Canada 150

Mural installed at River Canard general store to celebrate Canada 150

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The River Canard Canoeing Company has joined in on Canada 150 festivities, with their most recent contribution being a mural installed at the River Canard Outpost General Store.

Owner Ron Lapointe had a mural commissioned for the store, located at the corner of Malden Road and County Road 8, with the work being completed by local artist Jacqueline Raulin. It is a permanent installation and is found near the store’s main entrance.

“I always wanted to do something like this and Canada 150 seemed like a good time,” said Lapointe. “This was thought of even before Canada 150.”

The mural was completed without any sort of grant funding, Lapointe pointed out, with it featuring a map of “downtown River Canard.” It features the history of the area, depicts the two churches (original and current), wildlife known in the region, and historical figures and moments including General Brock, Chief Tecumseh, the skirmishes that came at the start of the War of 1812 and other features.

River Canard Outpost general store owner Ron Lapointe and artist Jacqueline Raulin stand with the newly installed mural that Raulin painted for the business. Lapointe said he had it commissioned for Canada 150 and had no grant funding to help him pay for it.

River Canard Outpost general store owner Ron Lapointe and artist Jacqueline Raulin stand with the newly installed mural that Raulin painted for the business. Lapointe said he had it commissioned for Canada 150 and had no grant funding to help him pay for it. (Submitted photo)

“The feedback has been great,” said Lapointe.”We’ve got a bit of everything. We’re quite proud of it.”

The mural took about three months in the studio to complete before it was mounted to the exterior wall of the roughly 80-year-old building.

“I think it’s great for the community,” he said.

Lapointe said the River Canard Canoeing Company works with the town and other groups such as cadets, schools and other clubs. He also recently hosted a Canada 150 event that was co-ordinated by the Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA).

More than 200 paddlers celebrated Canada 150 by paddling on the Detroit River and its tributaries, including the Canard River with ERCA stating it was part of a national initiative to celebrate our Heritage Rivers.

That event was held recently in partnership with local canoe and kayak organizations Paddle Anywhere, Windsor Adventure Inc. and River Canard Canoe Company, events were be held on the Little River, Detroit River, River Canard and Turkey Creek to celebrate Canada’s 150th and the cultural heritage, natural heritage and recreational values of this Canadian Heritage River.

Visitors to the River Canard Canoe Company paddle on the Canard River during a recent Canada 150 event presented in conjunction with ERCA.

Visitors to the River Canard Canoe Company paddle on the Canard River during a recent Canada 150 event presented in conjunction with ERCA.

“We’re trying to get people on the water and engaged with the Detroit River and the tributaries,” said ERCA staff member Laura Monforton, during the recent visit.

Monforton said people were able to learn about the Canard River from Lapointe and his staff and see the river from a different perspective.

“They got to go for a paddle and experience River Canard first-hand and learn why it is important for the environment,” she said.

The Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS)is Canada’s national river conservation program. Established in 1984, the CHRS gives national recognition to Canada’s outstanding rivers and encourages their long-term management to conserve their natural, cultural and recreational values for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians, now and in the future.

There are currently 42 Canadian Heritage Rivers across the country, Monforton pointed out. They total close to 12,000 kilometres.

The Detroit River was designated as a Canadian Heritage River in 2001, and is the only river in North America with both Canadian and American Heritage River designations.

 

Essex County celebrates Canada 150 by burying time capsule, dunking politicians

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The County of Essex celebrated Canada 150 last Friday and hopes that people 100 years from now will remember what 2017 was like.

An outdoor celebration took place at the Essex Civic Centre with one of the main attractions being the burying of a time capsule that isn’t supposed to be opened for another 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

The event was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

County CAO Brian Gregg said in addition to it being Canada 150, it is also the 225th anniversary of the formation of Essex County. When it is opened, the county will be celebrating its 325th anniversary, he noted.

“The contents of this capsule features artifacts from all seven of the county’s municipalities,” Gregg pointed out.

Gregg said the capsule was buried on the grounds of the civic centre under a “symbolic maple tree” and will give a “snapshot” of the past when it is eventually opened. Gregg, who is retiring later this year, said he has spent over 30 years with the County of Essex and has seen it grow.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

“I can only imagine what is in store for the next 100 years,” he said.

Warden Tom Bain said the Canada 150 event was “about honouring our history, relishing our present and looking forward to our future.”

Bain, who would later be one of the politicians and administration members to get wet in the dunk tank, also pointed out the 225th anniversary for the county. Bain stated Essex County has a rich history as he said it was the first county in Ontario to be formed prior to Confederation and the road that is now County Road 20 was the first road to be laid out in Ontario.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

A number of children attended the Canada 150 celebration and the warden told them to learn from both successes and failures.

“Do not forget the words collaboration, communication, kindness, and my favourite word, teamwork,” said Bain.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

The event also featured children’s activities, the formation of county officials into a human Canada 150 logo, a barbecue and the appearance of the Memorial Cup, the junior hockey trophy captured by the Windsor Spitfires.

St. Peter’s ACHS students visit first PM’s final resting place

 

 

Special to the RTT

 

As part of Canada’s 150th Birthday St. Peter’s ACHS College School students visited Former Prime Minister Sir John A. MacDonald at his final resting place in Kingston, Ontario.

StPeters trip1WEB

St. Peter’s ACHS College School students began planning their trip through southern Ontario to help celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday well over a year ago. The five-day road trip included stop offs at St. Mary among the Huron’s and Martyr’s Shrine in Midland, The Peterborough Lift Locks, Fort Henry in Kingston, and a trek through the 1000 Islands with a stopover at Boldt Castle in the state of New York. The final stop however was in Kingston to visit the grave of Sir John A. MacDonald.

