Bart DiPasquale

Local residents celebrate a century of living

 

By Jonathan Martin

In the early morning of April 9, 1917, 150,000 Canadian soldiers poured out of their trenches and shell holes into the snow-swept wasteland surrounding Vimy Ridge.

It was the first wave of what would become Canada’s most celebrated military achievement. It was also the day Herman Glonek was born in Poland, which, at the time, was split between German and Russian control.

The assault lasted four days. By the late afternoon of April 12, the four Canadian divisions making the advance had captured their objectives and pushed German forces back five kilometers. As if in celebration, Jean Farr entered the world in St. Thomas, Ontario that same day.

Ninety-nine years, 364 days later, on April 11, 2017, Glonek and Farr sat at a table together in Amherstburg. Both are living at Seasons Retirement Community. Though their home countries were at war when they were born, today they are friends, and hugged each other in mutual celebration. After all, a century of life is no small feat.

Some of the staff of Seasons Retirement Community surround Jean Farr (front, left) and Herman Glonek (front, right) as they celebrate their birthdays at Seasons in Amherstburg last Tuesday morning.  Glonek turned 100 April 9 and Farr turned 100 April 12.

Some of the staff of Seasons Retirement Community surround Jean Farr (front, left) and Herman Glonek (front, right) as they celebrate their birthdays at Seasons in Amherstburg last Tuesday morning. Glonek turned 100 April 9 and Farr turned 100 April 12. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

“My life was hard,” Glonek said in his sharply-accented English. “I struggled so.”

At 21, he joined the Polish army and soon found himself fighting against two of the era’s most influential military forces: Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. The invaders swept across Glonek’s home and swallowed the country whole in just over a month.

Along with millions of other Poles, Glonek was captured and taken to a forced-labour camp. He spent the rest of World War Two starved and struggling on a German farm.

“I have such stories from that time,” he said. “I often tell myself I will write a book.”

Following Poland’s liberation in 1945, Glanek bought his way into Canada.

“I hated the (second world) war,” said Farr. She was living in St. Thomas while Glonek was making his way to Canada. She remembers welcoming some veterans home and noting the stinging absence of others.

“I hope there’s never another one,” she added. “But who’s to know?”

Jean Farr stands behind her 100th birthday cake at Seasons Retirement Community last Tuesday.  Farr is the third person to celebrate a 100th birthday at Seasons as of April 12.  The first was Marie White, who turned 100 last year.

Jean Farr stands behind her 100th birthday cake at Seasons Retirement Community last Tuesday. Farr is the third person to celebrate a 100th birthday at Seasons as of April 12. The first was Marie White, who turned 100 last year. (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Farr moved around a little during her century of life, but always stayed in Ontario. She finally found her way into Essex County following the death of her husband, when she moved into Harrow with her niece. From Harrow, she made the jump into retirement living at Seasons.

“I have no words for these people who take care of me,” said Glonek, referring to the Seasons staff. “I give thanks to God that I am here.”

For Glonek, getting to where he is took some doing. The Polish native said he entered Canada with a contract. He would work on a farm near Montréal for one year. After that, he would be on his own. When the contract ended, he moved to Windsor.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale (right)  presents Herman Glonek with a framed certificate at Seasons Retirement Community last Tuesday.  The certificate reads, in part, "Congratulations & Best Wishes on the Occasion of Your 100th Birthday." (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale (right)
presents Herman Glonek with a framed certificate at Seasons Retirement Community last Tuesday. The certificate reads, in part, “Congratulations & Best Wishes on the Occasion of Your 100th Birthday.” (RTT Photo by Jonathan Martin)

Decades later, the two centenarians found themselves being handed a piece of cake with a large, blue “100” printed on its top after being addressed by Amherstburg deputy mayor Bart DiPasquale and Amherstburg chief of police Tim Berthiaume.

DiPasquale spoke to both Farr and Glonek individually before presenting each with a certificate declaring that the “Council of the Corporation of the Town of Amherstburg votes to extend Birthday Wishes” to them.

Berthiaume presented each with a commemorative coin, on which the town’s police logo is emblazoned.

“You get one every hundred years,” Berthiaume told them. “I guess you better start clearing space.”

Farr and Glonek laughed, then exchanged a look.

