fostering animals and ended up keeping our second foster dog. Second Chance Animal Rescue does a fantastic job helping and re-homing so many animals that I am happy to help them out. I wish there were more organizations like them.”

While they won’t be able to have any animals at the location, they will have a PowerPoint presentation with photos of adoptables and of animals that have been adopted out. Additionally, they will have our binder of animals available for viewing.

Second Chance Animal Rescue is holding a fundraiser dinner at Wolfhead Distillery on Howard. The proceeds will go towards helping meet the needs of animals like Tessa, until they find their fur-ever homes.

Second Chance Animal Rescue is holding a fundraiser dinner at Wolfhead Distillery on Howard. The proceeds will go towards helping meet the needs of animals like Tessa, until they find their fur-ever homes.

“The unfortunate situation is that there are already so many unwanted animals all over the world and a rescue can only save so many,” said Bortolotti. “That is why we encourage people to consider opening their hearts and their homes to the ones that find themselves without a loving place to lay their heads at night. We also promote spaying and neutering to help curb the overpopulation of unwanted animals who can – and many do – live life on the streets, scrounging and fighting to survive.”

The funds raised from this event will be directed towards veterinary care for the rescued animals. Bortolotti said every animal that makes their way to Second Chance Animal Rescue is provided with flea treatment, deworming, up-to-date vaccines, spay/neuter and microchip. The costs of veterinary care far exceed what they raise through adoption fees alone so it is imperative that they come up with creative, new and fun ways to raise the money to pay for these expenses. Periodically, Bortolotti explained, when they run into unexpected medical issues with animals, they also create GoFundMe Campaigns to quickly raise the funds for these unexpected needs.

“Many of the dogs that have come through our rescue have found themselves dumped in high kill shelters because they were no longer wanted by their families,” explained Bortolotti. “We also – when space permits – accept animals (both dogs and cats) that are surrendered by their owners and, periodically we are able to help tiny kittens that caring people pick up from the streets. In each instance, we carefully review the circumstances and ensure that every animal that becomes part of Second Chance Animal Rescue, is healthy before they are made available for adoption.”

The Dinner at the Distillery will be August 24th at 6 p.m. Tickets are $40 each, and are available by e-mailing scarescue.julie@outlook.com.

Second Chance Animal Rescue will also be holding a silent auction, and is planning a few other surprises for the evening.

“I’m looking forward to the event, although I am so busy running around that I never get an opportunity to enjoy the food,” said Bortolotti. “The venue is amazing and the staff at Wolfhead Distillery are very accommodating.”

Manherz explained this is only their second fundraiser, since they don’t have a special private room and have to shut down for the public. However, she said being able to help in any way is always a great feeling.

“I know its not one person that can do everything – it takes a team,” said Manherz. “And every little bit helps and if I can’t donate my time right now at least we can be here to help support by offering our services and establishment to fund raise for a wonder cause.”

LCBO inviting the public to “Pick Your Poison” in the name of charity

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Amherstburg LCBO is holding a fundraiser this Friday in an effort to help the United Way Windsor-Essex County.

“We are going to have on Aug. 4 what we are calling ‘Pick Your Poison’,” explained Marylyn Bartlett, manager of the Amherstburg LCBO store. “Because the LCBO gives a lot to the community, we’d like to get the community involved.”

Bartlett said they want to get local residents involved in the fun, adding she has found Amherstburg residents like to give back to local causes within the town. Staff will either come in before their shift, stay after their shift or come in on their day off to participate. People will have a choice on how they can “punish” them, as they will stand under “prison cell” decorations. Choices include five water balloons to throw at the staff member for $5, $2 to shoot silly string at a staff member, $5 for a staff member to eat a jalapeno or $10 for a pie in the face.

Marylyn Bartlett and Elaine Marton from the Amherstburg LCBO store hold up posters and promotional materal inviting the public to help them raise money for United Way. A fundraiser is coming to the local LCBO store this Friday.