StPeters trip2

St. Peter’s students felt that it would be a great tribute to visit our Father of Confederation for Canada’s 150th Birthday. Once there however, students were a bit disappointed seeing a simple grave marker for the man who helped shape and build this great country.

(Photos provided by St. Peter's ACHS College School)

(Photos provided by St. Peter’s ACHS College School)

The drive for this trip was extensive and the distance covered was humongous. The school group, which consisted of students, staff and parents, camped out every night with two nights being in the rain. They cooked their food on open fires and tried to live somewhat like the early explorers of Canada did well over 300-400 years ago.

Overall, the group was thrilled with their trip and is looking forward to their next great learning adventure.

 

General Amherst students repainting fire hydrants for Canada 150

 

 

By Danica Skakavac

 

In honour of Canada’s 150th anniversary, the Grade 12 art class at General Amherst is taking part in the opportunity of re-painting the fire hydrants stationed throughout the town.

Twelve fire hydrants in total were painted in the past with a pre-War of 1812 theme, many portraying soldiers. The art class will be taking on ten of these hydrants, due to the farther location of some hydrants. It is actually part of their classwork curriculum to take part in community involvement having to do with the arts and the hydrants happened to be a perfect fit.

Maddi Couvillon works on a fire hydrant along Dalhousie St. There are 12 downtown fire hydrants being worked on by the local high school students.

Maddi Couvillon works on a fire hydrant along Dalhousie St. There are 12 downtown fire hydrants being worked on by the local high school students.

Art teacher Andrea Craig-Wammes was approached by Amherstburg’s visitor information centre manager Jennifer Ibrahim, with Ibrahim suggesting that the art class be the ones this year to redecorate the fire hydrants that were painted a few years ago.

“It allows a sense of community as well as have artwork on display and gives a taste of the different mediums that it takes to produce something that’s going to be outdoors and sustain the elements for a good amount of time,” said Craig-Wammes. “I expect that the town will be thrilled because it is such a talented group of young artists and the ideas and designs have definitely surpassed what I envisioned.”

So far, the hydrants are coming along great and students have started to trace out their designs before painting them on. It is a long process but they are expected to turn out amazing in the end.

Fire Hydrants2

“It’s more difficult than any other project we’ve done,” said Olivia D’Alimonte, one of the participating students. “We’re really weather-dependent but it’s also really fun and really exciting.”

Another student, Mitchel Leblanc, added that, “I feel honoured and excited because I get to show my artwork to the entire town and it’s going to be there for a couple years. I get to show off what our school can do and how proud I am to be part of a great town.”

So, next time you’re taking a stroll through the downtown area, keep an eye out for some wonderfully painted fire hydrants.

Park House Museum to present exhibit highlighting women’s expanding role in Canada

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The Park House Museum is celebrating Canada 150 by looking a women’s roles over the past 150 years.

The Park House’s latest exhibit – “Her Story: 150 Years of Women in Canada – Fashion, Politics, and Gender Roles” – will open May 26, much earlier than anticipated as July 1 was the original target date. Curator Stephanie Pouget-Papak said this is an exhibit she has looked forward to presenting.

“We have a fabulous collection of clothing at the museum,” said Pouget-Papak. “It was a matter of finding a storyline for it.”

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, Pouget-Papak decided to “think outside the box” and examine the changing roles of women over the last 150 years. There are several portions to the exhibit, which people can walk and read through on the upper floor of the museum, with one being “Votes for Women.” That area talks about women’s roles in politics and elections with Pouget-Papak hoping to add a list of all women that served on town council.

There is also an area on women’s roles in wartime, with Pouget-Papak stating war helped become a “vehicle that moved women forward.” There is a “nursing sister” dress featured as part of that section.

The exhibit also looks at women’s roles in education, how they were educated for specific professions and their role in the labour force. While women were sent home from the factories after World War I, she said many stayed employed in factories after World War II and the exhibit includes a photo from the former Alymer Canning Factory.

Park House Museum curator Stephanie Pouget-Papak adjusts a dress on a mannequin in preparation for the museum’s new women’s exhibit.

Park House Museum curator Stephanie Pouget-Papak adjusts a dress on a mannequin in preparation for the museum’s new women’s exhibit.

Another component of the exhibit features the rise of consumerism, which Pouget-Papak said “exploded in the 20th Century.” There is another portion devoted to how film influenced fashion with another portion being for children. The children’s portion allows them to dress up and be themselves as Pouget-Papak stated, “it doesn’t matter what you look like, you are strong and beautiful.”

There will also be an opportunity to play “history detective” as questions will be posed that either can be answered in the story boards or by looking up the information.

The Park House Museum has an intern from the University of Windsor and that enabled the museum to get the exhibit open earlier. A preview reception will be held May 19 with a limited number of spots available. The preview reception costs $5 to attend and those interested in attending are asked to reserve their spot in advance.

“It’s like Christmas Day for me when an exhibit finally opens,” said Pouget-Papak.

Pouget-Papak added she has a five-year plan for programming with the 2018 exhibit to have an archaeological theme.

“Her Story: 150 Years of Women in Canada – Fashion, Politics, and Gender Roles” will run through Oct. 6. Operating hours are Monday-Friday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in May and June, seven days per week from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in July and August, with hours returning to 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday in September and October. Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors, $2.50 for children over four and children under four being free.

Pouget-Papak also stated she is working on a program geared to Grade 8 students on women’s roles for when school groups tour the museum.

The Park House is also hiring seven students as the museum has received grant funding to afford the hiring. Those interested can call the Park House Museum at 519-736-2511 or visit www.parkhousemuseum.com. Their Facebook page is www.facebook.com/ParkHouseAmherstburg and their Twitter address is @parkhousemuseum.