 

For more photos from that day, visit our Facebook album.

Town releases treasurer’s report detailing council and committee remuneration

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The town has released its treasurer’s report detailing council’s remuneration for 2016.

The report shows that Mayor Aldo DiCarlo earned total remuneration from the town of $29,564.14. That figure is a combination of his $26,872.68 salary as mayor, his communication allowance of $1,374.54, his per diem of $103.98, $500 for public receptions and $712.94 for travel and mileage.

DiCarlo also $7,665 for being a member of the Essex Power board of directors including a $4,000, $3,500 for meeting fees and $165 for travel and mileage. He also received a $1,200 honorarium for being on the Amherstburg Police Services Board.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale earned $19,971.62 from the town including his salary of $18,413.40. DiPasquale’s communication allowance as $1,339 while his public receptions remuneration was $45. A total of $174.22 was listed as DiPasquale’s travel and mileage expenses.

Councillor Leo Meloche had a total remuneration figure of $20,194.29. In addition to the $15,936.12 salary he earned as a councillor, other expenses and remuneration included $1,223.33 for his communication allowance, $830.81 for his per diem, $342.86 for public receptions, $1000.18 for training and conferences and $860.99 for travel and mileage.

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Councillor Joan Courtney’s total remuneration for 2016 was $19,015.16. Courtney’s communication allowance was $1,350.16 for 2016 while her per diem was $727.22. Training and conferences amounted to $890.40 for Courtney while her travel and mileage was $111.26. That remuneration was on top of her $15,936.12 salary.

Councillor Rick Fryer’s overall remuneration total was just slightly less than Courtney’s, coming in at $19,012.66. In addition to Fryer’s $15,936.12 salary, his communication allowance was $1,232.47 and his per diem was $830.81. Fryer’s training and conferences expenses were $843.64 while his travel and mileage remuneration amounted to $169.62. Fryer also received $650 on top of his remuneration from the town for being on the ERCA board of directors.

The total remuneration from the town for 2016 for Councillor Jason Lavigne was $18,957.07. The breakdown of that number included the $15,936.12 salary, his $1,393.83 communication allowance, $727.22 for his per diem and a travel and mileage expense of $111.26.

Lavigne also earned a $1,200 honorarium for being on the Amherstburg Police Services Board.

Councillor Diane Pouget’s remuneration for last year was $17,404. Her $15,936.12 salary was combined with a communication allowance of $1,268.06, a per diem of $103.59 and a training and conference total of $96.67.

Other Amherstburg Police Service Board members receiving a $1,200 honorarium were Pauline Gemmell, Bob Rozankovic and Patricia Simone.

A total of $4,350 in honorariums was paid to committee of adjustment members. Donald Shaw received an honorarium of $975 while Sherry Ducedre received $900. David Cozens, Michael Prue and Duncan Smith each received an honorarium of $825.

Accessibility committee honorariums included $100 for Kenneth Houston and $300 for William Whittal.

Ron Sutherland received $1,078 for being on the ERCA board and was also one of five drainage board members paid either for an honorarium or for a drainage course. The drainage board’s total amount for remuneration was $4,557.66 with other members including Gary Ayers, Robert Bezaire, Allan Major and Bob Pillon.

A total of $2,148 was paid to heritage committee members for their attendance at the Ontario Heritage Conference. Robert Honor received $1,073.52 while Paul Hertel received $1,074.64. Remuneration for economic advisory committee member John McDonald was $1,094.99 as he had attended the Think Smarter economic development forum.

Essex County releases 2016 remuneration report for county council members

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The County of Essex has released its 2016 remuneration report with one Amherstburg representative being near the middle of the pack while the other had the lowest remuneration total.

With the exception of the warden and deputy warden, who earn salaries of $64,958.16 and $10,919.88 respectively, each county council member earns a salary of $8,981.40. The difference in remuneration totals stem from what compensation is gained or repaid through indemnities, mileage, conference expenses or out-of-town meetings.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale ranked eighth out of the 14 county council members with a total remuneration of $13,286.66. In addition to his salary, DiPasquale’s indemnities and mileage amounted to $1,387.06 and $1,087.78 respectively with the remainder being a conference per diem of $640 and conference expense of $1,190.42.

