Amherstburg Public School

Amherstburg Public School’s “Vow of Silence” exceeds its goal

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School’s #BeTheChange campaign and its accompanying “vow of silence” hit its targets for 2016.

The recent initiative, led by Melisa Mulcaster’s Grade 7 class, raised $832 with the goal being $700. #BeTheChange was to recognize those children who can’t normally speak for themselves with the proceeds being donated to Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

Mulcaster said that allows the school to feed the entire village in Uganda that SACU supports with bananas and oatmeal.

Students at Amherstburg Public School held their "vow of silence" May 5 and raised $832 for Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

Students at Amherstburg Public School held their “vow of silence” May 5 and raised $832 for Save African Child Uganda (SACU).

“The students showed an amazing amount of dedication and compassion towards this cause!” said Mulcaster. “We are beyond proud of the APS student body. When they set their mind to something, they achieve it. Ronald and Hadijah sent us a video all the way from Uganda and are thrilled about their sponsorship! It’s definitely a feel good initiative!”

Students took to heart what they were doing and were eager to help children who don’t have basic human rights or freedoms such as the ability to go to school.

“I cannot believe why all this stuff is happening and we do nothing to stop it,” said Dakota Lucier. “It’s not good and we really have to do something about it.”

As for why he was participating in the “vow of silence,” Spencer Gallant stated “I can’t believe how some people live in poor countries. When we are young, we are full of joy but in some countries, kids are in fear and pain.”

“A lot of things like this are going on all the time and we tend to brush them off thinking ‘well, this is not my problem’,” added Nigel Harte. “But the truth is, it is your problem and it is my problem. It’s all of our problem.”

Some students observed the #BeTheChange vow of silence with tape over their mouths and cards around their necks explaining what they were doing. (Special to the RTT)

Some students observed the #BeTheChange vow of silence with tape over their mouths and cards around their necks explaining what they were doing. (Special to the RTT)

Hayden Zimmermann added: “Food, water, basic health care – these are the things we need to use to stop poverty. If we get together, we can convince the government to save a bit of money so we can get the countries in poverty the things they need for a year and then they can improve their country.

Another student, Tyler Ryan, stated “these kids need our help. Every day we complain about how our Internet sucks or how pizza can be expensive while these kids can’t even feel the satisfaction of a warm slice of pizza or even the wonderful feeling of cold water tricking down their throats.”

Harley Brooker said they participated in the silent day for the second year in a row to support the children who can’t speak up for themselves and to put themselves in their place to see how it feels to have no voice.

“We are trying to raise awareness,” said Brooker. “We are not the only ones who need fresh water or education. We are all human beings.”

“I am doing this is to show I care, that I want to make a change,” added Karlie Simon, “to say ‘I know you’re there and I want to help.”

Amherstburg Public students want to #BeTheChange for less fortunate children

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School students will fall silent on Thursday to recognize other children who are not as fortunate as they are.

The school’s second annual “vow of silence” will take place for all or part of the day, depending on grade level, and it is being organized by Melisa Mulcaster’s Grade 7 class.

“This a pledge the students take to commit to no talking, texting, or social media during the school day,” said Mulcaster. “They are raising awareness and standing together in solidarity for those who are denied their voice and basic human rights every day. Students from JK-8 will all take on this challenge in different amounts of time depending on their age. The intermediates have committed to the entire day.”

“It’s basically about kids who don’t have the right to say anything,” noted student Carlisa Elliott.

Grade 7 students at Amherstburg Public School are leading a “vow of silence” this Thursday with an assembly to kick it off being last Friday. THey are using the hashtag #BeTheChange to promote the cause.

Grade 7 students at Amherstburg Public School are leading a “vow of silence” this Thursday with an assembly to kick it off being last Friday. THey are using the hashtag #BeTheChange to promote the cause.

Classmate Nigel Harte added that a lot of children are bullied and some don’t have fresh water to drink or enough food to eat.

Rachel Jones said they were part of an assembly to promote the vow of silence and to stand with children who don’t have a voice in their lives. Abby Gorgerat said it is for those who simply don’t have basic human rights while Harley Brooker added children in some countries are unable to go to school.

Amherstburg Public raised $600 and sponsored two children from Save African Child Uganda (SACU). “This year, we want to be able to continue sponsoring them and providing them with the education, food and medical assistance they so desperately need,” said Mulcaster. “APS is committed to making a difference. Their theme is #BeTheChange and they are extremely dedicated and compassionate towards this cause. We want to show the community we care, and we can make a difference in the lives of others.”
The fundraising target this year is $700.

Students will also be out in the community promoting their cause during Thursday’s school day.

 

Book swap at Amherstburg Public aided by Link to Literacy

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School held a school-wide “For the Love of Reading” book swap last Friday to help promote literacy and a love of reading.

Students were called down to the library by grade where they were given an opportunity to trade in books they had brought in for new books. Those who weren’t able to bring in a book were also given a chance to take a book as well.

A “For the Love of Reading” book swap was held at Amherstburg Public School last Friday. It was helped by the Link to Literacy book drive.

A “For the Love of Reading” book swap was held at Amherstburg Public School last Friday. It was helped by the Link to Literacy book drive.

“It’s a school-wide trading of books,” explained teacher Shannon Hazel. “The kids have brought in so many books. They did a great job. We had an amazing turnout.”

The event was supported by Link to Literacy, a Windsor-Essex County children’s book drive co-ordinated annually by Tamye Machina. Machina started the drive after seeing a need for increased literacy among children during her time as a parent volunteer at Sandwich West Public School as some weren’t able to afford books.

