Canadian Cancer Society

Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic presents $50,000 cheque to Canadian Cancer Society

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic has given a big boost to the fight against breast cancer.

The July 13 golf tournament was held at Pointe West Golf Club and raised $50,000 for breast cancer. The official cheque presentation was held Thursday at Amherstburg Buick GMC, as the dealership helped sponsor the tournament and dealer principal Scott Elliott was one of the organizers.

“It’s great,” Jovanovski said of the final total. “I think coming into it, we didn’t know what to expect. With the support from the community, friends and partners we developed, we were able to raise $50,000 for breast cancer research. We are thrilled about that.”

Organizers and volunteers had a number in mind, the former NHL defenseman said, but exceeded it.

The official cheque presentation from July's Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic took place Aug. 10 at Amherstburg Buick GMC. From left: committee member Andrea Sikora, Ed Jovanovski, Canadian Cancer Society's volunteer engagement co-ordinator Theresa Blondin and dealer principal Scott Elliott.

The official cheque presentation from July’s Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic took place Aug. 10 at Amherstburg Buick GMC. From left: committee member Andrea Sikora, Ed Jovanovski, Canadian Cancer Society’s volunteer engagement co-ordinator Theresa Blondin and dealer principal Scott Elliott.

“People are generous,” he said, adding that people are great to support causes like breast cancer research or causes relating to any other kind of illness.

“The feedback was great. We think (the tournament) went well,” he said. “We’re definitely excited.”

Jovanovski has a personal connection to breast cancer, as his mother had stage two breast cancer and is in her second year of remission. His brother Deni played an important role in organizing the tournament as well, he added.

Plans for next year’s tournament are already underway, with the second annual tournament planned for Pointe West July 20, 2018. Elliott said people will be able to get details soon at www.jovogolfclassic.com.

Elliott was also thrilled with the overall total.

“I think it’s fantastic,” he said. “It goes to a great cause.”

Theresa Blondin, volunteer engagement co-ordinator with the Canadian Cancer Society, said breast cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in women, with 88 per cent of women surviving the disease. That said, there is still more work to be done with a cure being the main goal.

“We are overwhelmed with the amount of support,” she said, regarding the $50,000 donation.

As the money goes towards research, Blondin acknowledged that research has helped lead to early detection and that has resulted in the 88 per cent survival rate.

“Screening can save your life,” she said.

Villanova students raise big bucks in fight against cancer

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Students at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School led the way in the fight against cancer last Friday.

The Catholic high school held a Relay for Life event on and inside of the school’s track with early estimates on fundraising totals exceeding $38,500, with more expected.

The organizing committee for last Friday’s Relay for Life event at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School pose for a group photo. Top row (from left): teacher Mark Strong, Elizabeth Sauve, Meaghan Frank, Alanna Sauve, Madison Laramie, Emily MacKinnon and teacher Ellen Nolan. Bottom row (from left): Rachel Levang, Connor Sloan, Johnny Rosati, Jordan Gaudette and Morgan Keys. The event raised $38,500 at press time with more expected.

The organizing committee for last Friday’s Relay for Life event at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School pose for a group photo. Top row (from left): teacher Mark Strong, Elizabeth Sauve, Meaghan Frank, Alanna Sauve, Madison Laramie, Emily MacKinnon and teacher Ellen Nolan. Bottom row (from left): Rachel Levang, Connor Sloan, Johnny Rosati, Jordan Gaudette and Morgan Keys. The event raised $38,500 at press time with more expected.

Alanna Sauve, one of the organizers of Friday’s event, said Villanova has a “youth troop” set up that works with the Canadian Cancer Society.

“We build awareness and fundraise,” said Sauve.

Relay for Life teams do laps of the track at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School last Friday. There were roughly 250 student volunteers from the school involved with the event.

Relay for Life teams do laps of the track at St. Thomas of Villanova Secondary School last Friday. There were roughly 250 student volunteers from the school involved with the event.

The “youth troop” worked with the committee that Sauve established to run the Relay for Life, which lasted from 12-11 p.m. It featured teams of students as well as about ten cancer survivors doing laps of the track, games, therapy dogs, music from Villanova students and a concert by The Autumn Kings. A number of teams were part of the event with several in different coloured T-shirts seen walking the Villanova track.

A “luminary ceremony” was held during the evening.

“Unfortunately, everyone has been affected by cancer somehow,” said Sauve. “(The Relay for Life event) has been a great learning experience and we’re having some fun as well.”

Josie Sleiman performs a song as part of the entertainment that was offered during last Friday’s Relay for Life event at Villanova.

Josie Sleiman performs a song as part of the entertainment that was offered during last Friday’s Relay for Life event at Villanova.

Sauve, a Grade 12 student, said all organizational efforts were performed by Villanova students. In all, roughly 250 people volunteered for the event.

“It’s a win-win for our students at Villanova and our partners at the Canadian Cancer Society,” she said.

It was the first time Villanova hosted a Relay for Life event, Sauve added.

“It’s been a pretty good success so far,” she said.

The Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic coming to Pointe West July 13

 

By Jonathan Martin

National Hockey League (NHL) all-star and Olympic gold medal winner Ed Jovanovski is trading in his hockey stick for a golf club in the name of charity.