Mayor Aldo DiCarlo’s remuneration total was actually the least of the 14 members of Essex County council, totaling $11,640.64. DiCarlo’s indemnities totaled $213.44 and his mileage amounted to $573.46. His conference per diem was $640 and his conference expenses were $1,232.34.

Warden Tom Bain had a total remuneration of $81,923.51 with indemnities totaling $747.04 and mileage of $5,515.52. Bain’s conference per diem was $2,240 while his conference expenses were $6,925.83. Bain, also the mayor of Lakeshore, had expenses for out-of-town meetings amount to $576.96 and his per diem for those out-of-town meetings total $960.

Essex Deputy Mayor Richard Meloche’s remuneration was second highest, totaling $17,365. In addition to his salary as a county councillor, Meloche’s indemnities totaled $5,516 and his mileage total was $467.56. His conference per diem was $640 while his conference expenses totaled $1,760.50.

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Kingsville Mayor Nelson Santos had a total of $15,228.33 paid out in remuneration in 2016. In addition to his salary, Santos’ indemnities totaled $2,294.48 and his mileage was $1,422.44. His conference per diem was $640 and his conference expenses were $1,890.01.

Essex Mayor Ron McDermott ranked fourth out of the 14 county council members with a remuneration total of $14,700.84. His indemnities were $2,025.48 and his mileage totaled $41.12. McDermott’s conference per diem was $800 and his conference expenses were $2,852.84.

Tecumseh Mayor Gary McNamara’s 2016 remuneration was $14,157.20 with indemnities of $4,802.40 and mileage of $373.40 being added to his salary. McNamara had no conference expenses listed.

Kingsville Deputy Mayor Gord Queen’s 2016 remuneration totaled $13,622.75. In addition to Queen’s salary, he had $2,347.84 listed as his indemnities and $589.56 in mileage. His conference per diem was $80 and his conference expenses were $1,223.95.

Lakeshore Deputy Mayor Al Fazio had a remuneration of $13,461.88. His indemnities totaled $320.16 in 2016 while his mileage was listed at $564.92. Fazio’s per diem for conferences was $800 while his conference expenses totaled $2,795.40.

While Fazio’s total ranked seventh, Leamington Deputy Mayor Hilda MacDonald’s 2016 remuneration total ranked ninth. In addition to MacDonald’s salary, her indemnities were $1,280.64 while her mileage totaled $534.28. MacDonald’s per diem for conferences were $640 and her conference expenses were $1,816.27.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya ranked tenth with a total remuneration of $12,838.90. Antaya, also the deputy warden, had indemnities of $1,387.36 and mileage of $531.66 in addition to his deputy warden’s salary. He had no conference per diem or expenses listed for 2016.

LaSalle Deputy Mayor Marc Bondy had his 2016 remuneration listed as $12,659.40. In addition to his salary as a county councillor, he had $1,387.36 in indemnities and $487.86 in mileage. Bondy’s per diem for conferences was $640 while his conference expenses totaled $1,162.78.

Tecumseh Deputy Mayor Joe Bachetti saw his 2016 remuneration listed at $12,643.95. Bachetti’s indemnities totaled $1,494.08 and his mileage was totaled at $441.92. Conference per diems was listed at $480 while Bachetti’s conference expenses were listed at $1,246.55.

The county council member with the second lowest remuneration total was Leamington Mayor John Paterson, whose 2016 total was reported as $11,904.49. In addition to his salary, Paterson did not have any indemnities listed and $507.19 in mileage claimed. Paterson’s per diem for conferences totaled $640 while his conference expenses were $1,775.90.

In all, the remuneration for all members of Essex County council totaled $258,686.60. Total remuneration for committee members and others totaled $17,913.19.

Town council agrees to hire consultant to guide police costing process

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Town council has agreed to hire MPM Consulting to help guide the joint police advisory committee through the police costing and/or police amalgamation process.

Council voted 5-2 – with Mayor Aldo DiCarlo, Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale and councillors Jason Lavigne, Joan Courtney and Leo Meloche in favour – to proceed with the hire.

Councillors Diane Pouget and Rick Fryer were opposed. Pouget said the cost of the hiring was being “kept secret” from the public and also voiced concern that Amherstburg Police Services Board and Amherstburg Police Association members on the committee were issuing “dire warnings” about the process and future public involvement in policing.