Marylyn Bartlett and Elaine Marton from the Amherstburg LCBO store hold up posters and promotional materal inviting the public to help them raise money for United Way. A fundraiser is coming to the local LCBO store this Friday.

All proceeds go to United Way Windsor-Essex County.

The fundraiser runs from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. with some special guests coming in as well, with the LCBO district manager due in at 11 a.m. and Mayor Aldo DiCarlo around 4:30 p.m.

“We’re asking people to bring the family out, have some fun with us and help out United Way,” said Bartlett.

Bartlett said they learned proceeds from events held last year at the Amherstburg store helped give boxed lunches to youth in need. This year, money will help other programs, including after-school programs for at risk youth and those needing extra counseling.

“This year, we decided to step it up a notch and have some fun with it,” she said.

The LCBO’s Amherstburg location is at 495 Sandwich St. S.

Fundraiser for family of Adam Pouget being held Friday night

 

The fundraiser for the family of Adam Pouget is fast approaching.

The event, being presented by Liuna 625, is entitled “Adam’s Eve” and is being presented Friday night in the Libro Centre’s indoor soccer arena. It benefits Pouget’s wife Ashley Dupuis and their children. Pouget was killed after being struck by a vehicle Nov. 17 as he was either walking or skateboarding to work along Simcoe St. between Meloche Road and Concession 4 South.

The event runs between 7-11 p.m.

adams-eve-799x400

Live music will be performed by Jody Raffoul. There will also be hors d’oeuvres and beverages served Friday night.

A silent auction will also be presented in order to raise funds for the family.

There is also a GoFundMe page set up where people can make online donations. It can be found at www.gofundme.com/adams-eve.

Tickets for the “Adam’s Eve” fundraiser are $10 per person and will be available at the door Friday night.

Western Secondary’s “Pumpkinfest” a hit again this year

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

A tradition over three decades old continued last weekend at Western Secondary School and it appears to have been a hit once again.

Western’s annual “Pumpkinfest” was held with a packed house of vendors, artists and the general public turning out. Samantha Thomas, a teacher at Western Secondary, said the event started long before she began teaching at the school 22 years ago.

This year’s event went “really well,” she stated.

Andrew Wiebe stands with some of his artwork that he had for sale on the weekend at Western Secondary School. Wiebe was one of 110 vendors that participated at Western’s annual “Pumpkinfest” fundraiser. Proceeds benefit student activities at the school.

Andrew Wiebe stands with some of his artwork that he had for sale on the weekend at Western Secondary School. Wiebe was one of 110 vendors that participated at Western’s annual “Pumpkinfest” fundraiser. Proceeds benefit student activities at the school.

“We are full of vendors and it looks like full of customers as well,” said Thomas, during the two-day event.

Pumpkinfest started out as an auction, she said, and evolved into a craft show. A total of 110 vendors participated both Saturday and Sunday and Thomas added there is a waiting list of vendors wanting to get in next year.

“It’s our biggest fundraiser. All the proceeds go towards student activities,” said Thomas.

The event typically raises about $7,000 from the vendors but booths run by different departments generate additional revenue, she added.

“Every department is making money,” said Thomas.

The majority of students helped in some way, she added, whether it be in one of the booths, selling their own artwork, volunteering to collect canned goods, directing traffic in the parking lot, setting up tables or performing another necessary project to ensure the event ran smoothly.

Lexie Fraser and Nathan Bezaire sell coffee and treats during Pumpkinfest at Western Secondary School.

Lexie Fraser and Nathan Bezaire sell coffee and treats during Pumpkinfest at Western Secondary School.

“They see the school in a different light. That’s the part I like,” said Thomas.

Andrew Wiebe was one of the students that participated as he was selling some of the paintings he has created over the years. Wiebe, 16, estimated he sold about a dozen paintings. He has been painting since he was seven-years-old.