“She works all year by herself in her basement (on the Link to Literacy children’s book drive),” explained Martha Martin, a teacher and liaison with Link to Literacy.

Donated books are given to schools that apply for them with Amherstburg Public being one of those schools.

For more on Link to Literacy, search “Link to Literacy Children’s Book Drive” on Facebook or following them on Twitter @LinktoLiteracy.

French Immersion coming to Amherstburg Public School

 

(CLARIFICATION: Amherstburg Public School will still be offering English JK/SK next year as French Immersion will be offered as an option. The school will be presenting French Immersion as part of a dual-track option.)

By Ron Giofu

 

Parents of students within the Greater Essex County District School Board who want to enroll their children in French Immersion will now be able to do so in Amherstburg.

Amherstburg Public School will begin offering French Immersion this fall with JK and SK students being the first recipients of the program. Principal Mark Campbell said the program will likely grow incrementally but will only be offered at first to the two kindergarten levels.

The development of French Immersion at Amherstburg Public School will allow students that would normally go to Anderdon Public School or Malden Central Public School to go to Amherstburg Public for the program. The fact the program is coming to Amherstburg will also allow public school families to stay closer to home. The closest option currently for French Immersion within the public board is Sandwich West Public School, said Campbell.

“It will be a transition,” said Campbell. “It will be interesting to see how many people come here or go to the French Catholic school down the road (École St.-Jean Baptiste).”

AmherstburgPublicWEB

According to information provided by the Greater Essex County District School Board (GECDSB), French Immersion students learn the same curriculum as those students enrolled in the English stream with only the language of instruction being different. Parents do not have to speak French, with Campbell noting report cards will be sent home in English.

The GECDSB touts benefits of the French Immersion program to be the increasing of first language skills, problem solving, respect and understanding of other cultures, the understanding of oneself and others, appreciation of the value of languages and its functions, the ability to understand and communicate in French and the increasing of opportunities for the future.

Campbell pointed out his own children are enrolled in French Immersion in Kingsville and he believes it will open up opportunities down the road for them.

“We’re a bilingual country,” he said. “It opens up opportunities in high school, university and beyond if they already have a second language acquired.”

SK and JK instruction will be entirely in French. Should the program expand locally, the French Immersion program calls for 80 per cent French instruction for Grades 2-5, and 50 per cent in Grades 6-8.

“We’re trying to get information out there,” said Campbell. He believes offering French Immersion could increase enrolment at the school and could possibly attract students from other boards as well as those who attend Anderdon or Malden.

“It’s not a competition,” he added. “We’re just offering a new program that just happens to be at Amherstburg Public School.”

Campbell believes it is an exciting time for Amherstburg Public School, but noted some teachers have some concerns.

“It’s a learning curve for everyone and we’ll see what it looks like,” said Campbell. “I think the benefits outweigh any costs that may be involved. It offers more opportunities for our school.”

For further information, contact the school at 519-736-2189 or the public board’s teacher consultant Angeline Humber at 519-255-3200 ext. 10218.

Early registration at Amherstburg Public School runs Feb. 16-26 with the JK open house being Feb. 17. Campbell indicated the teacher consultant will be at the open house and they will be able to answer questions, with Campbell adding he was a vice principal at a French Immersion school in the past.

 

Amherstburg Public School concludes holiday toy drive

Micah, Noah, Mateah and Nataliah Egglezos show some of the toys collected during a recent toy drive held at Amherstburg Public School. The drive was held in memory of Maisyn Spencer.

Micah, Noah, Mateah and Nataliah Egglezos show some of the toys collected during a recent toy drive held at Amherstburg Public School. The drive was held in memory of Maisyn Spencer.

 

By Ron Giofu

 

Amherstburg Public School has raised over 400 toys in memory of a little boy who died of cancer last year.

The school raised 464 gifts for the organization “Little Hands, Kids for a Cause,” which was set up in memory of Maisyn Spencer, an eight-year-old boy from Prince Andrew Public School who died last November. Melisa Mulcaster, a Grade 7 teacher at Amherstburg Public School, said the drive ended Tuesday after a two-week period.

“We wanted to focus on paying it forward,” said Mulcaster.

The gifts will benefit hospitalized children in London and Windsor, including being donated to Ronald McDonald Houses.

“We wanted to show Little Hands just how much Amherstburg P.S. likes to help others in need!” she said.

There was a “giving tree” in Mulcaster’s room and she said students were lining up daily with deliveries of new toys.

“The students here have been amazing,” said Mulcaster. “It’s been heartwarming to see them lining up at my door.”

Besides contributing to a great cause, Mulcaster said this also helps APS become a “ME TO WE” school, something Amherstburg is currently striving to be.

“Last year, we acted globally by sponsoring two children from SACU (Save African Child Uganda), and now we will act locally as well, helping out children in our own community,” said Mulcaster.

Mulcaster added they have also been selling candy canes for Hospice.

“We’re really trying to focus here on giving back and helping those who need help,” said Mulcaster.

Aimee Omstead, who co-founded Little Hands with Leigh-Ann Mastronardi, said the group started by raising $700 at a lemonade stand and things spread from there. She said the toys will be earmarked for local children, noting many in London are from Windsor-Essex County.

Laura Spencer, Maisyn’s mother, was thrilled to see how Amherstburg Public School did.

“It’s awesome,” she said. “It’s amazing. It’s great to know his memory is still alive.”

Knowing the toys are for sick children would make Maisyn smile, she added.