“Lights Out at the Libro” presented by Fighting Island Boxing Club

 

By Jonathan Martin

 

Beer, sweat and blood all flowed freely at the Libro Centre last Saturday.

Fighting Island Boxing Club hosted its “Lights Out at the Libro” event, where 20 amateur boxers fought it out in front of professional judges and a screaming crowd.

The card included athletes from a variety of age brackets and one women’s bout.  There was also a 50/50 draw and a raffle for a boxing-themed still-life painting with a handmade frame sculpted by Amherstburg Town Councillor Leo Meloche, who said he had never attended a boxing match before.

According to Fighting Island Boxing Club owner/coach Joe LeBlanc, the event went “pretty well.”

LeBlanc said that he had originally scheduled 18 boxers to compete, but lost almost half of them in the days leading up to the event.

“It tends to happen in amateur sports,” he said.  “Either people back out or have other obligations.  It is what it is.”

Nate DiPasquale strikes Quentin Broad in the last bout of the night. DiPasquale walked away victorious.

Those who did compete, though, did “fantastic,” according to LeBlanc.

“It’s not about winning or losing in a club show,” he said.  “It’s all about entertaining the public and getting these young athletes the experience in the ring.”

LeBlanc said that as long as the boxers learned something in this local event they could use in one of the larger travel tournaments, their bout was a win.

Leo Meloche (right) created a frame shaped like a boxing ring with a print he bought a few years ago and donated it back to the Fighting Island Boxing Club. The club raffled it off at the July 14 show.

Nate DiPasquale is an Amherstburg native who finished off the night with a bloodied face, a win and a smile.  He said the night benefited everyone.

“It was really great seeing all these people come out,” he said.  “Getting the community together like this, it’s good for the club and it’s good for the town.”

DiPasquale said fighting in front of his home community was both unique and empowering.  He said seeing the faces and hearing the cheers gave him a boost, but he had to reconcile that emotion with the cold precision of an intense, six-minute bout.

“You have to sort of block it all out and just focus on the other guy, where his hands are and where your head is,” he said.  “(Family and friends) will be there to celebrate with you afterwards.”

The audience’s tickets cost $20 apiece, with all the proceeds going back into Fighting Island’s non-profit programming.

 

 

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