“It’s relaxing, it’s fun,” said Wiebe. “If there is a picture I like, I’ll paint it.”

Other Western students were busy collecting cans and donations for area food banks, as well as their school. Two of those students included Duncan Phelps and Hailey Hunter with Phelps working at his fifth Pumpkinfest and Hunter at her first.

“It’s packed,” said Hunter, of the amount of people that came into the school.

Phelps said that while the cans will go to food banks, monetary donations assist the school’s adaptive and food programs.

Duncan Phelps and Hailey Hunter collected  donations near the entrance to Pumpkinfest.

Duncan Phelps and Hailey Hunter collected
donations near the entrance to Pumpkinfest.

Both Phelps and Hunter said they liked the social aspect of the event as well, with Phelps stating he gets to reconnect with people.

“I like it because I can say hello to a lot of people,” he said.

“You can see a lot of people you haven’t seen for a while,” added Hunter, adding it is a good way to get volunteer hours towards graduation as well.

One of the vendors from the community was Kelly O’Rourke, who brought her work from her “Lake Bottom Art” creations.

“I’ve never been here before so it’s neat to be here,” said O’Rourke.

The gymnasium (pictured) and hallways at Western Secondary School were busy Oct. 29-30 as the school's annual Pumpkinfest was held.

The gymnasium (pictured) and hallways at Western Secondary School were busy Oct. 29-30 as the school’s annual Pumpkinfest was held.

It was only the third show for O’Rourke, with Art by the River being her first. She heard good things about Pumpkinfest so she decided to contact Western Secondary and go to the school.

“It’s great cause as well,” she said.

Lake Bottom Art is new, O’Rourke added, “but it’s a lot of fun. You collect all the glass and all of the stones and then you have to come up with a design.”

2nd Amherstburg Scouting holding “Apple Day” this Saturday

 

Be prepared to see the 2nd Amherstburg Beavers, Cubs and Scouts out and around town with baskets full of juicy red apples this Saturday!

The boys and girls will brave the cold and chilly temperatures (or spring-like and balmy) accepting donations for freshly picked apples.

Beavers, Cubs and Scouts from 2nd Amherstburg Scouting will be at local retailers this Saturday for Apple Day. The group were out at Wagner’s Orchards in Lakeshore picking the apples last week.

Beavers, Cubs and Scouts from 2nd Amherstburg Scouting will be at local retailers this Saturday for Apple Day. The group were out at Wagner’s Orchards in Lakeshore picking the apples last week.

The beavers and cubs were out at Wagner’s Orchards in Lakeshore last Tuesday climbing ladders and picking apples just for Apple Day! Everyone had a great time and ended the day with apple cider and cookies. A special thank you to Wagner’s Orchards for donating all of the apples.

On Saturday the kids will be out at some of our local stores including Sobeys, No Frills, Dollarama, TD Bank, Canadian Tire, Shoppers Drug Mart, and Wigle’s Gourmet Meats and Deli. Thank you for letting us stay in front of your stores! I know it will be really hard to resist their smiling faces as they ask, “Would you like a sweet delicious apple?”

Thank you to everyone for considering a donation! 100% of the money stays local with 2nd Amherstburg Scouting and helps to offset the cost of camp, crafts, equipment, sporting goods, etc. We look forward to seeing you out in the community! Hopefully you will see us running around during the River Lights Festival, caroling for seniors, collecting canned goods, and cleaning up our community parks.

We are also wrapping up our Scouts Canada Popcorn drive. For those of you who are interested in a great Christmas present idea or even a little self indulgence please email 2ndamherstburgscouting@gmail.com for more information or to place an order.

We are looking forward to seeing you on Saturday!

2nd Amherstburg has had an active scouting group since 1928 and is the second oldest group in Essex County. This year Amherstburg Scouting has a Beaver Colony (boys and girls ages 5-7), a Cub Pack (boys and girls ages 8-10), and a Scout Troop (boys and girls ages 11-14).