The Windsor native and former NHL defenseman met with press last Tuesday at Pointe West Golf Club to announce his partnership with Amherstburg Chevrolet Buick GMC in the development of a new golf tournament.

The Ed Jovanovski Charity Golf Classic will raise funds for the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) to support its breast cancer research. Jovanovski said he knows firsthand what the disease can do.

NHL all-star and Olympic gold medalist Ed Jovanovski scrums with the press at Pointe West Golf Club Tuesday, April 18.  Jovanovski announced his partnership with Amherstburg Chevrolet Buick GMC to bring about the first annual Ed Jovanovski charity golf tournament.

NHL all-star and Olympic gold medalist Ed Jovanovski scrums with the press at Pointe West Golf Club Tuesday, April 18. Jovanovski announced his partnership with Amherstburg Chevrolet Buick GMC to bring about the first annual Ed Jovanovski charity golf tournament. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

“A couple years ago my mother went through a pretty good battle with breast cancer,” he said. “We’re grateful for anything we can do to further (CCS research) along.”

Jovanovski said his mother is doing well, though her time in the hospital was difficult for his whole family. Now that she’s doing better, he said the timing seems right.

“It has always been a dream of mine to hold a golf tournament,” he said. “Obviously, growing up (around here), this area is very important to me.”

According to Scott Elliott, dealer principal for Amherstburg Chevrolet Buick GMC, the tournament, which is set to be held at Pointe West Golf Club, will include a deli-style luncheon, hole-in-one prizes, a putting contest, auctions and dinner.

Jovanovski said he’s doing his best to convince as many of his NHL friends as possible to stop by. He did warn them, though, that no matter who shows up, he will be the best player on the green.

The tournament will be held July 13.

General Amherst’s Pink Day a big success

General Amherst High School’s Pink Day raised $400 for the Canadian Cancer Society. From left: Kelly O'Rourke,  Felicia Varacalli, Keely Gibb, Maria Lederer, Megan Farmer, Dani Leroux, Darby Roland.

General Amherst High School’s Pink Day raised $400 for the Canadian Cancer Society. From left: Kelly O’Rourke, Felicia Varacalli, Keely Gibb, Maria Lederer, Megan Farmer, Dani Leroux, Darby Roland.

By Aaron Wharram

General Amherst High School managed to hold another successful event by raising money for breast cancer research.

The school, in just two hours, raised an incredible $400 Oct. 16. Kelly O’Rourke, community fundraising specialist with the Canadian Cancer Society, visited the school Oct. 27 and accepted of all the money donated from the students of General Amherst. O’Rourke said she was honored that the students of General Amherst managed to raised such a large donation in just a short time span.

Student council prime minister Dani Leroux says that this will not be the last event of the school year where General Amherst will raise money for Cancer Awareness. “We plan on doing an event in December and another one in April,” says Leroux. “We really want to see how much this school can raise in one year, and we think we can raise a lot.”

General Amherst succeeded in winning the Daffodil Award and plan on doing it again.

Raise $1,500, have a teacher smooch a cow

 

General Amherst teacher Michael Digou kisses a cow held by Kenzie Wright after Digou was selected in a contest. The contest was part of a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society.

General Amherst teacher Michael Digou kisses a cow held by Kenzie Wright after Digou was selected in a contest. The contest was part of a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society.

By Ron Giofu

 

How do you get an English teacher to kiss a cow?

Answer – raise $1,500 for the Canadian Cancer Society.

Students at General Amherst High School raised the money during a month-long drive that ended last Thursday morning with teacher Michael Digou puckering up and planting a smooch on a cow owned by the family of student Kenzie Wright.

Sam Gaudette, a student in teacher Greg Scott’s leadership class, said the class was charged with running a daffodil campaign for the Canadian Cancer Society. She took on the project and made changes to where a teacher – which turned out to be Digou –  had to kiss the cow.

“Our school is very excited for this,” said Gaudette.

Taking on the fundraiser had a very personal connection for Gaudette.

“This is really close to my heart,” she said. “My dad has cancer and he is going to have a bone marrow transplant next week.”

That has made her even more aware of the need for cancer research and the importance of raising money for the Canadian Cancer Society.

Canadian Cancer Society volunteer Sue White (far left) accepts a $1,500 donation from event organizer Sam Gaudette and Gaudette's friends Kenzie Wright and Madi Vandenham. Gaudette organized a "Kiss a Cow" fundraiser with help from her leadership class to aid the Canadian Cancer Society.

Canadian Cancer Society volunteer Sue White (far left) accepts a $1,500 donation from event organizer Sam Gaudette and Gaudette’s friends Kenzie Wright and Madi Vandenham. Gaudette organized a “Kiss a Cow” fundraiser with help from her leadership class to aid the Canadian Cancer Society.

Gaudette added she was able to create awareness of the fundraiser at an assembly and it helped further the cause.

“We’ve been in the cafeteria collecting money all month,” said Gaudette. “I’m really happy (with the $1,500 total).”

Sue White, a local volunteer with the Canadian Cancer Society, said fundraisers like that may be more common than she realizes but it was a first for her.

“I do a number of things with the cancer society,” she said. “This is the first time I’ve been at an event were someone kisses something of this size.”

White said it was “quite fun” for her to be at the event and noted it was quite fun for the school as well.