News

Local author launches teen psychic mystery series

 

By Jolene Perron

 

“Imagine a teenager possessing a psychic ability and struggling to cope with this freakish power, all the while trying to lead a normal life. Now, imagine being uprooted and forced to live in a small tourist town where nothing much ever happens. It’s bores-ville from the get-go. Welcome to Fairy Falls. Expect the unexpected.”

Local author Sharon Ledwith has just launched her first novel in a series, and will be having a book signing at Amherstburg’s Pet Valu this Saturday from 12-3 p.m. Ledwith will be hooking up with S.N.A.P. (Spay Neuter Assist Program for Cats), who will also be running a bake sale from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. that day, and she will be donating 25 per cent of the sale of each book to that organization. Having her book signing at a pet oriented store is incredibly fitting, because her book is also centered around animals.

Local author Sharon Ledwith is launching her new novel, which she describes as a teen psychic mystery series. She will be having a book signing at Pet Valu July 29 from 12 – 3 p.m., with 25 per cent of the proceeds going towards S.N.A.P.

Local author Sharon Ledwith is launching her new novel, which she describes as a teen psychic mystery series. She will be having a book signing at Pet Valu July 29 from 12 – 3 p.m., with 25 per cent of the proceeds going towards S.N.A.P.

“The Fairy Falls Animal Shelter is in trouble. Money trouble,” explained Ledwith. “It’s up to an old calico cat named Whiskey—a shelter cat who has mastered the skill of observation—to find a new human pack leader so that their home will be saved. With the help of Nobel, the leader of the shelter dogs, the animals set out to use the ancient skill of telepathy to contact any human who bothers to listen to them. Unfortunately for fifteen-year-old Meagan Walsh, she hears them, loud and clear.”

The 56-year-old author started the publication journey in the 1990s, when, after an evening of inspiring thought, she took a writing course where she met a large group of “great-minded would-be writer gals.” She said they started what she calls a writing support group, and she wrote her first novel – a paranormal romance. She said it caught the eye of one agent, but she was hardly ready and recognizes that now. After many rejections, honing her craft, and continuing with her writer’s group, she finally reached an epiphany.

“One night, during my writer’s group, one of my friends said something that floored me,” said Ledwith. “She mentioned that I hit my twelve-year-old character’s voice bang on. So, this got me to thinking—how hard would it be to write a young adult novel? It was a stupid question. Of course it was hard. After thinking about what my friend had said to me, I decided I’d challenge myself and write not just a novel—but a series—that would appeal to my son, who at the time was the target age of my audience.”

The animal shelter idea spoke to Ledwith because of her year-long stint as an animal care attendant where she learned about the inner workings of animal shelters. Her creative imagination lead her to thoughts about what the animals she worked with may say if they had a voice.

“All the shelter animals in Lost and Found are based on an animal I cared for in some capacity at the shelter,” said Ledwith. “I observed certain quirks, how each animal behaved, what were they afraid of, what they liked, and so on. What I found was that every animal, even kittens born in the same litter, was different. Just like people. When I was ready to sit down and write their story, I compiled a list of shelter animals that readers would emotionally relate to and connect with. Many came to me as a surprise, others were firmly planted in my imagination from the very beginning.”

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Thus the idea of her novel was born. It all begins with her main character, Meagan, who is forced to live with her Aunt Izzy in the safe and quiet town of Fairy Falls. When Meagan is caught stealing, she is sentenced to do community hours at the animal shelter where her aunt works. Knowing Meagan can hear her, Whiskey realizes Meagan just might have the pack leader qualities necessary to save the animals. Avoiding Whiskey and the rest of the shelter animals becomes impossible for Meagan, so she finally gives in and promises to help them. Meagan, along with her newfound friends, Reid Robertson and Natalie Knight, discover someone in Fairy Falls is not only out to destroy the shelter, but the animals as well.

Ledwith wrote the book for one year, and after waiting nearly 10 years to publish it, she is excited to get the book out into the eyes of the public.

For more information about Ledwith and her book, visit sharonledwith.com.

Essex County celebrates Canada 150 by burying time capsule, dunking politicians

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

The County of Essex celebrated Canada 150 last Friday and hopes that people 100 years from now will remember what 2017 was like.