Lavigne, also the chair of the Amherstburg Police Services Board, explained that they are investigating amalgamations with such services as LaSalle and Windsor because a costing and takeover by another service like those two or the OPP would result in a loss of control by Amherstburg in the direction of its policing.

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Suggesting that people are trying to keep their seats on the board was a notion he didn’t agree with, noting he receives about $1,000 per year for his service on the APSB.

The town has to get an idea of what different policing models look like and MPM Consulting has the expertise to gather that information, Lavigne continued, adding he would rather go to the public later with a better understanding of what the future of policing would look like.

“We can’t put the cart before the horse,” he said. “We don’t know what it looks like.”

CAO John Miceli, who chairs the joint police advisory committee, said an amalgamation allows Amherstburg to talk about what policing they would like to see while accepting a costing and being taken over would see Amherstburg being told what kind of policing they would get.

“There’s a significant difference here,” said Miceli.

Miceli originally told council the consultant’s rates were in a private and confidential memo, but later stated that an average OPP costing is $35,000 to $50,000. He added the price for this consultation would likely be different due to the addition of the consultant considering the LaSalle and Windsor options.

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale believed that the town will “only get one kick at the can” at this process and said while going through it without a consultant may save money, mistakes would be made.

“I think going in without a consultant who has expertise is silly,” he said.

Councillor Joan Courtney said she didn’t feel confident in making a decision on a costing or amalgamation without help and that the consultant would provide that help.

“There’s too much information we don’t have,” said Courtney.

It was also learned that the town can expect an OPP costing within the next five months.

Town considering outdoor smoke-free bylaw

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Smokers, take note – your ability to light up on town property may become further restricted.

Town council has tabled a proposed outdoor smoke-free bylaw for consideration at the Dec. 12 meeting. Amherstburg is currently the only municipality in Essex County not to have such a bylaw with Essex, Kingsville, Lakeshore, LaSalle, Leamington and Tecumseh already having passed such legislation.

According to a report from manager of licensing and enforcement Nicole Rubli, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) approached the town about enacting an outdoor smoke-free bylaw.

The proposed bylaw would prohibit smoking in the town’s outdoor spaces which includes Amherstburg’s parks, recreational fields, playground areas, and trails.

Rubli’s report states that the bylaw further prohibits smoking within nine metres (approximately 29 feet 6 inches) of a public entrance or public exit of a municipal building.

No smoking signage is already up at the Libro Centre thanks to provincial legislation but town council is also considering another outdoor smoke-free bylaw to further protect people from second-hand smoke.

No smoking signage is already up at the Libro Centre thanks to provincial legislation but town council is also considering another outdoor smoke-free bylaw to further protect people from second-hand smoke.

“When a special event is being conducted on town-owned spaces, the bylaw provides that an area can be designated as a smoking area during the event,” Rubli stated. “The designation of a smoking area during a special event will be determined with the event organizer and public events committee.”

Rubli’s report states the new smoking prohibitions contained in the bylaw “will be predominately socially regulated and enforced.”

The WECHU Tobacco Enforcement Officers, the town’s bylaw enforcement officer and the Amherstburg Police Service can conduct formal enforcement of this bylaw.

“Public education is an important component to ensure compliance with proposed bylaw 2016-113. Administration in cooperation with WECHU will develop a communication plan for the new bylaw and will target event organizers, sports organizations and recreational facility users,” wrote Rubli. “Signage will also be erected to serve as a reminder of the bylaw prohibitions.”

Deputy Mayor Bart DiPasquale stated that the WECHU works with municipalities to develop or update their smoke-free bylaws.

“In our case, we didn’t have one in place,” said DiPasquale. “We are working on one now.”

DiPasquale said the public can provide input prior to the Dec. 12 meeting and believes he will be reading e-mails on the topic. He said the idea behind the proposed bylaw is to protect the public, including children, from smoke.

“The idea is to have cleaner air than what we’ve got,” said DiPasquale. “Second-hand smoke is not a good thing. We’re just trying to protect people more.”

DiPasquale said he quit smoking over 20 years ago and hasn’t looked back.

“I don’t miss it at all,” he said.