An outdoor celebration took place at the Essex Civic Centre with one of the main attractions being the burying of a time capsule that isn’t supposed to be opened for another 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

Warden Tom Bain (left) buries a time capsule with the help of Essex County council members and county CAO Brian Gregg (bottom right) on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre. The capsule will be opened in 100 years.

The event was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

County CAO Brian Gregg said in addition to it being Canada 150, it is also the 225th anniversary of the formation of Essex County. When it is opened, the county will be celebrating its 325th anniversary, he noted.

“The contents of this capsule features artifacts from all seven of the county’s municipalities,” Gregg pointed out.

Gregg said the capsule was buried on the grounds of the civic centre under a “symbolic maple tree” and will give a “snapshot” of the past when it is eventually opened. Gregg, who is retiring later this year, said he has spent over 30 years with the County of Essex and has seen it grow.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

Members of Essex County council, administration and general public tried to form a Canada 150 logo on the grounds of the Essex Civic Centre last Friday. The celebration was funded by the Windsor-Essex Community Foundation.

“I can only imagine what is in store for the next 100 years,” he said.

Warden Tom Bain said the Canada 150 event was “about honouring our history, relishing our present and looking forward to our future.”

Bain, who would later be one of the politicians and administration members to get wet in the dunk tank, also pointed out the 225th anniversary for the county. Bain stated Essex County has a rich history as he said it was the first county in Ontario to be formed prior to Confederation and the road that is now County Road 20 was the first road to be laid out in Ontario.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya reacts as he gets dunked during the County of Essex’s Canada 150 celebration last Friday afternoon.

A number of children attended the Canada 150 celebration and the warden told them to learn from both successes and failures.

“Do not forget the words collaboration, communication, kindness, and my favourite word, teamwork,” said Bain.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

Brian Gregg, CAO for the County of Essex, shows the time capsule that has now been buried on the northwest corner of the Essex Civic Centre grounds.

The event also featured children’s activities, the formation of county officials into a human Canada 150 logo, a barbecue and the appearance of the Memorial Cup, the junior hockey trophy captured by the Windsor Spitfires.

Last year’s “Paulie Award” winner looking forward to car show

 

 

By Ron Giofu

 

In just a few days, the Amherstburg’s Gone Car Crazy show will crown its 2017 best in show winner.

However, last year’s winner is looking forward to attending as well and having his car prominently featured under a tent by the main stage in Toddy Jones Park.

Amherstburg resident Ken Reder and his 1934 Buick “Woody” will be at this year’s show and while he is ineligible to win this year due to his victory last year, he is looking forward to being at Sunday’s car show. The “Woody” was something he worked on for several years, after finding the frame in Traverse City, Michigan almost six years ago.

Ken Reder of Amherstburg stands with his 1934 Buick Woody, a car that he built using wood from his own property. The car won the “Paulie Award” at last year’s Amherstburg’s Gone Car Crazy show and will be on display at this year’s car show, scheduled for this Sunday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Ken Reder of Amherstburg stands with his 1934 Buick Woody, a car that he built using wood from his own property. The car won the “Paulie Award” at last year’s Amherstburg’s Gone Car Crazy show and will be on display at this year’s car show, scheduled for this Sunday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

“It took me about three years (to build), working about two days a week,” said Reder. “Buick never made a Woody in 1934 so it’s kind of a phantom, a creation.”

Already the owner of several classic cars, Reder said the Buick Woody allowed him to combine his two hobbies. The other hobby is woodworking and Reder has his own wood shop behind his home. All the wood for the vehicle came from property his family owns.

Mechanically, he said the Woody was built with leftover parts.

“There wasn’t much there when we started,” he said.

Currently, Reder said he also owns a 1967 GTO and a 1932 Buick and sold a 1929 Pontiac and a 1933 Buick.

The Woody has a waterproof cover and is kept inside for the most part but went on a trip to Minnesota with wife Gail and had no issues with the car leaking when it was caught in the rain on occasion.

“I expected to see leaks,” he said. “We didn’t have any leaks at that time.”

They plan on taking the Buick Woody to Louisville, Kentucky Aug. 6 for another car show. He has a trailer that goes along with the Woody, having built that first in order to figure out how to build the car.

Reder said he was “really surprised” to win the Paulie Award last year.

“With the number of cars in Amherstburg, you don’t go in expecting anything,” said Reder.

A look at the interior of Ken Reder's 1934 Buick Woody. As last year's Paulie Award winner, the car will sit under the tent near the main stage in Toddy Jones Park this year.

A look at the interior of Ken Reder’s 1934 Buick Woody. As last year’s Paulie Award winner, the car will sit under the tent near the main stage in Toddy Jones Park this year.

The Woody has also been featured in two national U.S. magazines. One of those magazines is “Street Scene” and Reder estimates that magazine staff have over 100,000 cars to choose from since members of the National Street Rod Association have multiple vehicles. Association members like Reder get the magazine and there are over 58,000 members.

“It was quite a thrill,” he said of the acknowledgment.

The Amherstburg’s Gone Car Crazy show runs July 30 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in the town’s downtown streets. For more information or to volunteer, call Eleanor Renaud at 519-736-4020 or visit www.amherstburgsgonecarcrazyshow.com.

First Baptist Church helping the community to be healthier, happier this summer

 

 

By Jolene Perron

 

A Windsor student has been hired in Amherstburg to coordinate the summer Healthy Lifestyle program through First Baptist Church this year.

Staecey-Merveille Ngabire, 18, was hired for nine weeks this summer. She is in charge of coordinating First Baptist Church’s Healthy Lifestyle program, which kicks off Friday at 6 p.m. The program had a bit of a jump start over the weekend, with a group of people from their church and community coming together to garden and pull weeds outside of the church.

Members and community volunteers from First Baptist Church gathered together to weed the gardens and clean up the outside of the church Saturday, which kick-starts their healthy lifestyle program, running every Friday at 6 p.m. until September.

Members and community volunteers from First Baptist Church gathered together to weed the gardens and clean up the outside of the church Saturday, which kick-starts their healthy lifestyle program, running every Friday at 6 p.m. until September.

“Since we have had a lot of rain recently,” explained Ngabire. “I asked the pastor if we could garden so when it rains again, the flowers and the grass would look much more beautiful for the tourism section of my program that I’m coordinating.”
Ngabire explained she decided to make an eight steps in eight weeks program, where everyone involved will learn how to be more healthy and she made sure the program would allow for those involved to keep up with their personal healthy lifestyles after the program is over.

“The first step we are going to do is going to be right mindset and right attitude, because you can’t start anything without having a good positive outlook on how it’s going to go,” said Ngabire. “Then we are going to talk about detoxing your body, we’re going to do exercises, and we’re also going to relate it to how God can help you in everything you do.”

Members and community volunteers from First Baptist Church gathered together to weed the gardens and clean up the outside of the church Saturday, which kick-starts their healthy lifestyle program, running every Friday at 6 p.m. until September.

Members and community volunteers from First Baptist Church gathered together to weed the gardens and clean up the outside of the church Saturday, which kick-starts their healthy lifestyle program, running every Friday at 6 p.m. until September.

Ngabire explained her pastor at her church in Windsor told her about the opportunity. Usually she would have the opportunity to teach Sunday school to a smaller group, or help out with youth group, but she wanted to do more.

“I took the opportunity and said I would take on this challenge,” said Ngabire. “When I talked to my pastor from Windsor, he said that the First Baptist Church from Amherstburg is a great place to start and they would benefit from the talents that I have, so I thought I should share that with Amherstburg.”

For more information on the Healthy Lifestyle program starting Friday at First Baptist Church, contact Ngabire directly at 226-280-7789.

Non-threatening injuries after truck hits resident

 

 

A 24-year-old Amherstburg woman suffered non-life threatening injuries after she was accidently run over by a pickup truck.

The Amherstburg Police Service states the woman was unloading items from the rear of a Dodge Ram pickup truck when the truck slipped into reverse and ran her over. The incident occurred last Wednesday around 10:30 a.m. in the 500 block of Golfview Dr.

The woman was transported to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

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Public intoxication   A 58-year-old Amherstburg man was arrested for public intoxication last Thursday around 9:20 p.m. Police say the officer received a call from a person reporting the male staggering on the roadway.

The arrest was made in the 3600 block of Creek Road.

 

Mischief   Amherstburg police state that six golf carts were reported damaged at Pointe West Golf Club. It occurred overnight Thursday night/Friday morning.

There are no suspects and no value of damage reported, police say.

 

Stats   There were 173 calls for service the week of July 17-14. There were 21 traffic-related charges laid.

—All information courtesy of the Amherstburg Police Service